Reading the Comics, March 30, 2019: Comics Kingdom is Screwed Up Edition


It doesn’t affect much this batch of comics, as they’re a bunch that all came from GoComics.com. But Comics Kingdom suffered a major redesign of the web site this week, and so it’s lost a lot of functionality. The ability to load your whole comics page at once, for example. Or the ability of archives to work. I’d had the URL for one strip copied down because it mentioned mathematics, albeit in so casual a manner I didn’t mean to write a paragraph about it. Good luck that I didn’t, as that URL now directs to a Spanish translation of a Katzenjammer Kids strip. Why? That’s a good question, and one that deserves an answer.

Anyway, I’m hoping that Comics Kingdom is able to get over their redesign soon. But I know they won’t. There’s never been a web site redesign that lowered functionality and made the page more infuriating to work with that was ever abandoned for the older, working version instead.

Enough about Comics Kingdom. Let me share a couple comic strips from a web site that works, although not as well as it did before its 2018 redesign.

Jim Meddick’s Monty for the 27th is part of a fun storyline. In it Monty and Moondog’s cell phones start texting on their own. It’s presented as the start of an Artificial Intelligence-based singularity, computers transcending human thought and going into business for themselves. This is shown by their working out mathematical truths, starting with arithmetic and going into Boolean algebra. Humans learn arithmetic first and Boolean algebra — logical statements and their combinations — later on, if ever.

Monty: 'Doc! Glad you're here! Our phones started texting without us!' Moondog: 'Now they're doing math!' (The phones text '2 x 2 = 4' and '4^4 = 256'.) Monty: 'They started with 2x2 = 4'. Professor Xemit: 'And now they're swapping advanced Boolean algebraic operations!' Monty: 'Doc ... what's going on?' Xemit: 'A dangerous nexus of AI has formed in your devices! And it must be stopped before it surpasses the combined intellect of all humanity!' Moondog: 'Not sure what that means, but it sounds like some serious data charges.'
Jim Meddick’s Monty for the 27th of March, 2019. Essays discussing anything from Monty should appear at this link.

Computers are certainly able to discover mathematics on their own. Or at least without close guidance; someone still has to write a program to do it. Automated proof finders are a well-established thing, though. They have not, so far as I’ve heard, discovered anything likely to threaten humanity.

Prisoner number 81861^3, talking to prisoner 3757^5: 'Man, this is one *big* prison!'
Brian Boychuk and Ron Boychuk’s The Chuckle Brothers for the 28th of March, 2019. Appearances of The Chuckle Brothers in this line of essays should be gathered here.

Brian Boychuk and Ron Boychuk’s The Chuckle Brothers for the 28th is built on representing huge numbers. 818613 is a big number: 548,568,842,280,381. Even bigger is 37575: it’s 748,524,423,279,410,560. It’s silly to imagine needing an identification number that large. But it’s also a remarkable coincidence that both prisoners here have numbers that can be represented with no more than six digits. There aren’t so many 15-digit numbers that could be represented with as few as six digits. But then it would be an absurdly large prison if it “only” had 818,613 prisoners in it. That seems like the joke would have been harder to recognize, though.

Anthropomorphic numeral 9, looking at temperatures on the Weather Channel. Caption: 'Nate wanted to work at the Weather Channel but didn't have a degree.'
Mark Parisi’s Off The Mark for the 28th of March, 2019. Essays inspired by something mentioned in Off The Mark should be gathered here.

Mark Parisi’s Off The Mark for the 28th is sort of the anthropomorphic numerals joke for the week. It’s also a joke for my friend with the meteorology degree, who I think doesn’t actually read these posts. Well, he probably got the comic forwarded to him anyway.

Daniel Beyer’s Long Story Short for the 29th is another prison joke. I’m not sure if someone at Comic Strip Master Command was worried about something. But a scrawl of mathematics is used as icon of skills learned in prison.

Prisoner, to the other in his cell: 'You learn new skills after being here awhile.' On his wall are several lines of mathematical scrawls.
Daniel Beyer’s Long Story Short for the 29th of March, 2019. Essays discussing topics raised by Long Story Short should be here. There aren’t many, yet.

Mathematics has the reputation of being a subject someone can still do useful work in while in prison. Maybe even do more work, as it seems to offer the prospect of undistracted time to think. And there are examples of mathematicians doing noteworthy work while imprisoned. Bertrand Russell wrote the Introduction To Mathematical Philosophy while jailed for protesting the First World War. André Weil advanced his work in arithmetic geometry while in prison for resisting service in the Second World War. Évariste Galois spent six months in prison shortly before the end of his life, and used some of the time to work on the theory of equations for which we still remember him. I would not recommend prison as a way to advance one’s mathematical research. But it’s something which could happen.

Colin, showing a card: 'Check it out, Dad! This is one of the most powerful Spen-Yo-Do Cards, the Crystal Conquerer! It's worth 2500 power units, has a multiplier ratio of 10, and a destruction ratio of 2 over 15! It can only be defeated by a mage card of equal value or greater!' Dad: 'That's fine, Colin, but I came to check your homework. C'mon, what's 9 divided by 3?' Colin: 'How am I supposed to know?!'
Terry LaBan and Patty LaBan’s Edge City rerun for the 30th of March, 2019. It originally ran in 2004; I can’t say whether it ran the 30th of March then. And topics raised by Edge City should be discussed at this link.

Terry LaBan and Patty LaBan’s Edge City for the 30th showcases the motivation problem. Colin, like many people, is easily able to do complicated algorithms to do something he likes doing. Arithmetic drills, though, not so much. This is why we end up writing story problems with dubious amounts of story in them.


And I don’t want to devote too much space to this. But Brian Fies’s The Last Mechanical Monster for the 29th included the lead character, the Mad Scientist, working out the numbers of the Fibonacci sequence as a way to keep his mind going. The strip is a rerun and I discussed it when it first ran on GoComics.


There were quite a lot of mathematically-themed comic strips the week of the 24th of March. I’ll get to the actual strips of the past week soon, at this link. Also if anyone knows a way to get the old Comics Kingdom back please let me know.

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Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

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