Reading the Comics, November 27, 2018: Multiplication Edition


Last week Comic Strip Master Command sent out just enough on-theme comics for two essays, the way I do them these days. The first half has some multiplication in two of the strips. So that’s enough to count as a theme for me.

Aaron Neathery’s Endtown for the 26th depicts a dreary, boring school day by using arithmetic. A lot of times tables. There is some credible in-universe reason to be drilling on multiplication like this. The setting is one where the characters can’t expect to have computers available. That granted, I’m not sure there’s a point to going up to memorizing four times 27. Going up to twelve-times seems like enough for common uses. For multiplying two- and longer-digit numbers together we usually break the problem up into a string of single-digit multiplications.

A classroom teacher drills: 4 times 20 is 80. 4 times 21 is 84. 4 times 22 is 88. 4 times 23 is 92. Students struggle to stay awake. One, an anthropomorphic cat, glares at the insect companion of an anthropomorphic bird.
Aaron Neathery’s Endtown for the 26th of November, 2018. Other essays mentioning topics brought up by Endtown should go here. If there ever are any. This is a new tag, and the strip’s setting — adventures in a post-apocalyptic world that’s left what remains of humanity turned into anthropomorphized animals and clinging to subterranean shelters against the global wasteland — makes it kind of a hard one to fit in any good jokes about algebra.

There are a handful of bigger multiplications that can make your life easier to know, like how four times 25 is 100. Or three times 33 is pretty near 100. But otherwise? … Of course, the story needs the class to do something dull and seemingly pointless. Going deep into multiplication tables communicates that to the reader quickly.

Ernest: 'You say more people are watching your online arithmetic classes?' Frank: 'No, I said the audience is multiplying.'
Thaves’s Frank and Ernest for the 26th of November, 2018. Other appearances by Frank and/or Ernest should be at this link. This strip’s premise makes it rather easier to toss in a couple jokes about algebra.

Thaves’s Frank and Ernest for the 26th is a spot of wordplay. Also a shout-out to my friends who record mathematics videos for YouTube. It is built on the conflation between the ideas of something multiplying and the amount of something growing. It’s easy to see where the idea comes from; just keep hitting ‘x 2’ on a calculator and the numbers grow excitingly fast. You get even more exciting results with ‘x 3’ or ‘x π’. But multiplying by 1 is still multiplication. As is multiplying by a number smaller than 1. Including negative numbers. That doesn’t hurt the joke any. That multiplying two things together doesn’t necessarily give you something larger is a consideration when you’re thinking rigorously about what multiplication can do. It doesn’t have to be part of normal speech.

Edison, to his friend: 'Math problem: if my mom bakes 24 cookies, and I eat twenty ...' (He scarfs them down) ' ... how many cookies does she have left?' Mom: 'HEY!' Later, Edison, to Dad: 'Being a teacher is a thankless job.'
John Hambrock’s The Brilliant Mind of Edison Lee for the 27th of November, 2018. Essays mentioning topics raised by Edison Lee are at this link. The strip’s premise that Edison Lee is some kind of genius always doing weird stuff in science and computers make it fairly likely it’ll turn up.

John Hambrock’s The Brilliant Mind of Edison Lee for the 27th uses the form of a word problem to show off Edison’s gluttony. Edison tries to present it as teaching. We all have rationalizations for giving in to our appetites.

Anthropomorphized numeral 1 sitting at a bar. In the background a 3 is saying to a 5: 'Por fellow. One really is the loneliest number.'
Nate Frakes’s Break of Day for the 27th of November, 2018. And this and other appearances by Break of Day should be at this link. The strip’s premise as a Far Side-esque strange-joke-a-day means it ought to be a common presence here, but somehow it doesn’t appear as much as I’d expect.

Nate Frakes’s Break of Day for the 27th is the anthropomorphic numerals joke for the week. I don’t know that there’s anything in the other numerals being odds rather than evens, or a mixture of odds and evens. It might just be that they needed to be anything but 1.


All of my regular Reading the Comics posts should all be at this link. The next in my Fall 2018 Mathematics A To Z glossary should be posted Tuesday. I’m glad for it if you do come around and read again.

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