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  • Joseph Nebus 4:00 pm on Monday, 7 August, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Herb and Jamaal, jokes, , Ozy and Millie, , ,   

    Reading the Comics, August 5, 2017: Lazy Summer Week Edition 


    It wasn’t like the week wasn’t busy. Comic Strip Master Command sent out as many mathematically-themed comics as I might be able to use. But they were again ones that don’t leave me much to talk about. I’ll try anyway. It was looking like an anthropomorphic-symboles sort of week, too.

    Tom Thaves’s Frank and Ernest for the 30th of July is an anthropomorphic-symbols joke. The tick marks used for counting make an appearance and isn’t that enough? Maybe.

    Dan Thompson’s Brevity for the 31st is another entry in the anthropomorphic-symbols joke contest. This one sticks to mathematical symbols, so if the Frank and Ernest makes the cut this week so must this one.

    Eric the Circle for the 31st, this installment by “T daug”, gives the slightly anthropomorphic geometric figure a joke that at least mentions a radius, and isn’t that enough? What catches my imagination about this panel particularly is that the “fractured radius” is not just a legitimate pun but also resembles a legitimate geometry drawing. Drawing a diameter line is sensible enough. Drawing some other point on the circle and connecting that to the ends of the diameter is also something we might do.

    Scott Hilburn’s The Argyle Sweater for the 1st of August is one of the logical mathematics jokes you could make about snakes. The more canonical one runs like this: God in the Garden of Eden makes all the animals and bids them to be fruitful. And God inspects them all and finds rabbits and doves and oxen and fish and fowl all growing in number. All but a pair of snakes. God asks why they haven’t bred and they say they can’t, not without help. What help? They need some thick tree branches chopped down. The bemused God grants them this. God checks back in some time later and finds an abundance of baby snakes in the Garden. But why the delay? “We’re adders,” explain the snakes, “so we need logs to multiply”. This joke absolutely killed them in the mathematics library up to about 1978. I’m told.

    John Deering’s Strange Brew for the 1st is a monkeys-at-typewriters joke. It faintly reminds me that I might have pledged to retire mentions of the monkeys-at-typewriters joke. But I don’t remember so I’ll just have to depend on saying I don’t think I retired the monkeys-at-typewriters jokes and trust that someone will tell me if I’m wrong.

    Dana Simpson’s Ozy and Millie rerun for the 2nd name-drops multiplication tables as the sort of thing a nerd child wants to know. They may have fit the available word balloon space better than “know how to diagram sentences” would.

    Mark Anderson’s Andertoons for the 3rd is the reassuringly normal appearance of Andertoons for this week. It is a geometry class joke about rays, line segments with one point where there’s an end and … a direction where it just doesn’t. And it riffs on the notion of the existence of mathematical things. At least I can see it that way.

    Dad: 'How many library books have you read this summer, Hammie?' Hammie: 'About 47.' Zoe: 'HA!' Dad: 'Hammie ... ' Hammie: 'Okay ... two.' Dad: 'Then why did you say 47?' Hammie: 'I was rounding up.' Zoe: 'NOW he understands math!'

    Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott’s Baby Blues for the 5th of August, 2017. Hammie totally blew it by saying “about forty-seven”. Too specific a number to be a plausible lie. “About forty” or “About fifty”, something you can see as the result of rounding off, yes. He needs to know there are rules about how to cheat.

    Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott’s Baby Blues for the 5th is a rounding-up joke that isn’t about herds of 198 cattle.

    Stephen Bentley’s Herb and Jamaal for the 5th tosses off a mention of the New Math as something well out of fashion. There are fashions in mathematics, as in all human endeavors. It startles many to learn this.

     
  • Joseph Nebus 3:00 pm on Thursday, 24 March, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , jokes, ,   

    Reading the Comics, March 21, 2016: New Math And The NCAA Edition 


    Terri Libenson’s The Pajama Diaries for the 20th of March mentions, among “reasons for ice cream”, the stress of having “helped with New Math”. It’s a curious reference, to me. I expect it refers to the stress of how they teach arithmetic differently from how it was when you grew up. I expect that feeds any adult’s natural anxiety about having forgot, or never really been good at, arithmetic. Add to that the anxiety of not being able to help your child when you’re called on. And add to that the ever-present fear of looking like a fool. There’s plenty of reason to be anxious.

    Among Mom's Reasons For Ice Cream: 'Helped with New Math'.

    Terri Libenson’s The Pajama Diaries for the 20th of March, 2016.

