Reading the Comics, November 7, 2018: Shorthand and Reruns Edition


There’s two types of comics for the second of last week’s review. There’s some strips that are reruns. There’s some that just use mathematics as a shorthand for something else. There’s four strips in all.

John Deering’s Strange Brew for the 6th uses mathematics as shorthand for demonstrating intelligence. There’s no making particular sense out of the symbols, of course. And I’d think it dangerous that Lucky seems to be using both capital X and lowercase x in the same formula. There’s often times one does use the capital and lowercase versions of a letter in a formula. This is usually something like “x is one element of the set X, which is all the possible candidates for some thing”. In that case, you might get the case wrong, but context would make it clear what you meant. But, yes, sometimes there’s no sensible alternative and then you have to be careful.

Person upstairs: 'I don't understand how Lucky keeps getting out.' Lucky, the dog, is downstairs, writing out plans: 'V_1 Q_q = X'^4 y / B(4) x^2'
John Deering’s Strange Brew for the 6th of November, 2018. The mathematics is all fine but have they considered they never did close the patio door?

Randy Glasbergen’s Glasbergen Cartoons for the 6th uses mathematics as shorthand for a hard subject. It’s certainly an economical notation. Alas, you don’t just learn from your mistakes. You learn from comparing your mistakes to a correct answer. And thinking about why you made the mistakes you did, and how to minimize or avoid those mistakes again.

Student, to teacher: 'If we learn from our mistakes, shouldn't I make as many mistakes as possible?' On the blackboard is the problem 473 x 17.
Randy Glasbergen’s Glasbergen Cartoons for the 6th of November, 2018. The strip is a rerun, but I have no information to date when it’s from.

So how would I do this problem? Well, carrying out the process isn’t too hard. But what do I expect the answer to be, roughly? To me, I look at this and reason: 473 is about 500. So 473 x 17 is about 500 x 17. 500 x 17 is 1000 times eight-and-a-half. So start with “about 8500”. That’s too high, obviously. I can do better. 8500 minus some correction. What correction? Well, 473 is roughly 500 minus 25. So I’ll subtract 25 times 17. Which isn’t hard, because 25 times 4 is 100. So 25 times 17? That’s 25 times 16 plus 25 times 1. 25 times 16 is 100 times 4. So 25 times 17 is 425. 8500 minus 425 is 8075. I’m still a bit high, by 2 times 17. 2 times 17 is 34. So subtract 34 from 8075: it should be about 8041.

Student taking a test: 'Which of these is a right triangle?' (Figures a, b, and c.) Maria's answer: 'c is right. a is left. b is middle.'
John Zakour and Scott Roberts’s Maria’s Day for the 7th of November, 2018. Kind of curious whether this is meant to have one correct answer or an unspecified number of correct answers, since both ‘b’ and ‘c’ look plausibly like right triangles to me.

John Zakour and Scott Roberts’s Maria’s Day for the 7th is a joke built on jargon. Every field has its jargon. Some of it will be safely original terms: people’s names (“Bessel function”) or synthetic words (“isomorphism”) that can’t be easily confused with everyday language. But some of it will be common terms given special meaning. “Right” angles and “right” triangles. “Normal” numbers. “Group”. “Right” as a description for angles and triangles goes back a long way, at least to — well, Merriam-Webster.com says 15th century. But EtymologyOnline says late 14th century. Neither offers their manuscripts. I’ll chalk it up to differences in how they interpret the texts. And possibly differences in whether they would count, say, a reference to “a right angle” written in French or German rather than in English directly.

Literary Calendar. Several jokes, including: Saturday 7pm: an infinite number of chimpanzees discuss their multi-volume 'Treasury of Western Literature with no Typos' at the Museum of Natural History. Nit picking to follow.
Richard Thompson’s Richard’s Poor Almanac rerun for the 7th of November, 2016.

Richard Thompson’s Richard’s Poor Almanac for the 7th has been run before. It references the Infinite Monkey Theorem. The monkeys this time around write up a treasury of Western Literature, not merely the canon of Shakespeare. That’s at least as impressive a feat. Also, while this is a rerun — sad to say Richard Thompson died in 2016, and was forced to retire from drawing before that — his work was fantastic and deserves attention.


This and every Reading the Comics post should be at this link. Essays discussing topics raised by Strange Brew are at this link. The essays discussing Glasbergen Cartoons are at this link. Essays which mention Maria’s Day, are at this link. And essays featuring Richard’s Poor Almanac are at this link.

My Fall 2018 Mathematics A-To-Z averages two new posts a week, through the end of December. Thanks again for reading.

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Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

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