Reading the Comics, December 5, 2018: December 5, 2018 Edition


And then I noticed there were a bunch of comic strips with some kind of mathematical theme on the same day. Always fun when that happens.

Bill Holbrook’s On The Fastrack uses one of Holbrook’s common motifs. That’s the depicting as literal some common metaphor. in this case it’s “massaging the numbers”, which might seem not strictly mathematics. But while numbers are interesting, they’re also useful. To be useful they must connect to something we want to know. They need context. That context is always something of human judgement. If the context seems inappropriate to the listener, she thinks the presenter is massaging the numbers. If the context seems fine, we trust the numbers as showing something truth.

A man making a report touches a figure 8, reducing it to a wobbly mess. He finally has several wrinkled, flattened numbers dangling over the 'screen' edge. Fi: 'You massage these numbers, didn't you?' Man: 'No! They're naturally relaxed!'
Bill Holbrook’s On The Fastrack for the 5th of December, 2018. Essays inspired by On The Fastrack appear at this link.

Scott Hilburn’s The Argyle Sweater is a seasonal pun that couldn’t wait for a day closer to Christmas. I’m a little curious why not. It would be the same joke with any subject, certainly. The strip did make me wonder if Ebeneezer Scrooge, in-universe, might have taken calculus. This lead me to see that it’s a bit vague what, precisely, Scrooge, or Scrooge-and-Marley, did. The movies are glad to position him as having a warehouse, and importing and exporting things, and making and collecting on loans and whatnot. These are all trades that mathematicians would like to think benefit from knowing advanced mathematics. The logic of making loans implies attention be paid to compounding interest, risks, and expectation values, as well as projecting cash-flow a fair bit into the future. But in the original text he doesn’t make any stated loans, and the only warehouse anyone enters is Fezziwig’s. Well, the Scrooge and Marley sign stands “above the warehouse door”, but we only ever go in to the counting-house. And yes, what Scrooge does besides gather money and misery is irrelevant to the setting of the story.

Caption: 'Young Ebeneezer Scrooge gets a visit from the Ghost of Calculus Passed.' The Ghost holds up a D+ paper, terrifying Scrooge in his bed. The Ghost: 'If you'd only studied you could've gotten a C.'
Scott Hilburn’s The Argyle Sweater for the 5th of December, 2018. Some of the many times I’ve talked about The Argyle Sweater appear at this link.

Teresa Burritt’s Dadaist strip Frog Applause uses knowledge of mathematics as an emblem of intelligence. “Multivariate analysis” is a term of art from statistics. It’s about measuring how one variable changes depending on two or more other variables. The goal is obvious: we know there are many things that influence anything of interest. Can we find what things have the strongest effects? The weakest effects? There are several ways we might mean “strongest” effect, too. It might mean that a small change in the independent variable produces a big change in the dependent one. Or it might mean that there’s very little noise, that a change in the independent variable produces a reliable change in the dependent one. Or we might have several variables that are difficult to measure precisely on their own, but with a combination that’s noticeable. The basic calculations for this look a lot like those for single-variable analysis. But there’s much more calculation. It’s more tedious, at least. My reading suggests that multivariate analysis didn’t develop much until there were computers cheap enough to do the calculations. Might be coincidence, though. Many machine-learning techniques can be described as multivariate analysis problems.

Caption: 'She knew she was smarter than he was, but she married him anyway.' Clip-art woman comforting a seated man; 'Look at it this way. If you don't know what a multivariate analysis is, you probably can't do one.'
Teresa Burritt’s Frog Applause for the 5th of December, 2018. Essays with reason to mention Frog Applause should be at this link.

Greg Evans’s Luann Againn is a Pi Day joke from before the time when Pi Day was a thing. Brad’s magazine flipping like that is an unusual bit of throwaway background humor for the comic strip.

Luann: 'Brad, how much is 'pi'?' Brad: 'A whole one or just a slice?'
Greg Evans’s Luann Againn for the 5th of December, 2018. This originally ran the 5th of December, 1990. Essays which mention Luann, current-day or 1990-vintage rerun, appear at this link.

Doug Savage’s Savage Chickens is a bunch of shape jokes. Since I was talking about tiling the plane so recently the rhombus seemed on-point enough. I’m think the irregular heptagon shown here won’t tile the plane. But given how much it turns out I didn’t know, I wouldn’t want to commit to that.

Title: Ninja Weapons in descending Order of Effectiveness. Ninja Star; Ninja Rhombus; Ninja Irregular Heptagon; Ninja Sturgeon.
Doug Savage’s Savage Chickens for the 5th of December, 2018. Essays that mention Savage Chickens are at this link.

I’m working hard on a latter ‘X’ essay for my Fall 2018 Mathematics A To Z glossary. That should appear on Friday. And there should be another Reading the Comics post later this week, at this link.

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Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

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