    Still, the reference to “New Math” is curious since, at least in the United States, that refers to a specific era. In the 1960s and 70s mathematics education saw a major revision, called the “New Math”. This revision tried many different approaches, but built around the theory that students should know why mathematics looks like it does. The hope was that in this way students wouldn’t just know what eight times seven was, but would agree that it made sense for this to be 56. The movement is, generally, regarded as a well-meant failure. The reasons are diverse, but many of them amount to it being very hard to explain why mathematics looks like it does. And it’s even harder to explain it to parents, who haven’t gone to school for years and aren’t going to go back to learn eight times seven. And it’s hard for many teachers, who often aren’t specialists in mathematics, to learn eight times seven in a new way either.

    Still, the New Math was dead and buried in the United States by the 1980s. And more, Libenson is Canadian. I don’t know what educational fashions, and reform fashions, are like in Canada. I’m curious if Canadian parents or teachers could let me know, what is going on in reforming Canadian mathematics education? Is “New Math” a term of art in Canada now? Or did Libenson pick a term that would communicate efficiently “mathematics but not like I learned it”?

    Rudolph Dirk’s The Katzenjammer Kids on the 20th reprinted the strip from the 5th of September, 1943. I mention it here because it contains an example of mathematics talk being used as signifier of great intelligence. The kids expound: “Now, der t’eory uf der twerpsicosis iss dot er sum uf circumvegetatium und der horizontal triggernometry iss equal to der … ” and that’s as far as it needs to go. It isn’t quite mathematics, but it is certainly using a painting of mathematics to make one look bright.

    'Now der t'eory uf der twerpipsicosis iss dot der sum uf circumvegetatium und der horizontal triggernomery iss equal to der --- ' 'My, how smart you iss to know such big voids!'

    Rudolph Dirk’s The Katzenjammer Kids for the 5th of September, 1943, and rerun the 20th of March, 2016. I know it’s a lot of text to read; I’m sorry.

    Mark Anderson’s Andertoons got its appearance in here the 20th. It’s got a student resisting the equivalent fractions idea. he kid notes that 1/2 might equal 2/4 and 4/8 and 8/16, but “the ones on the right feel like more bang for your buck”. The kid has a point. These are all the same number. It’s usually easiest to work with the smallest representation that means what you need. But they might convey their meanings differently. I get a different picture, at least, in speaking of “half the class not being done with the assignment” versus “16 of the 32 students aren’t done with the assignment”.

    Charlie Podrebarac’s CowTown for the 20th of March claims Charlie could “literally paper the Earth” with losing NCAA brackets. As I make it out, he’s right. There are 263 possible NCAA brackets, because there are 63 matches in the college basketball tournament. All but one of these are losing. If each bracket fits on one sheet of paper — well, how big is a sheet of paper? If each bracket is on a sheet of A4-size paper, then, each page is 1/16th of a square meter. This is easy to work with. Unfortunately, if Charlie cares about the NCAA college basketball tournament, he’s probably in the United States. So he would print out on paper that’s 8 ½ inches by 11 inches. That’s not quite 1/16th of a square meter or any other convenient-to-work-with size. It’s 93.5 square inches but what good is that?

    Well, I will pretend that the 8 ½ by 11 inch paper is close enough to A4. It’s going to turn out not to matter. 263 is 9,223,372,036,854,775,808. Subtract one and we have 9,223,372,036,854,775,807. Big difference. Multiply this by one-sixteenth of a square meter and we have about 576,460,752,000,000,000 square meters of paper. I’m rounding off because it is beyond ridiculous that I didn’t before. The surface area of the Earth is about 510,000,000,000,000 square meters. So if Bob picked every possible losing bracket he could indeed literally paper the Earth a thousand times over and have some paper to spare.

    T Shepherd’s gentle and sweet Snow Sez for the 21st of March is a bit of humor about addition and the limits of what it can tell us.

    Ruben Bolling’s Super-Fun-Pak Comix for the 21st of March is a Guy Walks Into A Bar that depends on non-base-ten arithmetic for its punch line. I’m amused. I learned about different bases as a kid, in the warm glow of the New Math. The different bases and how they changed what arithmetic looked like enchanted me. Today I know there’s not much need for bases besides ten (normal mathematics), two (used by computers), and sixteen (used by people dealing with computers). (Base sixteen converts easily to base two, so people can understand what the computer is actually doing, while being much more compact, so people don’t have to write out prodigiously long sequences of digits.) But for a while there you can play around with base five or base twelve or, as a horse might, base four. It can help you better appreciate how much thought there is behind something as straightforward as “10”.

     
  • Joseph Nebus 3:50 pm on Friday, 1 May, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , jokes, Origin, , , ,   

    How April 2015 Treated My Mathematics Blog 


    (I apologize if the formatting is messed up. For some reason preview is not working, and I will not be trying the new page for entering posts if I can at all help it. I will fix when I can, if it needs fixing.)

