Reading the Comics, 1 September 2018: Retirement Of A Tag Edition


I figure to do something rare, and retire one of my comic strip tags after today. Which strip am I going to do my best to drop from Reading the Comics posts? Given how many of the ones I read are short-lived comics that have been rerun three or four times since I started tracking them? Read on and see!

Bill Holbrook’s On The Fastrack for the 29th of August continues the sequence of Fi talking with kids about mathematics. My understanding was that she tried to give talks about why mathematics could be fun. That there are different ways to express the same number seems like a pretty fine-grain detail to get into. But this might lead into some bigger point. That there are several ways to describe the same thing can be surprising and unsettling to discover. That you have, when calculating, the option to switch between these ways freely can be liberating. But you have to know the option is there, and where to look for it. And how to see it’ll make something simpler.

Wendy: 'I never thought Fi would have a talent for teaching.' Dethany: 'It surprised her, too. But something about her demeanor appeals to kids.' (At the class.) Fi: 'See? Two-sixth of a zombie is the same as one-third ... '
Bill Holbrook’s On The Fastrack for the 29th of August, 2018. What … what graphic does she have on-screen?

Bill Holbrook’s On The Fastrack for the 30th of August gets onto a thread about statistics. The point of statistics is to describe something complicated with something simple. So detail must be lost. That said, there are something like 2,038 different things called “average”. Each of them has a fair claim to the term, too. In Fi’s example here, 73 degrees (Fahrenheit) could be called the average as in the arithmetic mean, or average as in the median. The distribution reflects how far and how often the temperature is from 73. This would also be reflected in a quantity called the variance, or the standard deviation. Variance and standard deviation are different things, but they’re tied together; if you know one you know the other. It’s just sometimes one quantity is more convenient than the other to work with.

Fi: 'Numbers don't lie ... but the unscrupulous can get them to say whatever they want. Like when the boss claims the average temperature in your office is 73 degrees when it's really kept at 63 degrees in the winter and 83 degrees in the summer.' Kid: 'Our principal does that.'
Bill Holbrook’s On The Fastrack for the 30th of August, 2018. Somebody nag me sometime to tell the story about when I used Skylab’s torn-away meteorite shield for a heat-flow problem in a differential equations class. Thank you.

Bill Holbrook’s On The Fastrack for the 1st of September has Fi argue that apparent irrelevance makes mathematics boring. It’s a common diagnosis. I think I’ve advanced the claim myself. I remember a 1980s probability textbook asking the chance that two transistors out of five had broken simultaneously. Surely in the earlier edition of the textbook, it was two vacuum tubes out of five. Five would be a reasonable (indeed, common) number of vacuum tubes to have in a radio. And it would be plausible that two might be broken at the same time.

Kid: 'I think math's boring.' Fi: 'That's because you've been taught with 75-year-old word problems. They just need a little updating. ... Like, if your tweet is retweeted by ten people ... who each share it with ten MORE people ... at what point can it be said to go viral?' (Everyone has hands up.)
Bill Holbrook’s On The Fastrack for the 1st of September, 2018. Not to question Holbrook’s writing, since he somehow maintains three successful daily comic strips and may be presumed to know what he’s doing, but shouldn’t this have come before the strip from the 29th?

It seems obvious that wanting to know an answer makes it easier to do the work needed to find it. I’m curious whether that’s been demonstrated true. Like, it seems obvious that a reference to a thing someone doesn’t know anything about would make it harder to work on. But does it? Does it distract someone trying to work out the height of a ziggurat based on its distance and apparent angle, if all they know about a ziggurat is their surmise that it’s a thing whose height we might wish to know?

Randolph's dream: a pirate at a schooldesk. 'Algebra pretty much put pirates out of business.' Teacher: 'If ax^2 + bx + c = 0, what is x?' (The pirate looks at the treasure map, marked x, sweating.' Footer joke: the teacher asks, '15 men on a dead man's chest, yo ho ho, and a bottle of rum equals what?'
Tom Toles’s Randolph Itch, 2 am rerun for the 30th of August, 2018. It originally ran the 13th of January, 2000.

Tom Toles’s Randolph Itch, 2 am rerun for the 30th of August is an old friend that’s been here a couple times. I suppose I do have to retire the strip from my Reading the Comics posts, at least, although I’m still amused enough by it to keep reading it daily. Simon Garfield’s On The Map, a book about the history of maps, notes that the X-marks-the-spot thing is an invention of the media. Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island particularly. Stevenson’s treasure map, Garfield notes, had to be redrawn from the manuscript and the author’s notes. The original went missing in the mail to the publishers. I just mention because I think that adds a bit of wonder to the treasure map. And since, I guess, I won’t have the chance to mention this again.

