My Mathematics Reading For The 13th of June


I’m working on the next Why Stuff Can Orbit post, this one to feature a special little surprise. In the meanwhile here’s some of the things I’ve read recently and liked.

The Theorem of the Day is just what the name offers. They’re fit onto single slides, so there’s not much text to read. I’ll grant some of them might be hard reading at once, though, if you’re not familiar with the lingo. Anyway, this particular theorem, the Lindemann-Weierstrass Theorem, is one of the famous ones. Also one of the best-named ones. Karl Weierstrass is one of those names you find all over analysis. Over the latter half of the 19th century he attacked the logical problems that had bugged calculus for the previous three centuries and beat them all. I’m lying, but not by much. Ferdinand von Lindemann’s name turns up less often, but he’s known in mathematics circles for proving that π is transcendental (and so, ultimately, that the circle can’t be squared by compass and straightedge). And he was David Hilbert’s thesis advisor.

The Lindemann-Weierstrass Theorem is one of those little utility theorems that’s neat on its own, yes, but is good for proving other stuff. This theorem says that if a given number is algebraic (ask about that some A To Z series) then e raised to that number has to be transcendental, and vice-versa. (The exception: e raised to 0 is equal to 1.) The page also mentions one of those fun things you run across when you have a scientific calculator and can repeat an operation on whatever the result of the last operation was.

I’ve mentioned Maths By A Girl before, but, it’s worth checking in again. This is a piece about Apéry’s Constant, which is one of those numbers mathematicians have heard of, and that we don’t know whether is transcendental or not. It’s hard proving numbers are transcendental. If you go out trying to build a transcendental number it’s easy, but otherwise, you have to hope you know your number is the exponential of an algebraic number.

I forget which Twitter feed brought this to my attention, but here’s a couple geometric theorems demonstrated and explained some by Dave Richeson. There’s something wonderful in a theorem that’s mostly a picture. It feels so supremely mathematical to me.

And last, Katherine Bourzac writing for Nature.com reports the creation of a two-dimensional magnet. This delights me since one of the classic problems in statistical mechanics is a thing called the Ising model. It’s a basic model for the mathematics of how magnets would work. The one-dimensional version is simple enough that you can give it to undergrads and have them work through the whole problem. The two-dimensional version is a lot harder to solve and I’m not sure I ever saw it laid out even in grad school. (Mind, I went to grad school for mathematics, not physics, and the subject is a lot more physics.) The four- and higher-dimensional model can be solved by a clever approach called mean field theory. The three-dimensional model .. I don’t think has any exact solution, which seems odd given how that’s the version you’d think was most useful.

That there’s a real two-dimensional magnet (well, a one-molecule-thick magnet) doesn’t really affect the model of two-dimensional magnets. The model is interesting enough for its mathematics, which teaches us about all kinds of phase transitions. And it’s close enough to the way certain aspects of real-world magnets behave to enlighten our understanding. The topic couldn’t avoid drawing my eye, is all.

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