Reading the Comics, February 7, 2018: Not Taking Algebra Too Seriously Edition


There were nearly a dozen mathematically-themed comic strips among what I’d read, and they almost but not quite split mid-week. Better, they include one of my favorite ever mathematics strips from Charles Schulz’s Peanuts.

Jimmy Halto’s Little Iodine for the 4th of December, 1956 was rerun the 2nd of February. Little Iodine seeks out help with what seems to be story problems. The rate problem — “if it takes one man two hours to plow seven acros, how long will it take five men and a horse to … ” — is a kind I remember being particularly baffling. I think it’s the presence of three numbers at once. It seems easy to go from, say, “if you go two miles in ten minutes, how long will it take to go six miles?” to an answer. To go from “if one person working two hours plows seven acres then how long will five men take to clear fourteen acres” to an answer seems like a different kind of problem altogether. It’s a kind of problem for which it’s even wiser than usual to carefully list everything you need.

Iodone, going into a department store. 'Boy, we got tough homework for tomorrow.' At Information: 'If it takes one man two hours to plow seven acres, how long will it take five men and a horse to --- etc' Clerk: 'Wha? Uh ... let me get a pencil. Will you repeat that, please? ... Cipher ... two o carry ... mmm ... times x ... minus ... mmm ... now let me think ... ' NEXT DAY; Teacher: 'Sharkey Shannon, 92, very good, Sharkey. Shalimar Shultz, 94, excellent, Shalimar. Iodine Tremblechin ... zero ... every problem wrong! Iodine ... I just can't understand it ... not one single answer correct!' Iodine, at the Complaint Department: 'Somebody in this store has to write a hundred times 'I will henceforth study harder'!
Jimmy Halto’s Little Iodine for the 2nd of December, 1956 and rerun the 4th of February, 2018. It’s the rare Little Iodine where she doesn’t get her father fired!

Kieran Meehan’s Pros and Cons for the 5th uses a bit of arithmetic. It looks as if it’s meant to be a reminder about following the conclusions of one’s deductive logic. It’s more common to use 1 + 1 equalling 2, or 2 + 2 equalling 4. Maybe 2 times 2 being 4. But then it takes a little turn into numerology, trying to read more meaning into numbers than is wise. (I understand why people should use numerological reasoning, especially given how much mathematicians like to talk up mathematics as descriptions of reality and how older numeral systems used letters to represent words. And that before you consider how many numbers have connotations.)

Judge: 'Members of the jury, before retiring to consider your verdict, I shall give you my summing-up. 3 + 3 = 6. There are six letters in the word 'guilty'. Coincidence? I don't believe in coincidences.'
Kieran Meehan’s Pros and Cons for the 5th of February, 2018. I grant the art is a bit less sophisticated than in Little Iodine. But the choice of two features to run outside the panels and into the white gutters is an interesting one and I’m not sure what Meehan is going for in choosing one word balloon and the judge’s hand to run into the space like that.

Charles Schulz’s Peanuts for the 5th of February reruns the strip from the 8th of February, 1971. And it is some of the best advice about finding the values of x and y, and about approaching algebra, that I have ever encountered.

Trixie: 'Look at all the birds!! I wonder how many there are! Sic, nine, five, 'leven, eight, fwee, two! Only two! It sure looked like there were more!'
Mort Walker and Dik Browne’s Hi and Lois for the 10th of August, 1960 was rerun the 6th of February, 2018. And I do like Trixie’s look of bafflement in the last panel there; it’s more expressive than seems usual for the comic even in its 1960s design.

Mort Walker and Dik Browne’s Hi and Lois for the 10th of August, 1960 was rerun the 6th of February. It’s a counting joke. Babies do have some number sense. At least babies as old as Trixie do, I believe, in that they’re able to detect that something weird is going on when they’re shown, eg, two balls put into a box and four balls coming out. (Also it turns out that stage magicians get called in to help psychologists study just how infants and toddlers understand the world, which is neat.)

John Zakour and Scott Roberts’s Maria’s Day for the 7th is Ms Payne’s disappointed attempt at motivating mathematics. I imagine she’d try going on if it weren’t a comic strip limited to two panels.

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Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

5 thoughts on “Reading the Comics, February 7, 2018: Not Taking Algebra Too Seriously Edition”

    1. Oh, yes, absolutely. It’s rare to see Little Iodine this angry about anything.

      Now I wonder when the Cartoonist Ball did fade away. I think only James Allen uses it all that much and everyone else has gone for a signature run vertically in the last panel.

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