    As it’s the start of the month I want to try understanding the readership of my blogs, as WordPress gives me statistics. It’s been a more confusing month than usual, though. One thing is easy to say: the number of pages read was 1,047, an all-time high around these parts for a single month. It’s up from 1,022 in March, and 859 in February. And it’s the second month in a row there’ve been more than a thousand readers. That part’s easy.

    The number of visitors has dropped. It was down to 389 in April, from a record 468 in March and still-higher 407 in April. This is, if WordPress doesn’t lead me awry, my fifth-highest number of viewers. This does mean the number of views per visitor was my highest since June of 2013. The blog had 2.69 views per visitor, compared to 2.18 in March and 2.11 in February. It’s one of my highest views-per-visitor on record anyway. Perhaps people quite like what they see and are archive-binging. I approve of this. I’m curious why the number of readers dropped so, though, particularly when I look at my humor blog statistics (to be posted later).

    I’m confident the readers are there, though. The number of likes on my mathematics blog was 297, up from March’s 265 and February’s 179. It’s the highest on record far as WordPress will tell me. So readers are more engaged, or else they’re clicking like from the WordPress Reader or an RSS feed. Neither gets counted as a page view or a visitor. That’s another easy part. The number of comments is down to 64, from March’s record 93, but March seems to have been an exceptional month. February had 56 comments so I’m not particularly baffled by April’s drop.

    May starts out with 23,884 total views, and 472 people following specifically through WordPress.

    It’s a truism that my most popular posts are the trapezoids one and the Reading The Comics posts, but for April that was incredibly true. Most popular the past thirty days were:

    1. How Many Trapezoids I Can Draw.
    2. Reading The Comics, April 10, 2015: Getting Into The Story Problem Edition.
    3. Reading The Comics, April 15, 2015: Tax Day Edition.
    4. Reading The Comics, April 20, 2015: History Of Mathematics Edition.
    5. Reading The Comics, March 31, 2015: Closing Out March Edition.

    I am relieved that I started giving all these Comics posts their own individual “Edition” titles. Otherwise there’d be no way to tell them apart.

    The nations sending me the most readers were, as ever, the United States (662), Canada (82), and the United Kingdom (47), with Slovenia once again strikingly high (36). Hong Kong came in with 24 readers, Italy 23, and Austria a mere 18. Elke Stangl’s had a busy month, I know.

    This month’s single-reader countries were Czech Republic, Morocco, the Netherlands, Puerto Rico, Romania, Taiwan, and Vietnam. Romania’s the only one that sent me a single reader last month. India bounced back from five readers to six.

    Among the search terms bringing people to me were no poems. Among the interesting phrases were:

    • what point is driving the area difference between two triangles (A good question!)
    • how do you say 1,898,600,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (I almost never do.)
    • is julie larson still drawing the dinette set (Yes, to the best of my knowledge.)
    • jpe fast is earth spinning? (About once per day, although the answer can be surprisingly difficult to say! But also figure about 465 times the cosine of your latitude meters per second, roughly.)
    • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe. (Again, I don’t know what this means, and I’m a little scared to find out.)
    • i hate maths 2015 photos (Well, that just hurts.)
    • getting old teacher jokes (Again, that hurts, even if it’s not near my birthday.)
    • two trapezoids make a (This could be a poem, actually.)
    • how to draw 2 trapezoids (I’d never thought about that one. Shall have to consider writing it.)

    I don’t know quite what it all means, other than that I need to write about comic strips and trapezoids more somehow.

     
    • scifihammy 4:34 pm on Friday, 1 May, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      While I think it is great fun looking at all the stats – and who doesn’t? – I still think the main point is to enjoy blogging. If you enjoy it, chances are your readers will :)
      As for trying to make sense if the numbers, if you ever do – let me know!! :)

      Like

      • Joseph Nebus 6:08 am on Tuesday, 5 May, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Oh, certainly, the important thing is enjoying the blogging. And mostly I do enjoy the writing. Sometimes I end up afraid of the comments, but I try to overcome that.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Angie Mc 7:15 pm on Friday, 1 May, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      OK, Joseph, I’m inching ever closer to doing something with my stats! I’m at least looking at them now :D One thing I like about them is the personal challenge of trying to work hard to engage with others. Looking at the bar graph go up and down helps to keep me motivated in its own way. Congrats on your all time high page reads!

      Like

      • Joseph Nebus 6:09 am on Tuesday, 5 May, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        I love looking at the statistics that say how much more a particular essay is read one week compared to the week before. I’m not so fond of the statistics that say how much less a particular essay is read one week compared to the week before. But I don’t know how to get the first without the second. Yet.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ken Dowell 9:01 pm on Friday, 1 May, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      The WordPress stats are all very fascinating but I sometimes think they raise more questions than they answer.

