How May 2021 Treated My Mathematics Blog


I’ll take this chance now to look over my readership from the past month. It’s either that or actually edit this massive article I’ve had sitting for two months. I keep figuring I’ll edit it this next weekend, and then the week ends before I do. This weekend, though, I’m sure to edit it into coherence. Just you watch.

According to WordPress I had 3,068 page views in May of 2021. That’s an impressive number: my 12-month running mean, leading up to May, was 2,366.0 views per month. The 12-month running median is a similar 2,394 views per month. That startles me, especially as I don’t have any pieces that obviously drew special interest. Sometimes there’s a flood of people to a particular page, or from a particular site. That didn’t happen this month, at least as far as I can tell. There was a steady flow of readers to all kinds of things.

There were 2,085 unique visitors, according to WordPress. That’s down from April, but still well above the running mean of 1,671.9 visitors. And above the median of 1,697 unique visitors.

When we rate things per post the dominance of the past month gets even more amazing. That’s an average 340.9 views per posting this month, compared to a mean of 202.5 or a median of 175.5. (Granted, yes, the majority of those were to things from earlier months; there’s almost ten years of backlog and people notice those too.) And it’s 231.7 unique visitors per posting, versus a mean of 144.7 and a median of 127.4.

Bar chart of two and a half years's worth of monthly readership figures. The last several months have seen a steady roughly 3,000 page views and 2,000 unique visitors a month, an increase over the preceding years.
The most important thing in tracking all this is I hope to someday catch WordPress giving me the same readership statistics two months in a row.

There were 48 likes given in May. That’s below the running mean of 56.3 and median of 55.5. Per-posting, though, these numbers look better. That’s 5.3 likes per posting over the course of May. The mean per posting was 4.5 and the median 4.1 over the previous twelve months. There were 20 comments, barely above the running mean of 19.4 and running median of 18. But that’s 2.2 comments per posting, versus a mean per posting of 1.7 and a median per posting of 1.4. I make my biggest impact with readers by shutting up more.

I got around to publishing nine things in May. A startling number of them were references to other people’s work or, in one case, me talking about using an earlier bit I wrote. Here’s the posts in descending order of popularity. I’m surprised how much this differs from simple chronological order. It suggests there are things people are eager to see, and one of them is Reading the Comics posts. Which I don’t do on a schedule anymore.

As that last and least popular post says, I plan to do an A-to-Z this year. A shorter one than usual, though, one of only fifteen week’s duration, and covering only ten different letters. It’s been a hard year and I need to conserve my energies. I’ll begin appealing for subjects soon.

In May 2021 I posted 4,719 words here, figures WordPress, bringing me to a total of 22,620 words this year. This averages out at 524.3 words per posting in May, and 552 words per post for the year.

As of the start of June I’ve had 1,623 posts to here, which gathered a total 135,779 views from a logged 79,646 unique visitors.

I’d be glad to have you as a regular reader. To be one that never appears in my statistics you can use the RSS feed for my essays. If you don’t have an RSS reader you can sign up for a free account at Dreamwidth or Livejournal. You can add any RSS feed by https://www.dreamwidth.org/feeds/ or https://www.livejournal.com/syn and have it appear on your Friends page.

If you have a WordPress account, you can add my posts to your Reader. Use the “Follow NebusResearch” button to do that. Or you can use “Follow NebusResearch by E-mail” to get posts sent to your mailbox. That’s the way to get essays before I notice their most humiliating typos.

I’m @nebusj on Twitter, but don’t read or interact with it. It posts announcements of essays is all. I do read @nebusj@mathstodon.xyz, on the mathematics-themed Mastodon instance.

Thank you for reading, however it is you’re doing, and I hope you’ll do more of that. If you’re not reading, I suppose I don’t have anything more to say.

How May 2020 Treated My Mathematics Blog


I don’t know why my regular review of my past month’s readership keeps creeping later and later in the month. I understand why it does so on my humor blog: there’s stuff that basically squats on the Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday slots. And a thing has to be written after the 1st of the month. So it can get squeezed along. But my mathematics blog has always been more free-form. I think the trouble is that this is always, in principle, an easy post to write, so it’s always easy enough to push off a little longer, and let harder stuff take my attention. It’s always a mystery how my compulsive need to put things in order will clash with my desire to procrastinate my way out of life.

Still, to May. It was another heck of a month for us all. In it, I published only 13 posts, after a couple of 15-post months in a row. Since the frequency of posting is the one variable I am sure is within my control that affects my readership, how did getting a little more laconic affect my readership?

