Some More Mathematics Stuff To Read


And some more reasy reading, because, why not? First up is a new Twitter account from Chris Lusto (Lustomatical), a high school teacher with interest in Mathematical Twitter. He’s constructed the Math-Twitter-Blog-o-Sphere Bot, which retweets postings of mathematics blogs. They’re drawn from his blogroll, and a set of posts comes up a couple of times per day. (I believe he’s running the bot manually, in case it starts malfunctioning, for now.) It could be a useful way to find something interesting to read, or if you’ve got your own mathematics blog, a way to let other folks know you want to be found interesting.

Also possibly of interest is Gregory Taylor’s Any ~Qs comic strip blog. Taylor is a high school teacher and an amateur cartoonist. He’s chosen the difficult task of drawing a comic about “math equations as people”. It’s always hard to do a narrowly focused web comic. You can see Taylor working out the challenges of writing and drawing so that both story and teaching purposes are clear. I would imagine, for example, people to giggle at least at “tangent pants” even if they’re not sure what a domain restriction would have to do with anything, or even necessarily mean. But it is neat to see someone trying to go beyond anthropomorphized numerals in a web comic. And, after all, Math With Bad Drawings has got the hang of it.

Finally, an article published in Notices of the American Mathematical Society, and which I found by some reference now lost to me. The essay, “Knots in the Nursery:(Cats) Cradle Song of James Clerk Maxwell”, is by Professor Daniel S Silver. It’s about the origins of knot theory, and particularly of a poem composed by James Clerk Maxwell. Knot theory was pioneered in the late 19th century by Peter Guthrie Tait. Maxwell is the fellow behind Maxwell’s Equations, the description of how electricity and magnetism propagate and affect one another. Maxwell’s also renowned in statistical mechanics circles for explaining, among other things, how the rings of Saturn could work. And it turns out he could write nice bits of doggerel, with references Silver usefully decodes. It’s worth reading for the mathematical-history content.

WordPress’s 2014 in review, Mathematics Blog Edition


It’s a little more formal than my usual monthly roundups, but WordPress makes this nice little animated report and everything for the year as a whole, and I’d like to share it now while I work on the first mathematics-comics roundup for 2015.

A static scene of fireworks to tease people into the whole (visual) report.

Here's an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 7,000 times in 2014. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 6 trips to carry that many people.

Here’s the complete report.

No Conjecture For 19,000


I failed to notice when it happened but my little blog here reached its 19,000th page view sometime on Saturday the 22nd. I’m sorry to have missed it; I like keeping track of these little milestones and I expect to be pretty self-confident if and when I hit 20,000. I know these aren’t enormous numbers, as even mathematics blogging goes, but I do feel like I’m getting a larger audience, that’s sometimes also more engaged, and that’s gratifying.

Since I don’t want to just seem to be bragging about a really minor accomplishment I hoped to include a conjecture that would be a nice little puzzle, following up on the right-triangle stuff done so recently here. But in writing out the problem exactly, I realized that the conjecture I had in mind was (a) false, and (b) really obviously false. Which is a shame, but so many attempts at figuring out something turn out that way. I’m deciding whether to swallow my pride and lay out the line of thought that ended up in disappointment, on the grounds that you never get to see a mathematician go through the stages of discovery only to come up with a flop; that’s not the sort of thing that gets into papers, much less textbooks, unless there’s a good juicy scandal behind it. We’ll see.

My Math Blog Statistics, August 2014


So, August 2014: it’s been a month that brought some interesting threads into my writing here. It’s also had slightly longer gaps in my writing than I quite like, because I’d just not had the time to do as much writing as I hoped. But that leaves the question of how this affected my readership: are people still sticking around and do they like what they see?

The number of unique readers around here, according to WordPress, rose slightly, from 231 in July to 255 in August. This doesn’t compare favorably to numbers like the 315 visitors in May, but still, it’s an increase. The total number of page views dropped from 589 in July to 561 in August and don’t think that the last few days of the month I wasn’t tempted to hit refresh a bunch of times. Anyway, views per visitor dropped from 2.55 to 2.20, which seems to be closer to my long-term average. And at some point in the month — I failed to track when — I reached my 17,000th reader, and got up to 17,323 by the end of the month. If I’m really interesting this month I could hit 18,000 by the end of September.

The countries sending me the most readers were, in first place, the ever-unsurprising United States (345). Second place was Spain (36) which did take me by surprise, and Puerto Rico was third (30). The United Kingdom, Austria, and Canada came up next so at least that’s all familiar enough, and India sent me a nice round dozen readers. I got a single reader from each of Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Finland, Germany, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Latvia, Mexico, Romania, Serbia, South Korea, Sweden, Thailand, and Venezuela. The only country that also sent me a single reader in July was Hong Kong (which also sent a lone reader in June and in May), and going back over last month’s post revealed that Spain and Puerto Rico were single-reader countries in July. I don’t know what I did to become more interesting there in August but I’ll try to keep it going.

The most popular articles in August were:

I fear I lack any good Search Term Poetry this month. Actually the biggest search terms have been pretty rote ones, eg:

  • trapezoid
  • barney and clyde carl friedrich comic
  • moment of inertia of cube around the longest diagonal
  • where do negative numbers come from
  • comic strip math cube of binomials

Actually, Gauss comic strips were searched for a lot. I’m sorry I don’t have more of them for folks, but have you ever tried to draw Gauss? I thought not. At least I had something relevant for the moment of inertia question even if I didn’t answer it completely.

