A Picture Showing Why The Square Root of 2 Is Irrational


Seyma Erbas had a post recently that I quite liked. It’s a nearly visual proof of the irrationality of the square root of two. Proving that the square root of two is irrational isn’t by itself a great trick: either that or the proof there are infinitely many prime numbers is probably the simplest interesting proof-by-contradiction someone could do. The Pythagoreans certainly knew of it, and being the Pythagoreans, inspired confusing legends about just what they did about this irrationality.

Anyway, in the reblogged post here, a proof (by contradiction) that the square root of two can’t be rational is done nearly entirely in pictures. The paper which Seyma Erbas cites, Steven J Miller and David Montague’s “Irrationality From The Book”, also includes similar visual proofs of the irrationality of the square roots of three, five, and six, and if the pictures don’t inspire you to higher mathematics they might at least give you ideas for retiling the kitchen. Miller and Montague talk about the generalization problem — making similar diagrams for larger and larger numbers, such as ten — and where their generalization stops working.

Seyma Erbas

Yesterday I came a across a new (new to me, that is) proof of the irrationality of sqrt{2}. I found it in the paper “Irrationality From The Book,” by Steven J. Miller, David Montague, which was recently posted to arXiv.org.

Apparently the proof was discovered by Stanley Tennenbaum in the 1950′s but was made widely known by John Conway around 1990. The proof appeared in Conway’s chapter “The Power of Mathematics” of the book Power, which was edited by Alan F. Blackwell, David MacKay (2005).

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Peer Gibberish


Well, this is an embarrassing thing to see: according to Nature, the Springer publishing and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) have had to withdraw at least 120 papers from their subscription services, because the papers were gibberish produced by a program, SCIgen, that strings together words and phrases into computer science-ish texts. SCIgen and this sort of thing are meant for fun (Nature also linked to arXiv vs snarXiv, which lets you try to figure out whether titles are actual preprints on the arXiv server or gibberish), but such nonsense papers have been accepted for conferences or published in, typically, poorly-reviewed forums, to general amusement and embarrassment when it’s noticed.

I’m sympathetic to the people who were supposed to review these papers. It’s hard reading any kind of academic paper, for one. They tend to be written with the goal of presenting novel findings efficiently; whether they’re pleasant to read isn’t a factor. (I wouldn’t be surprised if authors had no idea how to write so as to be enjoyable to read, either. I didn’t get any training in writing-to-be-read and I don’t remember seeing courses in that.) It’s also very hard to read something outside your specialty: the terminology and vocabulary and writing styles can be ferociously localized. Just today I was reading a WordPress post which started from the equations Euler used to describe the flow of viscosity-free fluids, which was at the heart of my thesis, and before eight paragraphs it had got into symbols I barely recognized and into points I’ll need to re-read and re-think before I can grasp them. And reviewing papers is really unappreciated; the best you can really hope for is to dig deep into the paper and understand it so thoroughly you can write a better version of it than the authors did, and so be thanked for making perceptive criticisms when the revised version of the paper comes out. The system makes it too easy to conclude something like “well, I don’t really have the time to understand all of this, but I on skimming it I don’t see anything plainly offensive to all persons, so, it probably makes sense to people who are looking for this kind of paper” and go on to a more pressing deadline, and I admit I don’t have a better system in mind.

I’m also reminded of a bit of folklore from my grad school days, in a class on dynamical systems. That’s the study of physics-type problems, with the attention being not so much on actually saying what something will do from this starting point — for example, if you push this swing this hard, how long will it take to stop swinging — and more on what the different kinds of behavior are — can you make the swing just rock around a little bit, or loop around once and then rock to a stop, or loop around twice, or loop around four hundred times, or so on — and what it takes to change that behavior mode. The instructor referred us to a paper that was an important result but warned us to not bother trying to read it because nobody had ever understood it from the paper. Instead, it was understood — going back to the paper’s introduction — by people having the salient points explained by other people who’d had it taught to them in conversations, all the way back to the first understanders, who got it from the original authors, possibly in talking mathematics over while at the bar. I’m embarrassed to say I don’t remember which paper it was (it was a while ago and there are a lot of key results in the field), so I haven’t even been able to figure how to search for the paper or the lore around it.