Bar chart of monthly readership for two years, five months, of work. The last three months have been fairly uniform at about two thousand readers each. October 2019 was abnormally high, around 8500 readers.
You have no idea how upset I am that I didn’t aimlessly hit ‘reload’ just eleven more times in May.

It’s hard to tell, thanks to the October 2019 spike. But my readership crept up a little. There were 1,989 pages viewed in May. This is below the 12-month running average of 2,205.3, but the twelve-month average still includes that October with 8,667 views. There were 1,407 unique visitors, below but still close to the running average of 1,494.0 unique visitors. There were only 35 likes given, below the average of 60.8. But there were 18 comments, above the running average of 14.9. Of course, the twelve-month running average includes December 2019 when nobody left any comments here.

Taking the averages per posting gives me figures that look a little more popular. 153.0 visitors per posting, above the twelve-month running average of 124.6. 108.2 unique visitors per posting, above the average 83.8. Only 2.7 likes per posting, below the 3.7 average. But 1.4 comments per posting, above the 1.0 average.

Where did all these page views come from? Here’s the roster.

Country Readers
United States 1,140
India 128
United Kingdom 109
Canada 96
Australia 45
Philippines 41
Singapore 41
China 22
Turkey 22
Germany 21
Italy 17
Netherlands 17
Austria 14
United Arab Emirates 14
Brazil 13
Sweden 13
Finland 11
Denmark 10
France 10
Japan 10
Malaysia 10
Israel 9
Croatia 8
New Zealand 8
South Africa 8
Colombia 7
El Salvador 6
Hong Kong SAR China 6
Hungary 6
Indonesia 6
Norway 6
Poland 6
Taiwan 6
Egypt 5
Greece 5
Pakistan 5
Romania 5
Belgium 4
Qatar 4
Russia 4
Slovakia 4
Spain 4
Albania 3
Chile 3
Jamaica 3
Jordan 3
Mexico 3
Portugal 3
Serbia 3
Switzerland 3
Thailand 3
Ukraine 3
Argentina 2
Cayman Islands 2
Czech Republic 2
Laos 2
Myanmar (Burma) 2
Palestinian Territories 2
South Korea 2
Vietnam 2
Bahrain 1 (*)
Bangladesh 1
Brunei 1
Bulgaria 1
Cyprus 1
Georgia 1
Guyana 1
Honduras 1
Iraq 1
Ireland 1
Kazakhstan 1
Luxembourg 1
Mauritius 1
Nepal 1
Peru 1
Puerto Rico 1
Zimbabwe 1

This is 77 countries or country-like things all told. There’d been 73 in April and 78 in March. 17 of these were single-view countries. There were 12 of those in April and 30 in March. Only Bahrain has been a single-view country for two months in a row, now.

Mercator-style map of the world with the United States in darkest pink. Most of the Americas, Europe, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand are in a fairly uniform light pink. Almost nothing in Africa is pink; nor are the Baltic states, the Arabian peninsula, Iran, or the adjacent former Soviet republics.
Someday I’ll have a reader in Greenland and I won’t know what to say to them.

All these people looked at, including the home page, 278 posts here. That’s comparable to the 265 of April and 255 of March. 153 pages got more than one view, comparable to the 134 of April and 145 of March. 33 got at least ten views, which is right in line with April’s 36 and March’s 35. The most views were given to some of the usual suspects:

The most popular thing posted in May? That was a tie, actually. One piece was Reading the Comics, May 9, 2020: Knowing the Angles Edition, the usual sort of thing. The other was Reading the Comics, May 2, 2020: What Is The Cosine Of Six Edition, a piece I had meant to follow up on. This is because it so happens that the cosine of six is a number we can, in principle, write out exactly. I had meant to write a post that went through the geometric reasoning that gets you there, but I kept not making time. But, for the short answer, here’s the cosine of six degrees.

First, this will be much easier if we (alas) use the Golden Ratio, φ. That’s a famous number and just about 1.61803. The cosine of six degrees is, to be exact,

\cos(36^\circ) = \left(\frac{1}{2} \cdot \phi\right)\cdot\left(\frac{1}{2}  \sqrt{3}\right) + \sqrt{1 - \frac{1}{4} \phi^2} \cdot \left(\frac{1}{2} \right)

… which you recognize right away reduces to …

\cos(36^\circ) = \frac{1}{4}\sqrt{3} \phi + \frac{1}{4}\sqrt{3 - \phi}

This is a number pretty close to 0.99452, and you can get as many decimal digits as you like. You just have to go through working out decimal digits, ultimately, of \sqrt{5} . I include the first line because if you look closely at it, you’ll get a hint of how to find the cosine of six degrees. It’s the parts of an angle-subtraction formula for cosine.


