Reading the Comics, July 6, 2016: Another Busy Week Edition


It’s supposed to be the summer vacation. I don’t know why Comic Strip Master Command is so eager to send me stuff. Maybe my standards are too loose. This doesn’t even cover all of last week’s mathematically-themed comics. I’ll need another that I’ve got set for Tuesday. I don’t mind.

Corey Pandolph and Phil Frank and Joe Troise’s The Elderberries rerun for the 3rd features one of my favorite examples of applied probability. The game show Deal or No Deal offered contestants the prize within a suitcase they picked, or a dealer’s offer. The offer would vary up or down as non-selected suitcases were picked, giving the chance for people to second-guess themselves. It also makes a good redemption game. The banker’s offer would typically be less than the expectation value, what you’d get on average from all the available suitcases. But now and then the dealer offered more than the expectation value and I got all ready to yell at the contestants.

This particular strip focuses on a smaller question: can you pick which of the many suitcases held the grand prize? And with the right setup, yes, you can pick it reliably.

Mac King and Bill King’s Magic in a Minute for the 3rd uses a bit of arithmetic to support a mind-reading magic trick. The instructions say to start with a number from 1 to 10 and do various bits of arithmetic which lead inevitably to 4. You can prove that for an arbitrary number, or you can just try it for all ten numbers. That’s tedious but not hard and it’ll prove the inevitability of 4 here. There aren’t many countries with names that start with ‘D’; Denmark’s surely the one any American (or European) reader is likeliest to name. But Dominica, the Dominican Republic, and Djibouti would also be answers. (List Of Countries Of The World.com also lists Dhekelia, which I never heard of either.) Anyway, with Denmark forced, ‘E’ almost begs for ‘elephant’. I suppose ’emu’ would do too, or ‘echidna’. And ‘elephant’ almost forces ‘grey’ for a color, although ‘white’ would be plausible too. A magician has to know how things like this work.

Werner Wejp-Olsen’s feature Inspector Danger’s Crime Quiz for the 4th features a mathematician as victim of the day’s puzzle murder. I admit I’m skeptical of deathbed identifications of murderers like this, but it would spoil a lot of puzzle mysteries if we disallowed them. (Does anyone know how often a deathbed identification actually happens?) I can’t make the alleged answer make any sense to me. Danger of the trade in murder puzzles.

Kris Straub’s Starship for the 4th uses mathematics as a stand-in for anything that’s hard to study and solve. I’m amused.

Edison Lee tells his grandfather how if the universe is infinitely large, then it's possible there's an exact duplicate to him. This makes his grandfather's head explode. Edison's father says 'I see you've been pondering incomprehensibles again'. Headless grandfather says 'I need a Twinkie.'
John Hambrock’s The Brilliant Mind of Edison lee for the 6th of July, 2016. I’m a little surprised the last panel wasn’t set on a duplicate Earth where things turned out a little differently.

John Hambrock’s The Brilliant Mind of Edison lee for the 6th is about the existentialist dread mathematics can inspire. Suppose there is a chance, within any given volume of space, of Earth being made. Well, it happened at least once, didn’t it? If the universe is vast enough, it seems hard to argue that there wouldn’t be two or three or, really, infinitely many versions of Earth. It’s a chilling thought. But it requires some big suppositions, most importantly that the universe actually is infinite. The observable universe, the one we can ever get a signal from, certainly isn’t. The entire universe including the stuff we can never get to? I don’t know that that’s infinite. I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s impossible to say, for good reason. Anyway, I’m not worried about it.

Jim Meddick’s Monty for the 6th is part of a storyline in which Monty is worshipped by tiny aliens who resemble him. They’re a bit nerdy, and calculate before they understand the relevant units. It’s a common mistake. Understand the problem before you start calculating.

June 2014 In Mathematics Blogging


And with the start of July I look over how well the mathematics blog did in June and see what I can learn from that. It seems more people are willing to read when I post stuff, which is worth knowing, I guess. After May’s near-record of 751 views and 315 visitors I expected a fall, and, yeah, it came. The number of pages viewed dropped to 492, which is … well, the fourth-highest this year at least? And the number of unique visitors fell to 194, which is actually the lowest of this year. The silver lining is this means the views per visitor, 2.54, was the second-highest since WordPress started sharing those statistics with me, so, people who come around find themselves interested. I start the month at 16,174 views total and won’t cross 17,000 at that rate come July, but we’ll see what I can do. And between WordPress and Twitter I’m (as of this writing) at exactly 400 followers, which isn’t worldshaking but is a nice big round number. I admit thinking how cool it would be if that were 400 million but I’d probably get stage fright if it were.

If one thing defined June it was “good grief but there’s a lot of mathematics comics”, which I attributed to Comic Strip Master Command ordering cartoonists to clear the subject out before summer vacation. It does mean the top five posts for June are almost comically lopsided, though:

Now, that really is something neat about triangles in the post linked above so please do read it. What I’m not clear about is why the June 16th comics post was so extremely popular; it’s nearly twice as viewed as the runner-up. If I were sure what keyword is making it so popular I’d do more with that.

Now on to the international portion of this contest: what countries are sending me the most visitors? Of course the United States comes in first, at 336 views. Denmark finished second with 17, and there was a three-way tie for third as Australia, Austria, and the United Kingdom sent sixteen each. (Singapore and Canada came in next with nine each.) I had a pretty nice crop of single-reader countries this month: Argentina, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Egypt, Ghana, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Paraguay, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland, and Thailand. Hong Kong, Japan, and Switzerland are repeats from last month and nobody’s got a three-month streak going.

Among the interesting search terms to bring people to me:

  • names for big numbers octillion [ happy to help? ]
  • everything to need to know about trapezoids [ I’m going to be the world’s authority on trapezoids! ]
  • what does the fact that two trapezoids make a parallelogram say about tth midline [ I have some ideas but don’t want to commit to anything particular ]
  • latching onto you 80 version [ I … think I’m being asked for lyrics? ]
  • planet nebus [ I feel vaguely snarked upon, somehow ]
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe [ … thank you? ]
  • nebus student job for uae [ Um … I guess I can figure out a consulting fee or something if you ask? ]