Reading the Comics, February 14, 2020: Simple Edition


Greg Evans’s Luann Againn for the 12th features some poor tutoring on Gunther’s part. Usually a person isn’t stuck for what the answer to a problem is; they’re stuck on how to do it correctly. Maybe on how to do it efficiently. But tutoring is itself a skill, and it’s a hard one to learn. We don’t get enough instruction in how to do it.

The problem Luann’s doing is one of simplifying an expression. I remember doing a lot of this, in middle school algebra like that. Simplifying expressions does not change their value; we don’t create new ideas by writing them. So why simplify?

Any grammatically correct expression for a concept may be as good as any other grammatically correct expression. This is as true in writing as it is in mathematics. So what is good writing? There are a thousand right answers. One trait that I think most good writing has is that it makes concepts feel newly accessible. It frames something in a way which makes ideas easier to see. So it is with simplifying algebraic expressions. Finding a version of a formula that makes clearer what you would like to do makes the formula more useful.

Gunther: 'OK, let's see what you did wrong here on number 26.' Luann notices Aaron Hill walking past, and goes out to follow him. Meanwhile Gunther works out 'Simplify: 6x + 7(3 + x + 4)'. After Luann's gone through several rooms following Aaron, Gunther calls out, 'The answer is 13x + 49!' Luann: 'What? Oh! OK, thanks!'
Greg Evans’s Luann Againn for the 12th of February, 2020. The strip originally ran the 12th of February, 1992. Essays mentioning something inspired by Luann, either the current run or the 1992-vintage Luann Againn reruns, are at this link.

Simplifying like this, putting an expression into the fewest number of terms, is common. It typically makes it easier to calculate with a formula. We calculate with formulas all the time. It often makes it easier to compare one formula to another. We compare formulas some of the time. So we practice simplifying like this a lot. Occasionally we’ll have a problem where this simplification is counter-productive and we’d do better to write out something as, to make up an example, 4(x^2 + 2x + 1)^2 + 4(x^2 + 2x + 1) + 1 instead. Someone who’s gotten good at simplifications, to the point it doesn’t take very much work, is likely to spot cases where one wants to keep part of the expression un-simplified.

Chen Weng’s Messycow Comics for the 13th starts off with some tut-tutting of lottery players. Objectively, yes, money put on a lottery ticket is wasted; even, for example, pick-three or pick-four daily games are so unlikely to pay any award as to be worth it. But I cannot make myself believe that this is necessarily a more foolish thing to do with a couple dollars than, say, buying a candy bar or downloading a song you won’t put on any playlists.

Woman, looking at people buying lottery tickets: 'I feel sorry for them.' Cow: 'Why?' Woman: 'Because, statistically, their chances are so slim that they're wasting their money.' Later, Cow: 'Let's go play!' Woman: 'Can't, need to work.' Cow: 'Why?' Woman: 'Because I want to become a successful artist and give my family a good life.' Cow: 'You know, statistically, your chance is so slim that you are wasting your time.' This word balloon stabs the woman between the eyes.
Chen Weng’s Messycow Comics for the 13th of February, 2020. The occasional essay mentioning something raised by Messycow Comics appear at this link.

And as the Cow points out, the chance of financial success in art — in any creative field — is similarly ridiculously slight. Even skilled people need a stroke of luck to make it, and even then, making it is a marginal matter. (There is a reason I haven’t quit my job to support myself by blog-writing.) People are terrible at estimating probabilities, especially in situations that are even slightly complicated.

Teacher: 'So what is 3 times 55?' Looking out over a bunch of students, many with hands up. One with her hand way up, several feet taller than anyone else's. Gracie's hand is this; she's got a fake extra-long arm on a stick and waves that. Other students near her look at her and glare.
Hector D. Cantü and Carlos Castellanos’s Baldo for the 14th of February, 2020. Essays featuring something mentioned by Baldo appear at this link.

Hector D. Cantü and Carlos Castellanos’s Baldo for the 14th just has Gracie very enthusiastic for arithmetic class. It’s a cute bit.


And now I’m all caught up. Please check in this link next week as I read the comics for their mathematics content some more.

Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

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