Reading the Comics, February 1, 2020: I Never Talk About Marvin Edition


There’s some comic strips that get mentioned here all the time. Then there’s comic strips that I have been reading basically my whole life, and that never give me a thread to talk about. Although I’ve been reading comic strips for their mathematics content for a long while now, somehow, I am still surprised when these kinds of comic strip are not the same thing. So here’s the end of last week’s comics, almost in time for next week to start:

Kevin Fagan’s Drabble for the 28th has Penny doing “math” on colors. Traditionally I use an opening like this to mention group theory. In that we study things that can be added together, in ways like addition works on the integers. Colors won’t quite work like this, unfortunately. A group needs an element that’s an additive identity. This works like zero: it can be added to anything without changing its value. There isn’t a color that you can mix with other colors that leaves the other color unchanged, though. Even white or clear will dilute the original color.

Mom: 'How was school today, Penny?' Penny: 'Great, Mommy! I learned how to do math! Want me to show you? Blue plus red equals purple!'
Kevin Fagan’s Drabble for the 28th of January, 2020. It doesn’t come up often, but when it does, Drabble appears in essays at this link.

If you’ve thought of the clever workaround, that each color can be the additive identity to itself, you get credit for ingenuity. Unfortunately, to be a group there has to be a lone additive identity. Having more than one makes a structure that’s so unlike the integers that mathematicians won’t stand for it. I also don’t know of any interesting structures that have more than one additive identity. This suggests that nobody has found a problem that they represent well. But the strip suggests maybe it could tell us something useful for colors. I don’t know.

Marvin: 'After all the talk about 'fake news' I'm starting to question EVERYTHING big people tell me.' He's looking at a teacher holding up the flashcard 1 + 1 = 2.
Tom Armstrong’s Marvin for the 28th of January, 2020. I don’t think it has ever come up before, but what the heck. Any essays which mention Marvin should be at this link.

Tom Armstrong’s Marvin for the 28th is a strip which follows from the discovery that “fake news” is a thing that people say. Here the strip uses a bit of arithmetic as the sort of incontrovertibly true thing that Marvin is dumb to question. Well, that 1 + 1 equals 2 is uncontrovertibly true, unless we are looking at some funny definitions of ‘1’ or ‘plus’ or something. I remember, as a kid, being quite angry with a book that mentioned “one cup of popcorn plus one cup of water does not give us two cups of soggy popcorn”, although I didn’t know how to argue the point.

Title: 'The Math Homework.' Dad, in the kitchen, to kid: 'What's surface area? Ask your mother.' The mother is in the kitchen, working, and has every bit of surface area that isn't being used for homework with cooking tools. Footer joke: Mom asks, 'Can you please move? I need this space.'
Hilary Price and Rina Piccolo’s Rhymes with Orange for the 30th of January, 2020. Essays with some mention of Rhymes With Orange should be at this link.

Hilary Price and Rina Piccolo’s Rhymes with Orange for the 30th is … well, I’m in this picture and I don’t like it. I come from a long line of people who cover every surface with stuff. But as for what surface area is? … Well, there’s a couple of possible definitions. One that I feel is compelling is to think of covering sets. Take a shape that’s set, by definition, to have an area of 1 unit of area. What is the smallest number of those unit shapes which will cover the original shape? Cover is a technical term here. But also, here, the ordinary English word describes what we need it for. How many copies of the unit shape do you need to exactly cover up the whole original shape? That’s your area. And this fits to the mother’s use of surfaces in the comic strip neatly enough.

Mutt: 'What's the matter, you stuck?' Jeff, looking at his car: 'Yes and no! I tried the cary products they advertise on TV. They claimed this car would use 50% less gas. Then I bought a carburettor which saves 30%, special spark plugs which save 20% and a new brand of gas which saved 10%! Now when I drive the gas tank overflows!' Jeff shows gas pouring out of the tank.
Bud Fisher’s Mutt and Jeff for the 31st of January, 2020. And the essays which have mentioned Mutt and Jeff comics appear at this link.

Bud Fisher’s Mutt and Jeff for the 31st is a rerun of vintage unknown to me. I’m not sure whether it’s among the digitally relettered strips. The lettering’s suspiciously neat, but, for example, there’s at least three different G’s in there. Anyway, it’s an old joke about adding together enough gas-saving contraptions that it uses less than zero gas. So far as it’s tenable at all, it comes from treating percentage savings from different schemes as additive, instead of multiplying together. Also, I suppose, that the savings are independent, that (in this case) Jeff’s new gas saving ten percent still applies even with the special spark plugs or the new carburettor [sic]. The premise is also probably good for a word problem, testing out understanding of percentages and multiplication, which is just a side observation here.


This wraps up last week’s mathematically-themed comic strips. This week I can tell you already was a bonanza week. When I start getting to its comics I should have an essay at this link. Thanks for reading.

Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

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