Reading the Comics, December 3, 2016: Cute Little Jokes Edition


Comic Strip Master Command apparently wanted me to have a bunch of easy little pieces that don’t inspire rambling essays. Message received!

Mark Litzler’s Joe Vanilla for the 27th is a wordplay joke in which any mathematical content is incidental. It could be anything put in a positive light; numbers are just easy things to arrange so. From the prominent appearance of ‘3’ and ‘4’ I supposed Litzler was using the digits of π, but if he is, it’s from some part of π that I don’t recognize. (That would be any part after the seventeenth digit. I’m not obsessive about π digits.)

Samson’s Dark Side Of The Horse is whatever the equivalent of punning is for Roman Numerals. I like Horace blushing.

John Deering’s Strange Brew for the 28th is a paint-by-numbers joke, and one I don’t see done often. And there is beauty in the appearance of mathematics. It’s not appreciated enough. I think looking at the tables of integral formulas on the inside back cover of a calculus book should prove the point, though. All those rows of integral signs and sprawls of symbols after show this abstract beauty. I’ve surely mentioned the time when the creative-arts editor for my undergraduate leftist weekly paper asked for a page of mathematics or physics work to include as an picture, too. I used the problem that inspired my “Why Stuff Can Orbit” sequence over on my mathematics blog. The editor loved the look of it all, even if he didn’t know what most of it meant.

Scientisty type: 'Yessirree, there we have it: I've just proved we're completely alone in a cold, dying universe'. This provokes an angry stare from the other scientisty type, who's wearing an 'I Believe' grey-aliens T-shirt.
Niklas Eriksson’s Carpe Diem for the 29th of November, 2016. I’m not sure why this has to be worked out in the break room but I guess you work out life where you do. Anyway, I’m glad to see the Grey Aliens allow for Green Aliens representing them on t-shirts.

Niklas Eriksson’s Carpe Diem for the 29th is a joke about life, I suppose. It uses a sprawled blackboard full of symbols to play the part of the proof. It’s gibberish, of course, although I notice how many mathematics cliches get smooshed into it. There’s a 3.1451 — I assume that’s a garbed digits of π — under a square root sign. There’s an “E = mc”, I suppose a garbled bit of Einstein’s Famous Equation in there. There’s a “cos 360”. 360 evokes the number of degrees in a circle, but mathematicians don’t tend to use degrees. There’s analytic reasons why we find it nicer to use radians, for which the equivalent would be “cos 2π”. If we wrote that at all, since the cosine of 2π is one of the few cosines everyone knows. Every mathematician knows. It’s 1. Well, maybe the work just got to that point and it hasn’t been cleaned up.

Eriksson’s Carpe Diem reappears the 30th, with a few blackboards with less mathematics to suggest someone having a creative block. It does happen to us all. My experience is mathematicians don’t tend to say “Eureka” when we do get a good idea, though. It’s more often some vague mutterings and “well what if” while we form the idea. And then giggling or even laughing once we’re sure we’ve got something. This may be just me and my friends. But it is a real rush when we have it.

Scientisty type speaking to a disheartened scientisty type. 'Oh, do shut UP, von Braun. I haven't had the chance to shout 'Eureka' all week either.'
Niklas Eriksson’s Carpe Diem for the 30th of November, 2016. Maybe he should take a warm bath?

Dan Collins’s Looks Good On Paper for the 29t tells the Möbius strip joke. It’s a well-rendered one, though; I like that there is a readable strip in there and that it’s distorted to fit the geometry.

Henry Scarpelli and Craig Boldman’s Archie rerun for the 2nd of December tosses off the old gag about not needing mathematics now that we have calculators. It’s not a strip about that, and that’s fine.

Jughead and Archie reflect how it seems like a waste to learn mathematics when they have calculators, or spelling when they have spell-checkers. Archie suggests getting a snack and his dad says he's *got* a garbage disposal.
Henry Scarpelli and Craig Boldman’s Archie rerun for the 2nd of December, 2016. Now, not to nitpick, but Jughead and Archie don’t declare it *is* a waste of time to learn mathematics or spelling when a computer can do that work. Also, why don’t we have a word like ‘calculator’ for ‘spell-checker’? I mean, yes, ‘spell-checker’ is an acceptable word, but it’s like calling a ‘calculator’ an ‘arithmetic-doer’.

Mark Anderson’s Andertoons finally appeared the 2nd. It’s a resistant-student joke. And a bit of wordplay.

Ruben Bolling’s Super-Fun-Pak Comix from the 2nd featured an installment of Tautological But True. One might point out they’re using “average” here to mean “arithmetic mean”. There probably isn’t enough egg salad consumed to let everyone have a median-sized serving. And I wouldn’t make any guesses about the geometric mean serving. But the default meaning of “average” is the arithmetic mean. Anyone using one of the other averages would say so ahead of time or else is trying to pull something.

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Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there.

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