Reading the Comics, June 29, 2018: Chuckle and Breakfast Cereal Edition


The last half of last week was not entirely the work of Chuckle Brothers and Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal. It seemed like it, though. Let’s review.

Patrick Roberts’s Todd the Dinosaur for the 28th is a common sort of fear-of-mathematics joke. In this case the fear of doing arithmetic even when it is about something one would really like to know. I think the question got away from Todd, though. If they just wanted to know whether they had enough money, well, they need twelve dollars and have seven. Subtracting seven from twelve is only needed if they want to know how much more they need. Which they should want to know, but wasn’t part of the setup.

Kid: 'Do we have enough money to go to the movie?' Todd: 'Let's see! You ahve four dollars and I have three dollars. That's seven. The movie is twelve dollars for both of us. So twelve take away seven is ... *GASP* Oh no! I accidentally did math!' Kid: 'So?' Todd: 'This is SUMMER!' Kid: 'I don't even know you!'
Patrick Roberts’s Todd the Dinosaur for the 28th of June, 2018. I’m sorry, I don’t know the kid’s name.

Brian Boychuk and Ron Boychuk’s The Chuckle Brothers for the 28th uses mathematics as the sine qua non of rocket science. As in, well, the stuff that’s hard and takes some real genius to understand. It’s not clear to me that the equations are actually rocket science. There seem to be a shortage of things in exponentials to look quite right to me. But I can’t zoom in on the art, so, who knows just what might be in there.

Professor-type in front of a class labelled Rocket Science 101: 'Doesn't ANYBODY understand this stuff?'
Brian Boychuk and Ron Boychuk’s The Chuckle Brothers rerun for the 28th of June, 2018. It originally ran the 16th of July, 2009. Relatable.

Zach Weinersmith’s Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal for the 28th is a set theory joke. Or a logic joke, anyway. It refers to some of the mathematics/logic work of Bertrand Russell. Among his work was treating seriously the problems of how to describe things defined in reference to themselves. These have long been a source of paradoxes, sometimes for fun, sometimes for fairy-tale logic, and sometimes to challenge our idea of what we mean by definitions of things. Russell made a strong attempt at describing what we mean when we describe a thing by reference to itself. The iconic example here was the “set of all sets not members of themselves”.

Caption: 'Nobody liked Bertrand Russell's scavenger hunts.' Items to find: 'The list of all lists that do not list themselves. (List here).'
Zach Weinersmith’s Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal for the 28th of June, 2018. Well, among other things, wouldn’t there be infinitely many such lists? Unless this description were enough to describe them all, by being a description of what to do to get you all of them?

Russell started out by trying to find some way to prove Georg Cantor’s theorems about different-sized infinities wrong. He worked out a theory of types, and what kinds of rules you can set about types of things. Most mathematicians these days prefer to solve the paradox with a particular organization of set theory. But Russell’s type theory still has value, particularly as part of the logic behind lambda calculus. This is an approach to organizing relationships between things that can do wonderful things, including in computer programming. It lets one write code that works extremely efficiently and can never be explained to another person, modified, or debugged ever. I may lack the proper training for the uses I’ve made of it.

News anchor: 'In a cruel, bizarre twist of fate, this week's $1 million winning lotto number 579281703 was shared by exactly one million people. In other news ... ' (The person watching the news has a lottery ticket number 579281703.)
Brian Boychuk and Ron Boychuk’s The Chuckle Brothers rerun for the 29th of June, 2018. It originally ran the 17th of July, 2009. You can tell it’s from so long ago because the TV set is pre-HD.

Brian Boychuk and Ron Boychuk’s The Chuckle Brothers for the 29th is a lottery joke. It does happen that more than one person wins a drawing; sometimes three or even four people do, for the larger prizes. The chance that there’s a million winners? Frightfully unlikely unless something significant went wrong with the lottery mechanism.

So what are the chances of a million lottery winners? If I’m not mistaken the only way to do this is to work out a binomial distribution. The binomial distribution is good for cases where you have many attempts at doing a thing, where each thing can either succeed or fail, and the likelihood of success or failure is independent of all the other attempts. In this case each lottery ticket is an attempt; it winning is success and it losing is failure. Each ticket has the same chance of winning or losing, and that chance doesn’t depend on how many wins or losses there are. What is that chance? … Well, if each ticket has one chance in a million of winning, and there are a million tickets out there, the chance of every one of them winning is about one-millionth raised to the millionth power. Which is so close to zero it might as well be nothing. … And yet, for all that it’s impossible, there’s not any particular reason it couldn’t happen. It just won’t.