WordPress estimates me as having published 7,442 words in May. That’s an average of a slender 496.13 words per posting. My average post for the year has fallen to 656 words; at the start of May it had been 691. To the start of June I’ve published 41,978 words here. I don’t know if that counts picture captions and alt text, and have not the faintest idea how it counts LaTeX symbols.

As of the start of June I’ve published 1,467 things, which drew 106,429 views from a recorded 58,907 unique visitors.

I’m hoping next week to start publishing the All 2020 Mathematics A-to-Z. Posts from it should be tagged so as to appear at this link. If you want to be sure you don’t miss any of them, I’m quite flattered. The RSS feed for all my essays as this link, and if you lack an RSS reader, you’re mistaken! You can get a free account at Dreamwidth or Livejournal and use their Reading page to read any RSS feed you like. Or you can click the “Follow Nebusresearch” button on this page, and add it to your WordPress reader.

For a short while there my Twitter account of @Nebusj was working. It’s gone back to where it will just accept WordPress’s automated announcements of posts here, though. I can’t do anything with it. I do have an account on the mathematics-themed Mastodon instance, @nebusj@mathstodon.xyz, and occasionally manage to even just hang out chatting there. It’s hard to get a place in a new social media environment. You need a hook, and you need a playful bit of business anyone can do with you, which both serve to give you an identity. Then you need someone who’s already established to vouch for you as being okay. The A-to-Z is a pretty good hook but the rest is a bit hard. I’m in there trying, though.

Thanks always for reading, however you do it.


Also, because I will someday need this again: to write the ^\circ symbol in WordPress LaTeX, you need the symbol string ^\circ and do not ask me why it’s not, like, \deg (or better, \degree) instead.

How May 2019 Treated My Mathematics Blog


It’s two days past when I wanted to do my self-inspection, but that’s all right. Better to have a thing done than not. I had another month of decline on the mathematics blog, inexplicable except for my going and vanishing for a week at a time without notice or much interesting content.

I published ten things in May, my quietest month in years. And the number of things I post seems to be the most important thing I can control to encourage readers. Well, I could change the time of day that I post. For several years now I’ve posted everything at 18:00 Universal Time. That’s about 2 pm Eastern Daylight Time, in my home time zone. It’s possible another hour might serve my interests in being read better.

There were 981 page views in May, down from 1,020 in April (twelve posts) and 1,391 in March (fourteen posts). It’s the first time I didn’t break a thousand since December 2017 (another eleven-post month). The number of unique visitors rose slightly, though: 721 unique visitors in May, compared to 668 in April and 954 in March. (December 2017 had 599 unique visitors.) There is probably a great deal of fluctuation in all this.

Bar chart showing about four and a half years of readership figures which are fairly constant, with a few peaks in the spring and summer of last year.
What’s fun about looking over this many months at once is trying to spot where I was running A To Z sequences. You can actually see people responding to sudden, two- and three-month stretches of regularly-published high-quality articles. It’s almost a lesson or something.

The number of likes continued to be erratic. 43 things were liked here in May, up from April’s 40, down from March’s 97. For what it’s worth the twelve-month running average leading up to May was 72 likes per month. This was an unliked month. The number of comments had one of its sporadic upticks, with 12 comments. There’d been 14 in April and a near-record-low four in March. Again for what it’s worth the twelve-month running average is 25 comments per month. That range does include some of the A To Z months, which invite comments in a way I don’t seem to be able to do normally.

163 different posts got at least one view in May. The ones that got the most were a couple perennials and one that I figured to be liked, for how many words I put into it:

The record grooves and the trapezoids people always ask about. I figured a nice meaty question like the continuity of a familiar function would get readers. What’s always a bit of a surprise is which Reading the Comics post gets the most readers in a month. Generically I’d expect something posted early in the month. For it to be one that posted the 19th? A bunch of people really like Frank and Ernest. That’s the only explanation.

