Reading the Comics, August 29, 2018: The Week I Missed One Edition


Have you ever wondered how I gather comic strips for these Reading the Comics posts? Sure, why not go along with me. Well, I do it by this: I read a lot of comic strips. When I run across one that’s got some mathematical theme, I copy the URL for it over to a page of notes. Then I go back to those notes and write up a paragraph or so on each. That is, I do it exactly the way you might imagine if you weren’t very imaginative or trying hard. I explain all this to say that I made a note that I then didn’t notice. So I missed a comic strip. And opened myself up to wondering if there’s an etymological link between “note” and “notice”. Anyway, it’s here. I’m just explaining why it’s late.

Jim Toomey’s Sherman’s Lagoon for the 19th of August is the belated inclusion. It’s a probability strip. It’s built partly on how badly people estimate probability, especially of rare events. And of how badly people estimate the consequences of rare events. For anything that isn’t common, our feelings about the likelihood of events are garbage. And even for common events we’re not that good.

Sherman: 'See that guy up on the beach?' Fillmore: 'Yeah.' Sherman: 'He's not swimming. Wanna know why? He's afraid of sharks. With the help of my friend Ernest, I will argue that his fear is irrational. Ernest, what are this guy's chances of getting attacked by a shark?' Ernest: 'One in 3.7 million.' Sherman: 'And what are his chances of getting struck by lightning?' Ernest: 'One in 600,000.' Sherman: 'I rest my case.' (Crack of lightning strikes Sherman on this nearly cloudless day.) Sherman: 'What are the chances of a shark getting struck by lightning?' Ernest: 'Oddly enough, pretty good.'
Jim Toomey’s Sherman’s Lagoon for the 19th of August, 2018. This strip caused me to learn that the comic strip is indeed set in a specific if fictional place, the Kapupu Lagoon, set near the Palau archipelago. I had kind of just figured, you know, ‘The Pacific Ocean somewhere’, but the strip is too ocean-aware to just leave it at that.

But then it’s hard to quantify a low-probability event too. Take the claim that a human has one chance in 3.7 million of being attacked by a shark. We’ll pretend that’s the real number; I don’t know what is. (I’m suspicious of the ‘3-7’. People picking a random two-digit number are surprisingly likely to pick 37 because, I guess, it ‘feels’ random.) Is that over their lifetime? Over a summer? In a single swimming event? In any case it’s such a tiny chance it’s not worth serious worry. But even then, a person who lives in Wisconsin and only ever swims in Lake Michigan has a considerably smaller chance of shark attack than a person from New Jersey who swims at the Shore. At least some of these things are probabilities we can affect.

So the fellow may be irrational, denying himself something he’d enjoy based on a fantastically unlikely event. But he is acting to avoid something he’s decided he doesn’t want to risk. And, you know, we all act irrationally at times, or else I couldn’t justify buying a lottery ticket every eight months or so. Also is Fillmore (the turtle) the person who needs to hear this argument?

Eno: 'I finally got our checkbook to balance, but I had to invent my own kind of math, where zero equals $235.37.'
Gary McCoy and Glenn McCoy’s The Duplex for the 26th of August, 2018. At the risk of taking out my protractor — an old rec.arts.comics.strips quip about trying to demand unreasonable precision in comic strip art, based on a For Better Or For Worse panel where some folks thought a telescope pointed at the wrong part of the sky — why is nothing on Eno’s table there a checkbook?

Gary McCoy and Glenn McCoy’s The Duplex for the 26th is an accounting joke. And a cry about poverty, with the idea that one could make the adding up of one’s assets and debts work only by making mathematics logically inconsistent. Or maybe inconsistent. Arithmetic modulo a particular number could be said to make zero equal to some other number, after all, and that’s all valid. Useful, too, especially in enciphering messages and in generating random numbers. It’s less useful for accounting, though. At least it would draw attention if used unilaterally.

Hayden, thinking about his assignment: 'Ugh. Again. Find x. It's always x. I don't understand this obsession with unmasking x.' (Aloud.) 'Honestly, Miss Hansen, what's wrong with a little mystery in life?'
Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker’s Dustin for the 28th of August, 2018. I’m not sure that Hayden isn’t young enough that the unknown quantity couldn’t be represented with a box or a blank line.

Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker’s Dustin for the 28th is roughly a student-resisting-the-homework problem. From the first panel I thought Hayden might be complaining that ‘x’ was used, once again, as the variable to be solved for. It is the default choice, made because we all grew up learning of ‘x’ as the first choice for a number with a not-yet-known identity. ‘y’ and ‘z’ come in as second and third choices, most likely because they’re quite close to ‘x’. Sometimes another letter stands out, usually because the problem compels it. If the framing of the problem is about when events happen then ‘t’ becomes the default choice. If the problem suggests circular motion then ‘r’ or ‘θ’ — radius and angle — become compelling. But if we know no context, and have only the one variable, then ‘x’ it is. It seems weird to do otherwise.

[ Fi's Math Talk For Schools. ] Fi: 'Numbers are actually about relationships. Take this 'equal' sign. Both sides of the equation must be in balance. One side can't be toxic or abusive.' (Quiet.) Audience question: 'Are we still talking about math?' Fi: 'You'd think all humans could meet a bar that low.'
Bill Holbrook’s On The Fastrack for the 28th of August, 2018. But yeah, this does seem like a curious leap. Misanthropy is one of Fi’s defining characteristics but I can usually follow why she’s gotten from the mathematical to the social.

Bill Holbrook’s On The Fastrack for the 28th is part of a week of Fi talking about mathematics to kids. She occasionally delivers seminars meant to encourage enthusiasm about mathematics. I love the principle although I don’t know how long the effect lasts. (Although it is kind of what I’m doing here. Except I think maybe Fi gets paid.) Holbrook’s strips of this mode often include nice literal depictions of metaphors. This week didn’t offer much chance for that particular artistic play.


I have at least one, and often several, Reading the Comics posts, each week. They should all appear at this link. Other essays with Sherman’s Lagoon will appear at this link when they’re written. I’m surprised to learn that’s a new tag. Essays that mention The Duplex are at this link. Other appearances by Dustin, a character who does not appear in this particular essay’s strips, are at this link. And On The Fastrack mentions should appear at this link. Thank you.

Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

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