What I Learned This Year. Kid: 'Um ... you can divide a number by 3 if the sum of its digits can be divided by 3.' [ Later ] Frazz: 'So, what'd you learn this year?' Kid: 'Don't go last on what-I-learned-this-year day.'
Jef Mallet’s Frazz for the 29th of June, 2018. Sorry, again, not sure of this kid’s name. The comic is often so good about casually dropping in character names.

Jef Mallet’s Frazz for the 29th is a less dire take on what-you-learned-this-year. In this case it’s trivia, but it’s a neat sort of trivia. Once you understand how it works you can understand how to make all sorts of silly little divisibility rules. The threes rule — and the nines rule — work by the same principle. Suppose you have a three-digit number. Let me call ‘a’ the digit in the hundreds column, ‘b’ the digit in the tens column, and ‘c’ the digit in the ones column. Then the number is equal to 100\cdot a + 10\cdot b + 1\cdot c . And, well, that’s equal to 99\cdot a + 1\cdot a + 9 \cdot b + 1 \cdot b + 1 \cdot c . Which is 99\cdot a + 9 \cdot b + a + b + c . 99 times any whole number is a multiple of 9, and also of 3. 9 times any whole number is a multiple of 9, and also of 3. So whether the original number is divisible by 9, or by 3, depends on whether a + b + c is. And that’s why adding the digits up tells you whether a number is a whole multiple of three.

This has only proven anything for three-digit numbers. But with that proof in mind, you probably can imagine what the proof looks like for two- or four-digit numbers, and would believe there’s one for five- and for 500-digit numbers. Or, for that matter, the proof for an arbitrarily long number. So I’ll skip actually doing that. You can fiddle with it if you want a bit of fun yourself.

Also maybe it’s me, or the kind of person who gets into mathematics. But I find silly little rules like this endearing. It’s a process easy to understand that anyone can do and it tells you something not obvious from when you start. It feels like getting let in on a magic trick. That seems like the sort of thing that endears people to mathematics.

Michael: 'Grandma broke out the math workbooks!' Gabby: 'She does this every summer!' (They hide behind a tree.) Gabby: 'Says she doesn't want us to forget what we learned during the school year.' Michael: 'She has a point. We do need to keep our homework-avoidance skills sharp.'
Mike Thompson’s Grand Avenue for the 29th of June, 2018. At the risk of taking the art too literally: isn’t that tree kind of short to be that fat? Shouldn’t the leaves start higher up?

Mike Thompson’s Grand Avenue for the 29th is trying to pick its fight with me again. I can appreciate someone wanting to avoid kids losing their mathematical skills over summer. It’s just striking how Thompson has consistently portrayed their grandmother as doing this in a horrible, joy-crushing manner.

Greek: 'Why are you the wisest man, Socrates?' Socrates: 'Because I know one thing: that I know nothing.' Greek: 'That's all you know?' Socrates: 'I mean strictly speaking ... ' Greek: 'What about the infinite universe of analytic statements, like if A = A then A = A?' Socrates: 'Okay yeah That stuff. Just that.' Greek: 'Just ALL of math.' (Pause.) Greek: 'Sorry, did I make you sad?' Socrates: 'I can't be certain, but probably.'
Zach Weinersmith’s Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal for the 29th of June, 2018. I am curious if anyone in the philosophy department would offer an idea which Ancient Greek might be chatting with Socrates here. If Weinersmith had anyone in mind I would guess whichever one has Socrates getting a slave to do a geometry proof. But there’s also … I want to say Parmenides, where the elder scholar whips the young Socrates in straight syllogisms. Again, if anyone specific was in mind and it wasn’t just “another Ancient Greek type”.

Zach Weinersmith’s Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal for the 29th gets into a philosophy-of-mathematics problem. Also a pure philosophy problem. It’s a problem of what things you can know independently of experience. There are things it seems as though are true, and that seem independent of the person who is aware of them, and what culture that person comes from. All right. Then how can these things be relevant to the specifics of the universe that we happen to be in just now? If ‘2’ is an abstraction that means something independent of our universe, how can there be two books on the table? There’s something we don’t quite understand yet, and it’s taking our philosophers and mathematicians a long while to work out what that is.


And as ever, if you’d like to see more Reading the Comics posts, please look to this page. For essays with Todd the Dinosaur in them, look here. For essays with the Chuckle Brothers, here you go. For some of the many, many essays with Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal, follow this link. For more talk about Frazz, look here. And for the Grand Avenue comics, try this link please.

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Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

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