Mercator-style map of the world, with the United States in the darkest pink and most of the Americas in a soft pink. Western Europe, Russia, India, China, and a fair bit of southeast Asia an Australia and New Zealand are also that uniform pink. Africa and the Middle East are grey, lacking readers.
You wouldn’t believe how long I spent trying to clean off the bit of monitor dust that was sitting there in the South Pacific before I worked out that it was Fiji. Well, you probably would; it was just a couple seconds and I worked it out by moving the window with the map on it.

There were 61 countries or country-like organizations to send me readers in May. There had been 54 countries for April and 59 for March. This past month 16 of them were single-reader countries. In April there were also 16 single-reader countries; in March, 17. Here’s the full roster:

Country Readers
United States 665
India 34
Canada 33
United Kingdom 31
Australia 19
Hong Kong SAR China 14
Germany 13
Mexico 10
France 8
South Korea 8
Nepal 7
New Zealand 7
Poland 7
Singapore 7
South Africa 7
Sweden 7
Chile 6
Denmark 6
Italy 6
Pakistan 5
Spain 5
Colombia 4
Panama 4
Slovenia 4
Algeria 3
Belize 3
Brazil 3
Egypt 3
Malaysia 3
Netherlands 3
Argentina 2
Bosnia & Herzegovina 2
China 2
Finland 2
Greece 2
Guam 2
Hungary 2
Ireland 2
Israel 2
Jamaica 2
Morocco 2
Norway 2
Peru 2
Thailand 2
Turkey 2
Austria 1
Bangladesh 1
Croatia 1
European Union 1 (*)
Fiji 1
Guatemala 1
Indonesia 1
Japan 1
Kuwait 1
Nigeria 1
Philippines 1
Puerto Rico 1
Russia 1
Taiwan 1
Uruguay 1
Vietnam 1

The European Union was the only single-reader country-like structure in May to have also been a single-reader place in April. None of the other countries have a streak going. Whoever my lone reader was in Jordan left after five months. The block of readers from Sweden has also dissipated but not disappeared altogether.

This year through the start of June I published 59 posts. This had a total of 57,871 words. This was 11,194 words published in May alone, for an average 1,119 words per post that month. My year-to-date average is 981 words per post. I’d been averaging 953 words per post at the start of May.

Through the start of June there’ve been 264 total likes of posts around here, an average of 4.5 likes per posting. That’s the same average likes per posting as the start of May saw. There’ve been a total of 91 comments, an average of 1.5 comments per posting. I notice, too, that this implies 17 comments in May, while the statistics panel I get claimed there were 12 comments in May. I think the discrepancy reflects pingbacks, one of my own posts referencing another. To verify this would need minutes of looking over the comments received here, though. So it’s sad to think of how this will never be done.

As of the start of June I’d posted 1,261 things here. They had a total of 78,957 page views from a 40,294 recorded unique visitors.

If you’d like to be a regular reader, there’s many ways to do it. One is to add my essays to your RSS reader, whatever that may be. If you do that, I will receive no statistics or logs or anything about your readership. It’ll be your secret. For a less-secret way, you can use the “Follow Nebusresearch” button, at the upper right corner of this page.

And if you follow me on Twitter as @Nebusj months will start with quality content like the above, of a couple pictures of a rabbit I saw from a parking lot. Thought you might like that.

How May 2018 Treated My Mathematics Blog


And now the easiest post I write all month: my review of what my readership looked like the past 31 days. I have to admit once more I’m not satisfied with my writership. I didn’t get some projects going that I wanted; but that’s all right. I’ve got five big ideas in mind for the coming several months. Thinking up what to do is always the hard part, other than actually doing it. So that’s my part. Now on to your, the readers’, part. Here I pause while savoring my last moments of not knowing the response was bad.

Oh, how about that. It wasn’t bad. It was even good. Readership was back up in May, rising to 1,274 page views all told. This ties with January for the second-greatest number of readers so far this year. It’s a fair bit up from April’s 1,117. Down from March’s 1,779, but what wouldn’t be? The number of unique visitors rose too, to 837. That’s below March’s tantalizing 999, but up from April’s 731. I did post 12 pieces in May, compared to 11 in April, and 16 in March. I suspect that the number of posts published is the only thing in my control that can influence readership numbers.

A bar chart of readership figures, mostly circling around 1,000 readers per month with a spike two months ago.
Of course the real information is in the Views Per Visitor statistic, but I don’t know what it means.

