Counting Things


I’ve been working on my little thread of posts about sports mathematics. But I’ve also had a rather busy week and I just didn’t have time to finish the next bit of pondering I had regarding baseball scores. Among other things I had the local pinball league’s post-season Split-Flipper Tournament to play in last night. I played lousy, too.

So I hope I may bring your attention to some interesting posts from Baking And Math. Yenergy started, last week, with a post about the Gauss Circle Problem. Carl Friedrich Gauss you may know as the mathematical genius who proved the Fundamental Theorem of Whatever Subfield Of Mathematics You’re Talking About. Circles are those same old things. The problem is quite old, and easy to understand, and not answered yet. Start with a grid of regularly spaced dots. Draw a circle centered on one of the dots. How many dots are inside the circle?

Obviously you can count. What we would like is a formula, though: if this is the radius then that function of the radius is the number of points. We don’t have that, remarkably. Yenergy describes some of that, and some ways to estimate the number of points. This is for the circle and for some other shapes.

Yesterday, Yenergy continued the discussion and got into partitions. Partitions sound boring; they’re about identifying ways to split something up into components. Yet they turn up everywhere. I’m most used to them in statistical mechanics, the study of physics problems where there’s too many things moving to keep track of them all. But it isn’t surprising they turn up in this sort of point-counting problem.

As a bonus Yenergy links to an article examining a famous story about Gauss. This is specifically the famous story about him, as a child, doing a quite long arithmetic problem at a glance. It’s a story that’s passed into legend and I had not known how much of it was legend.

My Math Blog Statistics, August 2014


So, August 2014: it’s been a month that brought some interesting threads into my writing here. It’s also had slightly longer gaps in my writing than I quite like, because I’d just not had the time to do as much writing as I hoped. But that leaves the question of how this affected my readership: are people still sticking around and do they like what they see?

The number of unique readers around here, according to WordPress, rose slightly, from 231 in July to 255 in August. This doesn’t compare favorably to numbers like the 315 visitors in May, but still, it’s an increase. The total number of page views dropped from 589 in July to 561 in August and don’t think that the last few days of the month I wasn’t tempted to hit refresh a bunch of times. Anyway, views per visitor dropped from 2.55 to 2.20, which seems to be closer to my long-term average. And at some point in the month — I failed to track when — I reached my 17,000th reader, and got up to 17,323 by the end of the month. If I’m really interesting this month I could hit 18,000 by the end of September.

The countries sending me the most readers were, in first place, the ever-unsurprising United States (345). Second place was Spain (36) which did take me by surprise, and Puerto Rico was third (30). The United Kingdom, Austria, and Canada came up next so at least that’s all familiar enough, and India sent me a nice round dozen readers. I got a single reader from each of Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Finland, Germany, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Latvia, Mexico, Romania, Serbia, South Korea, Sweden, Thailand, and Venezuela. The only country that also sent me a single reader in July was Hong Kong (which also sent a lone reader in June and in May), and going back over last month’s post revealed that Spain and Puerto Rico were single-reader countries in July. I don’t know what I did to become more interesting there in August but I’ll try to keep it going.

The most popular articles in August were:

I fear I lack any good Search Term Poetry this month. Actually the biggest search terms have been pretty rote ones, eg:

  • trapezoid
  • barney and clyde carl friedrich comic
  • moment of inertia of cube around the longest diagonal
  • where do negative numbers come from
  • comic strip math cube of binomials

Actually, Gauss comic strips were searched for a lot. I’m sorry I don’t have more of them for folks, but have you ever tried to draw Gauss? I thought not. At least I had something relevant for the moment of inertia question even if I didn’t answer it completely.