Kid: 'Mom, Dad, why do you have a giant inflatable Klein bottle hidden in the closet?' Mom: 'Compromise. I'll say nothing more. NOW GO WASH YOUR HANDS.' Underneath, a Venn diagram, with one bubble 'Having Sex Inside', the other 'Having Sex Outside', and the intersection 'Having Sex Near A Non-Orientable Surface'.
Zach Weinersmith’s Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal for the 30th of August, 2018. Interesting to me is that either the panel comic by itself, or the Venn diagram by itself, would be a sufficient joke. The panel would be a cryptic one, one that probably attracted ‘I don’t get it’ responses, but it’d be decipherable. The Venn Diagram one would be fine, but wouldn’t have the tension and energy of the full strip.

Zach Weinersmith’s Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal for the 30th of August satisfies the need for a Venn Diagram joke this time around. It’s also the strange-geometry joke for the week. Klein bottles were originally described by Felix Klein. They exist in four (or more) dimensions, in much the way that M&oum;bius strips exist in three. And like the M&oum;bius strip the surface defies common sense. You can try to claim some spot on the surface is inside and some other spot outside. But you can get from your inside to your outside spot in a continuous path, one you might trace out on the surface without lifting your stylus.

If you were four-dimensional. Or more. If we were to see one in three dimensions we’d see a shape that intersects itself. As beings of only three spatial dimensions we have to pretend that doesn’t happen. It’s the same we we pretend a drawing of a cube shows six squares all of equal size and connected at right angles to one another, even though the drawing is nothing like that. The bottle-like shape Weinersmith draws is, I think, the most common representation of the Klein bottle. It looks like a fancy bottle, and you can buy one as a novelty gift for a mathematician. I don’t need one but do thank you for thinking of me. MathWorld shows another representation, a figure-eight-based one which looks to me like an advanced pasta noodle. But it doesn’t look anything like a bottle.

Abstract's Bar and Grille. Once again, Eric the Circle's pick-up line backfires ... and he is left confused and speechless. Eric: 'You're acutey. What's your sign?' Triangle: 'Opposite over hypotenuse. What's yours?'
Eric the Circle for the 31st of August, 2018. … Shouldn’t this be with a right triangle?

Eric the Circle for the 31st of August, this one by JohnG, is a spot of wordplay. The pun here is the sine of an angle in a (right) triangle. That would be the length of the leg opposite the angle divided by the length of the hypotenuse. This is still stuff relevant to circles, though. One common interpretation of the cosine and sine of an angle is to look at the unit circle. That is, a circle with radius 1 and centered on the origin. Draw a line segment opening up an angle θ from the positive x-axis. Draw it counterclockwise. That is, if your angle is a very small number, you’re drawing a line segment that’s a little bit above the positive x-axis. Draw the line segment long enough that it touches the unit circle. That point where the line segment and the circle intersect? Look at its Cartesian coordinates. The y-coordinate will be the sine of θ. The x-coordinate will be the cosine of θ. The triangle you’re looking at has vertices at the origin; at x-coordinate cosine θ, y-coordinate 0; and at x-coordinate cosine θ, y-coordinate sine θ.

[ When Zippy was three, he said the darnedest things ] Zippy: 'X plus Y divided by Shirley Booth equals Soft Serve.' [ At the age of 11, he continued to amaze and impress his parents. ] 'If I had the powers of Spider-Man and the costume of Mighty Mouse, I could understand algebra!' [ He mellowed a bit at 16 and thought deep thoughts about the universe and stuff. ] 'If you lined up ALL the jars of Bosco ever manufactured, they'd form a ring all the way around the Earth and wind up conking Einstein on the bean in Newark!' [ As a ADULT, Zippy knows that not everyone appreciates his surreal spoutings, so he often muses to himself. ] Zippy, thinking: 'If I drew Mary Worth, she'd drive a 1958 two-tone Metro!'
Bill Griffith’s Zippy the Pinhead for the 1st of September, 2018. Somebody nag me sometime to save that last panel for my next What’s Going On In Mary Worth plot recap.

Bill Griffith’s Zippy the Pinhead for the 1st of September is its usual sort of nonsense, the kind that’s up my alley. It does spend two panels using arithmetic and algebra as signifiers of intelligence, or at least thoughtfulness.


My other Reading the Comics posts should appear at this link. Other essays with On The Fastrack are at this link. The essays that mentioned Randolph Itch, 2 am, are at this link, and I suppose this will be the last of them. We’ll see if I do succeed in retiring the tag. Other appearances by Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal are at this link. The strip comes up here a lot. Eric the Circle comics should be at this link. And other essays with Zippy the Pinhead mentions should be at this link. Thank you.

Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

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