I can say what people were looking for. The most popular post of the month was, once again, about the number of grooves on a record’s side. I think it’s been getting more popular lately. This shows the power of uploading a better picture of that Buggles album cover, I suppose. The five top posts of the month:

So it’s worth spending some time improving the graphics for my crushingly detailed examination of the area of trapezoids. Writing blogs always say use quality graphics for your articles and it turns out they’re so right.

I struggle still with reader engagement, and I understand that. A lot of what I write is in improv terms hard to advance. I need to be better at writing open things that encourage response. There were a mere 17 comments in May, improved from April’s 13 but still not much at all, especially compared to March’s 53. Which still isn’t great but is something. There were 73 things liked in May, the same number as in April. And way down from March’s 142.

What countries sent me readers? Mostly the United States, as always. But here’s the full roster:

Country Readers
United States 915
Canada 60
India 59
United Kingdom 36
Australia 21
Germany 12
Puerto Rico 11
Denmark 10
Philippines 10
Singapore 10
Malaysia 9
Slovenia 9
Indonesia 8
New Zealand 7
South Africa 7
Israel 6
Spain 6
Brazil 5
Hong Kong SAR China 5
Italy 5
Switzerland 5
Sweden 4
Vietnam 4
Greece 3
Ireland 3
Norway 3
Russia 3
Albania 2
Belgium 2
Ghana 2
Japan 2
Pakistan 2
Slovakia 2
Thailand 2
Turkey 2
Algeria 1
Austria 1
Brunei 1
Costa Rica 1
Egypt 1
European Union 1
Finland 1 (*)
France 1
Jamaica 1
Kuwait 1
Mauritius 1
Morocco 1
Netherlands 1
Poland 1
Qatar 1
Saudi Arabia 1
Serbia 1 (**)
South Korea 1
Sri Lanka 1
Saint Kitts & Nevis 1 (*)
Trinidad & Tobago 1
Ukraine 1

That’s 58 countries which sent me readers over the month. That’s three months in a row the total’s been 58 countries so I assume WordPress is just making these numbers up and figures 58 looks about right. Not suspiciously few, not suspiciously many. We’ll see.

There were 22 single-reader countries. That’s different at least; in April there were 14, and in March 15. Finland and Saint Kitts & Nevis were single-reader countries in April also. Serbia’s been single-reader for three months running now.

The Insights panel tells me that for 2018 so far I’ve had 66 posts, and have accumulated a total of 443 likes and 161 comments. There’s 55,677 total words. This means I published 10,836 total words over the month, which is more than I did in April. I thought I was tired. My year’s average right now is 843.6 words per post; at the end of April that was 830.4. My posts for May alone averaged 903 words. The April posts averaged 772. I knew I was getting more verbose. There’s 2.4 comments and 6.7 likes on average for the post. At the end of April this was 3.5 comments and 6.9 likes per post.

The month officially starts with 62,824 pages viewed from a tracked 30,339 unique visitors. I’ve officially got 759 WordPress visitors, who’re following through their Readers page. I’d be glad if you joined them: you can use the button at the upper-right corner of this page to follow via WordPress. You can also see me as @Nebusj on Twitter. And if you’d prefer you can follow the RSS feed for my posts. If you do that I get absolutely no information about what you read or how interesting you find it, and that’s fine by me.

We ended up putting 38 goldfish back in the pond. The reader with long-term memory may remember we brought 52 in. The fish had a hard winter, one afflicted by water quality issues and feeding issues. We’re trying to recover emotionally, and to work out a plan for better fish care next winter.

How May 2017 Treated My Mathematics Blog


The big news is that in May my mathematics blog crept back above a thousand page views. It had been a whole month since it had reached this threshold of purely imaginary significance. For what was a slow writing month — only twelve posts — marred by my computer dying and a nasty cold the final week, the numbers aren’t bad.

In May there were 1,029 pages viewed here. That’s up from April’s 994 and March’s 1,026. The number of unique visitors is down for the third month running, though, down to 662 from April’s 696 and March’s 699. The happy implication: people reading more posts as they visit. You know, liking my writing more.

Views and Visitors for my mathematics blog, January 2015 through May 2017 with as much June as there's been so far. It's all been kind of stable, rocking back and forth around 1,000 views and like 650 visitors per month, for the past year or so.
I still feel like trying to rig up some compensation for that bizarre event back in … September 2015, wasn’t it? … when suddenly everybody’s statistics everywhere dropped and we blamed it on them no longer counting mobile devices. But if that were so, surely they’ve put them back? There’s no way the non-mobile-device readership is growing fast enough that these numbers should be about stable.

