Reading the Comics, February 2, 2019: Not The February 1, 2019 Edition


The last burst of mathematically-themed comic strips last week nearly all came the 1st of the month. But the count fell just short. I can only imagine what machinations at Comic Strip Master Command went wrong, that we couldn’t get a full four comics for the same day. Well, life is messy and things will happen.

Stephen Bentley’s Herb and Jamaal for the 1st is a rerun. I discussed it last time I noticed it too. I’d previously taken Herb to be gloating about not using the calculus he’d studied. I may be reading too much into what seems like a smirk in the final panel, though. Could be he’s thinking of the strangeness that something which, at the time, is challenging and difficult and all-consuming turns out to not be such a big deal. Which could be much of high school.

Herb, sitting at his counter, thinking: 'Man, can you believe it? Another year has passed and I still haven't used the calculus I studied in high school.' (He smirks.)
Stephen Bentley’s Herb and Jamaal for the 1st of February, 2019. It previously ran the 25th of November, 2013. Essays that mention Herb and Jamaal should be at this link. Although, it happens, the last time this ran was before I started tagging comic strips by name. Whoops?

But my first instinct is still to read this as thinking of the “uselessness” of calculus. It betrays the terrible attitude that education is about job training. It should be about letting people be literate in the world’s great thoughts. Mathematics seems to get this attitude a lot, but I’m aware I may feel a confirmation bias. If I had become a French major perhaps I’d pay attention to all the comic strips where someone giggles about how they never use the foreign languages they learned in high school either.

Mathpinion City, Numerically Flexible Zones. Minion holding sign reading 1+1=3: 'Haters, man.' Another minion: 'Can't stand 'em.' 'It's all the hate hate hatet hate.' 'It always is with their kind. The hating kind.' 'I mean, the *logic* is sound.' 'You can't argue with the *logic*.' 'But still, they're total a-holes.' (Looking at minions holding up signs reading 1+1=2.) 'Just because they're right they think they can be a-holes about it.' 'Well they *can't*.' 'Technically, they can. They're right about that too.'
Jon Rosenberg’s Scenes from a Multiverse for the 1st of February, 2019. Essays with some discussion sparked by Scenes from a Multiverse are at this link.

Jon Rosenberg’s Scenes from a Multiverse for the 1st is set in a “Mathpinion City”, showing people arguing about mathematical truths. It seems to me a political commentary, about the absurdity of rejecting true things over perceived insults. The 1+1=3 partisans aren’t even insisting they’re right, just that the other side is obnoxious. Arithmetic here serves as good source for things that can’t be matters of opinion, at least provided we’ve agreed on what’s meant by ideas like ‘1’ and ‘3’.

Mathematics is a human creation, though. What we decide to study, and what concepts we think worth interesting, are matters of opinion. It’s difficult to imagine people who think 1+1=2 a statement so unimportant they don’t care whether it’s true or false. At least not ones who reason anything like we do. But that is our difficulty, not a constraint on what life could think.

Student looks at a quiz. It's full of expressions, presumably to simplify, such as [a^2 b^2/16m] x [(m^2(25^2)x24m) / (16^{-2} \delta m]. He prays. There's tapping at the window. God appears, in a tree, pointing to an answer key. The teacher runs over, 'Hey!', scaring God out of the tree.
Neil Kohney’s The Other End for the 1st of February, 2019. I thought this might be a new tag, but no. I’ve discussed The Other End at some essays linked here.

Neil Kohney’s The Other End for the 1st has a mathematics cameo. It’s the subject of a quiz so difficult that the kid begs for God’s help sorting it out. The problems all seem to be simplifying expressions. It’s a skill worth having. There are infinitely many ways to write the same quantity. Some of them are more convenient than others. Brief expressions, for example, are often easier to understand. But a longer expression might let us tease out relationships that are good to know. Many analysis proofs end up becoming simpler when you multiply by one — that is, multiplying by and dividing by the same quantity, but using the numerator to reduce one part of the expression and the denominator to reduce some other. Or by adding zero, in which you add and subtract a quantity and use either side to simplify other parts of the expression. So, y’know, just do the work. It’s better that way.

The teacher's put on the board 4 x 6 = 24 and 24 / 6 = 4. Wavehead: 'I understand how it works. But if we're just going to end up back at four, what was the point?'
Mark Anderson’s Andertoons for the 2nd of February, 2019. I’ve discussed Andertoons in so many essays like this you might think I was Mark Anderson’s publicity agent, but that I had an extremely narrow focus of what I thought marketable.

Mark Anderson’s Andertoons for the 2nd is the Mark Anderson’s Andertoons for the week. Wavehead’s learning about invertible operations: that a particular division can undo a multiplication. Or, presumably, that a particular multiplication can undo a division. Fair to wonder why you’d want to do that, though. Most of the operations we use in arithmetic have inverses, or come near it. (There’s one thing you can multiply by which you can’t divide out.) The term used in group theory for this is to say the real numbers are a “field”. This is a ring in which not just does addition have an inverse, but so does multiplication. And the operations commute; dividing by four and multiplying by four is as good as multiplying by for and dividing by four. You can build interesting mathematical structures that don’t have some of these properties. Elementary-school division, where you might describe (say) 26 divided by 4 as “6 with a remainder of 2” is one of them.


And that covers the comic strips. Come Sunday should be the next of this series, and it should be at this link.

Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

2 thoughts on “Reading the Comics, February 2, 2019: Not The February 1, 2019 Edition”

  1. I appreciated this post. There are important philosophical points raised here imo, especially the institutionalized thinking that sees education merely as job training. I was lucky to attend college in the days when the primary purpose of higher education was to teach you how to think. It was the best career preparation that I could have had.

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    1. Thank you kindly. As usually happens now that I’ve said something I feel like I need to soften it. I realized that a school system that doesn’t teach some practical things is also doing things wrong. People should know how to cook, to sew, to fix a hole in the drywall, to replace a bad washer in the sink faucet, and other things. And after a weekend’s reflection I’ve realized the obvious reason that’s different. Those things are about giving a person tools that can make their lives less hard. They’re not about making a person a lower-hiring-cost for a company.

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