Reading the Comics, March 24, 2018: Arithmetic and Information Edition


And now I can bring last week’s mathematically-themed comics into consideration here. Including the whole images hasn’t been quite as much work as I figured. But that’s going to change, surely. One of about four things I know about life is that if you think you’ve got your workflow set up to where you can handle things you’re about to be surprised. Can’t wait to see how this turns out.

John Deering’s Strange Brew for the 22nd is edging its way toward an anthropomorphic numerals joke.

Man, to woman at candlelit dinner: 'I can still remember the cute little number you were wearing the day we first met.' He's wearing the number 72102; she, 67350.
John Deering’s Strange Brew for the 22nd of March, 2018. I like to think she was wearing something from the Gary Larson collection.

Brant Parker and Johnny Hart’s Wizard of Id for the 22nd is a statistics joke. Really a demographics joke. Which still counts; much of the historical development of statistics was in demographics. That it was possible to predict accurately the number of people in a big city who’d die, and what from, without knowing anything about whether any particular person would die was strange and astounding. It’s still an astounding thing to look directly at.

The Duke: 'Sire, I have worked out some amazing statistics, here.' The King: 'Let's hear them.' The Duke: 'My figures show that the odds against a short man outliving a tall man are 5 to 1.' The King: 'Have the royal basketball team report to the gallows.'
Brant Parker and Johnny Hart’s Wizard of Id for the 25th of March 1968, and rerun the 22nd of March, 2018. That’s an interesting demographic the Kingdom of Id has there. Just saying.

Hilary Price and Rina Piccolo’s Rhymes with Orange for the 23rd has the form of a story problem. I could imagine turning this into a proper story problem. You’d need some measure of how satisfying the 50-dollar wines are versus the 5-dollar wines. Also how much the wines affect people’s ability to notice the difference. You might be able to turn this into a differential equations problem, but that’s probably overkill.

The Pop^Cork Quiz. Hostess with bottles of wine. Caption: 'If Laura owns 5 bottles of 50-dollar wine and 5 bottles of 5-dollar wine, how many bottles of 50-dollar wine must she serve in order to switch to the 5-dollar wine without anyone noticing?'
Hilary Price and Rina Piccolo’s Rhymes with Orange for the 23rd of March, 2018. Fortunately, one of Laura’s guests brought Jesus of Nazareth along as his `plus one’.

Mark Anderson’s Andertoons for the 23rd is Mark Anderson’s Andertoons for this half of the week. It’s a student-avoiding-the-problem joke. Could be any question. But arithmetic has the advantages of being plausible, taking up very little space to render, and not confusing the reader by looking like it might be part of the joke.

Kid at the blackboard, pondering 72 / 8: 'I know the answer, I'm just letting the suspense build.'
Mark Anderson’s Andertoons for the 23rd of March, 2018. Yeah, don’t try this with your thesis committee. Word to the wise.

John Zakour and Scott Roberts’s Working Daze for the 23rd has another cameo appearance by arithmetic. It’s also a cute reminder that there’s no problem you can compose that’s so simple someone can’t over-think it. And it puts me in mind of the occasional bit where a company’s promotional giveaway will technically avoid being a lottery by, instead of awarding prizes, awarding the chance to demonstrate a skill. Demonstration of that skill, such as a short arithmetic quiz, gets the prize. It’s a neat bit of loophole work and does depend, as the app designers here do, on the assumption there’s some arithmetic that people can be sure of being able to do.

Ed: 'The trick to making an easy quiz app is to come up with questions anybody could get right.' Rita: 'One plus one. Well, that's easy. It's two. No, wait. It's a trick question. It's eleven. Right? Unless ... ' Roy, thinking: 'This is going to be harder than we thought.'
John Zakour and Scott Roberts’s Working Daze for the 23rd of March, 2018. Ask your friend who does web stuff about Javascript and addition. You won’t understand the results but that’s all right; neither do they.

Teresa Burritt’s Frog Applause for the 24th is its usual bit of Dadist nonsense. But in the talk about black holes it throws in an equation: S = \frac{A k c^3}{4 G \hbar} . This is some mathematics about black holes, legitimate and interesting. It is the entropy of a black hole. The dazzling thing about this is all but one of those symbols on the right is the same for every black hole. ‘c’ is the speed of light, as in ‘E = mc2‘. G is the gravitational constant of the universe, a measure of how strong gravity is. \hbar is Planck’s constant, a kind of measure of how big quantum mechanics effects are. ‘k’ is the Boltzmann constant, which normal people never heard of but that everyone in physics and chemistry knows well. It’s what you multiply by to switch from the temperature of a thing to the thermal energy of the thing, or divide by to go the other way. It’s the same number for everything in the universe.

Woman's legs emerging from a portable hole, in three panels. The caption: 'Help! I'm defying the laws of gravity while also being sucked into a black hole that's supposed to be invisible --- except when the hole is in a comic strip!' (And on the side, S = Akc^3/4G h-bar.) 'Holy Hawking! As the space-time continuum continuums, I'm being warped into a state of striped-pants disreality teetering on a crummy fulcrum of fugly shoes. And even if I shout, 'I've fallen in a black hole and I can't get out', I'll forever be sinking deeper into a lamer surreality that never reaches the tendency pit of analyticity.'
Teresa Burritt’s Frog Applause for the 24th of March, 2018. Honestly surprised I didn’t see talk about striped-pants direality in Zippy the Pinhead first.

The only thing custom to a particular black hole is ‘A’, which is the surface area of the black hole. I mean the surface area of the event horizon. Double the surface area of the event horizon and you double its entropy. (This isn’t doubling the radius of the event horizon, but you know how much growth in the radius it is.) Also entropy. Hm. Everyone who would read this far into a pop mathematics blog like this knows that entropy is “how chaotic a thing is”. Thanks to people like Boltzmann we can be quantitative, and give specific and even exact numbers to the entropy of a system. It’s still a bit baffling since, superficially, a black hole seems like it’s not at all chaotic. It’s a point in space that’s got some mass to it, and maybe some electric charge and maybe some angular momentum. That’s about it. How messy can that be? It doesn’t even have any parts. This is how we can be pretty sure there’s stuff we don’t understand about black holes yet. Also about entropy.

This strip might be an oblique and confusing tribute to Dr Stephen Hawking. The entropy formula described was demonstrated by Drs Jacob Bekenstein and Stephen Hawking in the mid-1970s. Or it might be coincidence.

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Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

2 thoughts on “Reading the Comics, March 24, 2018: Arithmetic and Information Edition”

  1. Perhaps it’s a tribute to Ringo “I’ve got a ‘ole in me pocket!” Starr. Poor guy’s so depressed he’d jump in the river Mersey ‘cept it looks like rain. He could use the ego-boost. Guy’s likely to do anything like show his motor to a Nowhere Man.

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