Reading the Comics, May 5, 2018: Does Anyone Know Where The Infinite Hotel Comes From Edition


With a light load of mathematically-themed comic strips I’m going to have to think of things to write about twice this coming week. Fortunately, I have plans. We’ll see how that works out for me. So far this year I’m running about one-for-eight on my plans.

Mort Walker and Dik Browne’s Hi and Lois for the 1st of November, 1960 looks pretty familiar somehow. Having noticed what might be the first appearance of “the answer is twelve?” in Peanuts I’m curious why Chip started out by guessing twelve. Probably just coincidence. Possibly that twelve is just big enough to sound mathematical without being conspicuously funny, like 23 or 37 or 42 might be. I’m a bit curious that after the first guess Sally looked for smaller numbers than twelve, while Chip (mostly) looked for larger ones. And I see a logic in going from a first guess of 12 to a second guess of either 4 or 144. The 32 is a weird one.

Teacher: 'Chip, do you know the answer to number five?' Chip: 'Is it twelve? No, wait ... it's four. Or is it 32 ... it's either that or 144. No, wait a second ... I'll get it.' Teacher: 'I'm sure you will --- we're nearly out of numbers!'
Mort Walker and Dik Browne’s Hi and Lois for the 1st of November, 1960 and reprinted the 30th of April, 2018. Yeah, sure, eleven years later Charles Schulz would do basically the same joke. But comics snarkers get all smug when they notice that The Argyle Sweater is using the same premise as a Far Side from 1983 or something.

Tom Toles’s Randolph Itch, 2 am for the 30th of April, 2018 is on at least its third appearance around here. I suppose I have to retire the strip from consideration for these comics roundups. It didn’t run that long, sad to say, and I think I’ve featured all its mathematical strips. I’ll go on reading, though, as I like the style and Toles’s sense of humor.

Randolph, thinking in bed: 'Algebra pretty much put pirates out of business.' Pirate teacher: 'If ax^2 + bx + c = 0, what is x?' And a pirate sweats. Footer joke: '15 men on a dead man's chest, you ho ho, and a bottle of rum equals what?'
Tom Toles’s Randolph Itch, 2 am for the 30th of April, 2018. I think I’ve mentioned not knowing whether the legendary X on pirate maps is related to the use of X as the thing-to-be-found in algebra. My understanding is the X on a pirate map thing is mostly a matter of storytelling rather than something anyone really did.

Mark Tatulli’s Heart of the City for the 3rd of May is a riff on the motivation problem. For once, not about the motivation of the people in story problems to do what they do. It’s instead about why the student should care what the story people do. And, fair enough, really. It’s easy to calculate something you’d like to know the answer to. But give the teacher or textbook writer a break. There’s nothing that’s interesting to everybody. No, not even what minimum grade they need on this exam to get an A in the course. After a moment of clarity in fifth grade I never cared what my scores were. I just did my work and accepted the assessment. My choice not to worry about my grades had more good than bad results, but I admit, there were bad results too.

Heart: 'This homework is ridiculous! How are we supposed to know this? OK, so Julio has eleven apples! Why is it any of my business how many he shares with Allisa and Wesley? Why should I care how he divides them or what fraction he keeps for himself?' Dean: 'They're just math word problems. I don't think we have to explain motivation.' Heart: 'I guess I just can't get past why exactly a kid has eleven apples in the first place!'
Mark Tatulli’s Heart of the City for the 3rd of May, 2018. How does Heart know that Julio is a kid? Adults will go out and buy a dozen apples without that seeming strange, and we’ll eat as many as four of them before forgetting they’re on the counter and letting them rot by accident.

John McNamee’s Pie Comic for the 4th of May riffs on some ancient story-problems built on infinite sets. I don’t know the original source. I assume a Martin Gardiner pop-mathematics essay. I don’t know, though, and I’m curious if anyone does know.

[ You arrive at the Infinite Hotel ... but the concierge says *all* infinity of their rooms are booked. Luckily, you know MATH. 'Infinity = Infinity + 1'. You explain that if you just ask each guest to move one room over ... ] There's a large man in diapers with a sock puppet on his hand in the first door. [ Yeah ... math's not solving that. ] You drive away.
John McNamee’s Pie Comic for the 4th of May, 2018. Also you know how long it’d take to re-code everybody’s door access card? It’d be like forever.

Often I see these kinds of problem as set at the Hilbert Hotel. This references David Hilbert, the late-19th/early-20th century mastermind behind the 20th century’s mathematics field. They try to challenge people’s intuitions about infinitely large sets. Ponder a hotel with one room for each of the counting numbers. Suppose it’s full. How many guests can you add to it? Can you add infinitely many more guests, and still have room for them all? If you do it right, and if “infinitely many more guests” means something particular, yes. If certain practical points don’t get in the way. I mean practical for a hotel with infinitely many rooms.

This is a new-tag comic.

Medieval monks, talking about the one who's written down E = mc^2. 'God only knows what it means. This guy isn't all that swift.'
Dave Whamond’s Reality Check for the 4th of May, 2018. Yeah, I heard the sequel to A Canticle for Leibowitz was disappointing.

Dave Whamond’s Reality Check for the 4th is a riff on Albert Einstein’s best-known equation. He had some other work, granted. But who didn’t?

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Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there.

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