      Like

      • Joseph Nebus 6:12 am on Tuesday, 5 May, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Oh, do they ever. Mostly “counting trapezoids? That’s all people want of me?” Sometimes I fear I know what a one-hit wonder’s life is like.

        Like

    • elkement 7:31 pm on Saturday, 2 May, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Only 18?? ;-) I would have guessed something more like 30-40? I wonder if one of my AdBlocker thingies on one of my computers prevents WP Stats from collecting my clicks?

      Like

      • Joseph Nebus 6:27 am on Tuesday, 5 May, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Only 18, so it says. But I have wondered if something is blocking reads from showing up in WordPress statistics. I had a weird blip in my humor blog’s readership in April and I’m still not sure what (if anything) accounts for it.

        Liked by 1 person

  • Joseph Nebus 3:15 am on Tuesday, 22 January, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , jokes, , , Wizard of Oz   

    Reading the Comics, January 21, 2013 


    Feast or famine, as I said. It’s not a week since the last comics roundup and I have eight comic strips that have enough mathematical content for me to discuss. Well, they’re fun essays to write, and people seem to quite like them, so why not another so soon?

    Well, because I’m overlooking all the King Features Syndicate comics. I’m not actually overlooking them — I’m keeping track of just which ones have something I could write about — but they haven’t had a nice, archive-friendly way to point people to the strips being discussed. (Most newspaper web sites that have King Features comics have links to those pages expire in a measly 28 days.) Based on the surprising number of people who come to my site by searching for Norm Feuti’s Retail comic strip, they certainly deserve to be talked about. I’ll have something worked out about that soon, I promise.

    (More …)

     
    • Rocket the Pony (@Blue_Pony) 4:29 am on Thursday, 24 January, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      “most people have more than the average — as in arithmetic mean — number of arms”

      I am *so* going to use that knowledge for evil!

      Like

      • Joseph Nebus 5:40 am on Thursday, 24 January, 2013 Permalink | Reply

        It’s free to good homes.

        Mind, most people have the average, as in the median, number of arms. Also the modal average number of arms.

        Anyone wanting to know about the geometric mean deserves what they get.

        Like

  • Joseph Nebus 10:28 pm on Friday, 18 January, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , friendship, , , jokes, society   

    Cutting Commentary 


    It might be that one functional definition of a friend is “someone who can say stuff that would be insulting, but you mostly don’t mind”. I had been chatting with a friend who wasn’t aware of my little blogging effort here, and gave the front page URL. My friend claimed to get a headache “from just a casual perusal!”

    I know what’s intended: an acknowledgement that the writing I’ve been doing has been at least math-flavored, and that’s got almost universal acclaim as something really hard that stresses the mind to think about, and delivered in the form of a joke. It’s an overused joke, to my tastes, but an overused joke can serve several positive purposes. It can be one of the landmarks that one is in an emotionally comfortable place, or mark that the people sharing it share this in common, or that whatever is being joked about has connections to other times the joke’s been used.

    Still, the joke is a bit of a complicated insult too: it insults both the writer, for not being understandable, and the reader, for not understanding. But I know that it’s not meant to insult, and I’m hardly in a position to turn away compliments when I can find them.

    All this muttering I mean, largely, to warn that I am working out whether I’m good enough to write a couple pieces towards a question that really is somewhat head-spinning in a way that someone who isn’t a math or physics major would have a hope of following. I might not be; as I do research I realize I’m hitting questions I can’t fully satisfy myself about. If I can, I may go forward and you’ll see what perusal headaches really look like.

     
  • Joseph Nebus 3:06 am on Thursday, 17 January, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , jokes, ,   

    Reading the Comics, January 16, 2013 


    I was beginning to wonder whether my declaration last time that I’d post a comics review every time I had seven to ten strips to talk about was going to see the extinguishing of math-themed comic strips. It only felt like it. The boom-and-bust cycle continues, though; it took better than two weeks to get six such strips, and then three more came in two days. But that’s the fun of working on relatively rare phenomena. Let me get to the most recent installment of math-themed comics, mostly from Gocomics.com:

    (More …)

     
  • Joseph Nebus 10:47 pm on Thursday, 6 December, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , jokes   

    Reading the Comics, November 21, 2012 


    It’s been long enough since my last roundup of mathematics-themed comics to host a new one. I’m also getting stirred to try tracking how many of these turn up per day, because they certainly feel like they run in a feast-or-famine pattern. There’d be no point to it, besides satisfying my vague feelings that everything can be tracked, but there’s data laying there all ready to be measured, isn’t there?

    (More …)

     
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