I’d think, anyway. There were 78 posts liked in May, down from April’s 90 and March’s 85. Not to pout or anything but WordPress does tell me that in June 2015 there were 518 likes around here and I can’t think, gosh, what was different then? … Well, it was one of my A To Z months, with posts 28 days of the month, and that usually encourages cross-reading. The number of comments just cratered, though: there were only 8 all month, down from 16 in April and 15 in May. Clearly I’m failing to encourage conversation and I don’t know how to turn that around.

The low comments count does confirm something for me, though. I switched the way I cross-link to posts here so that I use the full URLs for articles instead of the wp.me tinyURLs. The full URLs create trackback links and are regarded as comments that need approval from me, but they clearly don’t count as comments in the monthly totals. Since I like the trackback links — I fool myself into thinking people use them to learn about related subjects — I’ll stick with that. I had shifted so as not to confound my comment counts on these statistics pages.

According to Insights the most popular day for reading stuff was Thursday, with 16 percent of page views then. In April Sunday was the busiest day again with 16 percent of page views; in March it was 18 percent, on Tuesdays. I may give up on tracking this; obviously, each day is about equally likely to be the most popular. The most popular reading time was the hour of 6 pm, with 11 percent of page views coming before 7 pm. In April the same hour got 11 percent of page views again. In March it got 12 percent. I might experiment with the designated posting hour to find a more popular time, but obviously most people are going to read right after the thing is published.

So what was popular writing around here in April? I don’t want to say I knew this would happen, but one of the top five posts was one for which I wrote eleven words, and which I predicted to myself would be among the motnh’s top posts.

  1. How Many Grooves Are On A Record’s Side? People want simple answers to their questions.
  2. Reading the Comics, May 27, 2017: Panels Edition and I’m surprised this took the lead in the month’s Reading the Comics races, given how little time it had to do it.
  3. How Many Trapezoids I Can Draw as see above comment about people wanting answers
  4. Theorem Thursday: The Jordan Curve Theorem which I was thinking about at the mall on Thursday. Something or other made me think of it and how much I liked my description of how you prove the theorem.
  5. Dabbing and the Pythagorean Theorem which, really, I should do more like given how popular this kind of post is.

Now the roster of the 52 countries that sent me readers in May, and how many each of them did. Spoiler: the United States tops the list.

Country Views
United States 658
Canada 40
United Kingdom 38
Australia 28
Italy 23
India 19
Singapore 15
Slovenia 13
Turkey 13
Spain 12
South Africa 11
Austria 10
Switzerland 10
Denmark 7
Mexico 7
New Zealand 7
Puerto Rico 7
Philippines 6
Brazil 5
Oman 5
Russia 5
Sweden 5
Germany 4
Chile 3
France 3
Netherlands 3
Bangladesh 2
European Union 2
Indonesia 2
Pakistan 2
Peru 2
Argentina 1 (*)
Bahamas 1
Belgium 1
Colombia 1
Czech Republic 1
Finland 1 (**)
Iceland 1
Israel 1
Japan 1
Nigeria 1
Poland 1
Portugal 1 (**)
Saudi Arabia 1
Slovakia 1
Sri Lanka 1
St. Kitts & Nevis 1
Taiwan 1
US Virgin Islands 1
Ukraine 1
Uruguay 1
Venezuela 1

There had been 45 countries sending readers in April and 56 in March. European Union makes its big return.

There were 21 single-reader countries in May, way up from April’s 10 but still down from March’s 26. Argentina was a single-reader country in April also. Finland and Portugal have been single-reader countries for three months.

The month starts with 49,247 page views from some 22,212 logged distinct visitors since WordPress started telling us about those. WordPress tells me also there are 662 followers on WordPress, people who’ve gone and clicked the ‘Follow On WordPress’ button at the top right of the page in the hopes that I’ll follow back and increase their readership count. We all know how the game works.

And then what are popular search terms bringing folks here? What you’d expect given the most popular posts.

  • comics conversation
  • how many grooves are on typical record or cd ? how they are arranged?
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe.
  • peacetips football prediction
  • only yestetday dividing fractions
  • animated rolling dice 7

Plus some 146 unknown search terms. I’d be interested to know what those are too.

Well, thanks all of you for being around for this. I hope it’s a good month ahead.

You know, the arrangement of CDs is probably an interesting subject. I love that sort of technical-detail stuff too. It’s probably only slightly mathematics but I bet I can find a pretext to include it here. If someone’s interested.