How March 2022 Treated My Mathematics Blog


I expected readers to be happy I was finishing the Little 2021 Mathematics A-to-Z. My doubt was how happy they would be. Turns out they were a middling amount of happy. So this is my regular review of the readership statistics for the past month, as provided by WordPress.

I published eight things in March, which is average for me the past twelve months. It was a long, long time ago that I went whole months posting something every day. But my twelve-month running mean has been 8.5 posts per month, and the median 8, so that’s just in line. There were 2,272 page views recorded in March, which is below the running mean of 2,336.4 and above the running median of 2,122. So, average, like I said. There were 1,545 unique visitors, below the running mean of 1,640.0 and above the running median of 1,479.

Bar chart of two and a half years' worth of monthly readership figures. There was a huge peak around October 2019, and a much lower but fairly steady wave of readership after that. It's slightly increased for January 2022, dropped for February, and rose slightly for March.
It’s uncanny how well this chart matches my mood.

Prorated by posting, the showing is a little worse. There were 284.0 views and 193.1 unique visitors per posting in March. The running mean is 301.9 views and 211.6 visitors per posting. The median, 302.8 views and 211.3 visitors. I have no explanation for this phenomenon.

I have a hypothesis. There were 32 likes given in the month, below the mean of 39.3 and median of 35. But several of the posts were pointers to other essays and those are naturally less well-liked. That came to 4.0 likes per posting, below the mean of 4.9 likes per posting and median of 4.5 likes per posting. Comments were anemic again, with only four given in the month. The mean is an impossible-seeming 11.8 and median 10. Per posting, there were 0.5 comments here in March, compared to a mean of 1.4 and median of 1.2. So it goes.

What was popular in March? Pi Day comic strips, of course, and my making something out of the NCAA March Madness basketball tournament. Here’s the March postings in descending order of popularity.

Stuff from before this past month was popular too, including several of the individual Pi Day pages. And my post about the most and least likely dates for Easter, which is sure to be a seasonal favorite.

WordPress figures that I posted 6,655 words in March, for an average post length of 1,128. If that number seems familiar it does to me too. I had 1,128 words per posting, on average, in January too, an event that caused me to go check that I hadn’t recorded something wrong. But that was also a month with many more posts (many repeats). This brought my average words per post for the year down to 831.9, close to half what my average was at the end of February.

WordPress figures that I started April 2022 with a total of 1,705 posts here. They’d drawn 3,317 comments, with a total 157,138 views from 94,502 recorded unique visitors.

If you’d like to be a regular reader around here, please read. There’s a button at the upper right of the page, “Follow Nebusresearch”. That adds this blog to your WordPress reader. There’s a field below that to get posts e-mailed as they’re published. I do nothing with the e-mail except send those posts. WordPress probably has some incomprehensible page where they say what the do with your e-mails. And if you have an RSS reader, you can put the essays feed into that.

Thank you all for your reading.

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Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there. He/him.

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