Reading the Comics, December 20, 1948: What is Barnaby’s friend’s name Edition?


Have a special one today. I’ve been reading a compilation of Crockett Johnson’s 1940s comic Barnaby. The title character, an almost too gentle child, follows his fairy godfather Mr O’Malley into various shenanigans. Many (the best ones, I’d say) involve the magical world. The steady complication is that Mr O’Malley boasts abilities beyond his demonstrated competence. (Although most of the magic characters are shown to be not all that good at their business.) It’s a gentle strip and everything works out all right, if farcically.

This particular strip comes from a late 1948 storyline. Mr O’Malley’s gone missing, coincidentally to a fairy cop come to arrest the pixie, who is a con artist at heart. So this sees the entry of Atlas, the Mental Giant, who’s got some pleasant gimmicks. One of them is his requiring mnemonics built on mathematical formulas to work out names. And this is a charming one, with a great little puzzle: how do you get A-T-L-A-S out of the formula Atlas has remembered?

While Barnaby and Jane look on a Fairy Cop asks: 'Sergeant Ausdauer is the name. With a baffling problem. Baffling for the police, that is. But I'm sure that if a Mental Giant like you, sir, will apply his direct scientific mind to --- ' Atlas: 'Eh? How do you do. My name is --- er --- my name is --- er --- Where's my slide rule?' While he works on this Jane says to Barnaby, 'He forgot his name.' Atlas mutters: '(U - TS) * det( -dT^2 S \ e^{i*pi} zeta(0) L) = ... ' Walking off panel, Atlas says, 'A-T-L-A-S --- my name is Atlas. I never forget a name. With my memory system --- good day. Sorry to have bothered you --- ' Barnaby, calling him back: 'Hey! Wait!'
Crockett Johnson and Jack Morley’s Barnaby for the 20th of December, 1948. (Morley drew the strip at this point.) I haven’t had cause to discuss other Barnaby strips but if I do, I’ll put them in an essay here. Sergeant Ausdauer reasons that “one of those upper-class amateur detectives with scientific minds who solve all the problems for Scotland Yard” could get him through this puzzle. If they were in London they could just ring any doorbell … which gives you a further sense of the comic strip’s sensibility.

I’m sorry the solution requires a bit of abusing notation, so please forgive it. But it’s a fun puzzle, especially as the joke would not be funnier if the formula didn’t work. I’m always impressed when a comic strip goes to that extra effort.

Johnson, who also wrote the Harold and the Purple Crayon books, painted over a hundred canvasses with theorem-based pictures. There’s a selection of them at the Smithsonian Institute’s web site, here.

Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

3 thoughts on “Reading the Comics, December 20, 1948: What is Barnaby’s friend’s name Edition?”

Please Write Something Good

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.