July 2014 in Mathematics Blogging


We’ve finally reached the kalends of August so I can look back at the mathematics blog statistics for June and see how they changed in July. Mostly it’s a chance to name countries that had anybody come read entries here, which is strangely popular. I don’t know why.

Since I’d had 16,174 page views total at the start of July I figured I wasn’t going to cross the symbolically totally important 17,000 by the start of August and what do you know but I was right, I didn’t. I did have a satisfying 589 page views (for a total of 16,763), which doesn’t quite reach May’s heights but is a step up from June’s 492 views. The number of unique visitors as WordPress figures it was 231, up from June’s 194. That’s not an unusually large or small number of unique visitors for this year, and it keeps the views per visitor just about unchanged, 2.55 as opposed to June’s 2.54.

July’s most popular postings were mostly mathematics comics ones — well, they have the most reader-friendly hook after all, and often include a comic or two — but I’m gratified by what proved to be the month’s most popular since I like it too:

  1. To Build A Universe, and my simple toy version of an arbitrarily old universe. This builds on In A Really Old Universe and on What’s Going On In The Old Universe, and is followed by Lewis Carroll And My Playing With Universes, also some popular posts.
  2. Reading the Comics, July 3, 2014: Wulff and Morgenthaler Edition, I suppose because WuMo is a really popular comic strip these days.
  3. Reading the Comics, July 28, 2014: Homework in an Amusement Park Edition, I suppose because everybody likes amusement parks these days.
  4. Reading the Comics, July 24, 2014: Math Is Just Hard Stuff, Right? Edition, I suppose because people like thinking mathematics is hard these days.
  5. Some Things About Joseph Nebus, because I guess I had a sudden onset of being interesting?
  6. Reading the Comics, July 18, 2014: Summer Doldrums Edition, because summer gets to us all these days.

The countries sending me the most readers this month were the United States (369 views), the United Kingdom (43 views), and the Philippines (24 views). Australia, Austria, Canada, and Singapore turned up well too. Sending just a single viewer this month were Greece, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Norway, Puerto Rico, and Spain; Hong Kong and Japan were the only ones who did that in June, and for that matter May also. My Switzerland reader from June had a friend this past month.

Among the search terms that brought people to me this month:

  • comics strips for differential calculus
  • nebus on starwars
  • 82 % what do i need on my finalti get a c
  • what 2 monsters on monster legends make dark nebus

  • (this seems like an ominous search query somehow)
  • the 80s cartoon character who sees mathematics equations
  • starwars nebus
    (suddenly this Star Wars/Me connection seems ominous)
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe
    (I can’t argue with that)

My June 2013 Statistics


I don’t understand why, but an awful lot of the advice I see about blogging says that it’s important not just to keep track of how your blog is doing, but also to share it, so that … numbers will like you more? I don’t know. But I can give it a try, anyway.

For June 2013, according to WordPress, I had some 713 page views, out of 246 unique visitors. That’s the second-highest number of page views I’ve had in any month this year (January had 831 views), and the third-highest I’ve had for all time (there were 790 in March 2012). The number of unique visitors isn’t so impressive; since WordPress started giving me that information in December 2012, I’ve had more unique visitors … actually, in every month but May 2013. On the other hand, the pages-per-viewer count of 2.90 is the best I’ve had; the implication seems to be that I’m engaging my audience.

The most popular posts for the past month were Counting From 52 to 11,108, which I believe reflects it getting picked for a class assignment somehow; A Cedar Point Follow-Up, which hasn’t got much mathematics in it but has got pretty pictures of an amusement park, and Solving The Price Is Right’s “Any Number” Game, which has got some original mathematics but also a pretty picture.

My all-time most popular posts are from the series about Trapezoids — working out how to find their area, and how many kinds of trapezoids there are — with such catchy titles as How Many Trapezoids I Can Draw, or How Do You Make A Trapezoid Right?, or Setting Out To Trap A Zoid, which should be recognized as a Dave Barry reference.

My most frequent commenters, “recent”, whatever that means, are Chiaroscuro and BunnyHugger (virtually tied), with fluffy, elkelement, MJ Howard, and Geoffrey Brent rounding out the top six.

The most common source of page clicks the past month was from the United States (468), with Brazil (51) and Canada (23) taking silver and bronze. And WordPress recorded one click each from Portugal, Serbia, Hungary, Macedonia (the Former Yugoslav Republic), Indonesia, Argentina, Poland, Slovenia, and Viet Nam. I’ve been to just one of those countries.

I Try Telling Jokes, Too


I’d like to take a moment — after my most popular month ever, according to the WordPress statistics, one in which my little math blog managed to reach not just the 7,777th viewer but also the 8,000th, with the nice round 8,192nd looking like it’s coming soon — to announce the inauguration of another blog of my hopefully creative writing.

This one, Nebushumor.wordpress.com, is for the writing that I at least intend to be funny, and while I concede the number of people who actually share my sense of humor is perhaps not overwhelming, there’s probably some out there who do, and I’d appreciate your looking and following if you like what you see. Right now I’m still in the stage of starting a new project where I feel hideously embarrassed that I put myself forward like that, all set for public humiliation and whatnot, but that feeling will pass. I hope.

Also, I found a setting that lets me turn on little numeric ratings for all my various articles. I’m hoping that people enjoy this because if there’s one thing I’ve learned about the Internet, it’s that people like getting to click stuff. Plus turning it on satisfied my urge to fiddle with the look of this blog a while, since I can’t find another WordPress theme that I like for it.