Reading the Comics, November 30, 2019: The Glances Edition


I like this scheme where I use the Sunday publication slot to list comics that mention mathematics without inspiring conversation. I may need a better name for that branch of the series, though. But, nevertheless, here are comic strips from last week that don’t need much said about them.

Mell Lazarus’s Momma rerun for the 24th has Momma complain about Francis’s ability to do arithmetic. It originally ran the 23rd of February, 2014.

John Deering’s Strange Brew for the 24th features Pythagoras, here being asked about his angles. I’m not aware of anything actually called a Pythagorean Angle, but there’s enough geometric things with Pythagoras’s name attached for the joke to make sense.

Maria Scrivan’s Half Full for the 25th is a Venn Diagram joke for the week. It doesn’t quite make sense as a Venn Diagram, as it’s not clear to me that “invasive questions” is sensibly a part of “food”. But it’s a break from every comic strip doing a week full of jokes about turkeys preferring to not be killed.

Tony Carrillo’s F Minus for the 26th is set in mathematics class. And talks about how the process of teaching mathematics is “an important step on the road to hating math”, which is funny because it’s painfully true.

Jonathan Mahood’s Bleeker: The Rechargeable Dog for the 27th had Bleeker trying to help Skip with his mathematics homework. By the 28th Skip was not getting much done.

Bill Watterson’s Calvin and Hobbes rerun for the 30th wrapped up a storyline that saw Calvin being distracted away from his mathematics homework. The strip originally ran the 2nd of December, 1989.


And that’s that. Later this week I’ll publish something on the comic strips with substantial mathematics mention. And I do hope to have a couple thoughts on the recently-concluded Fall 2019 A-to-Z sequence. Plus, it’s the start of a new month, so that means I’ll be posting a map of the world. Maybe some other things too.

Reading the Comics, July 23, 2018: Bad Mathematics Edition


I apologize for a post rougher than my norm. It has not been a gentle week. I am carrying on as best I can, but then, who isn’t? There is a common element to three of the strips featured this time around, so I have a meaningful name.

Steve McGarry’s KidTown for the 22nd of July is a kids-information panel. It’s a delivery system for some neat trivia about numbers. I’d never encountered the bit about the factorial of 10 (10 x 9 x 8 x 7 x 6 x 5 x 4 x 3 x 2 x 1) being as many seconds as there are in six weeks. I’m curious how I missed that. But it’s definitely one of those slightly useful bits of calendar mathematics to keep around. Some other useful ones are that three years is about 1100 days, and that a century is about three billion seconds. That line about 12 + 3 – 4 + 5 + 67 + 8 + 9 is probably a useful answer to some mathematics riddle such as might beset Nancy.

Informational panel noting, among other things, that 10! seconds are exactly six weeks; that 111111111 x 111111111 is 12345678987654321, things like that.
Steve McGarry’s KidTown for the 22nd of July, 2018. These are all cute enough facts. The “Use The News” activity suggestion is a pretty bad reach, though.

John Zakour and Scott Roberts’s Maria’s Day for the 23rd depicts Maria misunderstanding what it is to be bad at mathematics. The Star Wars movie episode numbers show a quirky indexing scheme, yes. But the numbers in this case are mostly nominal variables. If we spoke of the movies only by their titles … well, it would be harder to guess whether The Empire Strikes Back or Return of the Jedi came first. All the names suggest is that they ought to follow on something else happening beforehand. And people would likely use numbers for shorthand anyway. Star Trek fans talk still about the odd- and even-numbered movies, even though no Star Trek movie’s had a number attached to it since 1991.

Maria: 'So Star Wars 4 came first, and first one was made fourth?' Dad: 'Yep.' Maria: 'And the guy who made 'em is all rich now?' Dad: 'Yeah.' Maria: 'So you can be bad at math and still be a big success.' Dad: 'Wrong lesson.'
John Zakour and Scott Roberts’s Maria’s Day for the 23rd of July, 2018. Also you can be a professional writer and fumble, as happened when the first panel was written or lettered. (I hate when I do that myself and shouldn’t tease Zakour and Roberts so.)

A nominal variable is as the … er … name suggests. It’s a way to reference something, but the value doesn’t mean very much. We see these, often with numbers attached, often enough to not notice it. We start to realize it when we have those moments of thinking, isn’t it odd that the office building starts numbering rooms from 101, rather than, say, 1? Or that there’s no numbers between (say) 129 and 201? Using a number carries some information, in that it suggests we think there is a preferred order for things. But your neighborhood would be no different if all the building addresses were 1000 higher, and the Star Wars movies would be no different if the one from 1977 came to be dubbed Episode 14 instead.

(I am open to an argument that the Star Wars episode numbers are ordinal variables. This is why I hedged by calling them “mostly” nominal. An ordinal variable describes some preferred order for the things. The difference between numbers isn’t particularly meaningful, just the relationship between them. And, yeah, it would be peculiar if The Empire Strikes Back had a higher episode number than did Return of the Jedi. Viewing the movies in that order would create several apparent continuity errors. But there are differences between internal chronology and production order and other ways one might watch the movies. But it seems to me the ordinary use for the numbers, if someone uses them at all, is as a label.)

Francis: 'Momma, can you write me a check for my rent?' Momma: 'Not right now, dear. 60 Minutes just started . It's about grown men who can't do simple arithmetic. Can you wait till it's over?' Francis: 'How long will it take?'
Mell Lazarus’s Momma rerun for the 23rd of July, 2018. As you maybe guessed, it first appeared the 23rd of July, 2007. I make no claims about appearances since then and before July 2018. The strip ran a lot of reruns in the months before Lazarus’s death.

Mell Lazarus’s Momma for the 23rd is another strip built on people being bad at mathematics. Arithmetic, anyway. I’m not sure this quite counts as an arithmetic joke. Granting the (correct) assumption that an episode of 60 Minutes is ordinarily 60 minutes long, is not recognizing how long the show will take really a use of mathematics? Isn’t it more reading comprehension? … And to be fair to the ever-beleaguered Francis, it’s rather more likely 60 Minutes just had one segment about grown men incapable of doing arithmetic. Asking how long that is likely to take is a fair question.

Arrogant deer: 'OK, Dennis. What's five plus five?' Dennis: 'Ooh. Ah, that would be ten?' Arrogant :'Now, subtract five from ten.' Dennis: 'Ummm ... eight. No, two. No, six! Nine?' Arrogant: 'That's it. You're the weakest member of the herd.' Dennis: 'C'mon, guys! Just because I'm stupid doesn't mean I'm weak!'
Adrian Raeside’s The Other Coast for the 23rd of July, 2018. So would it have improved the joke if Dennis had fumbled adding five and five too? Or does it make Dennis look dumber to not know that if five plus five equals ten, then ten minus five has to equal five? Genuinely don’t know which would be the better setup.

Adrian Raeside’s The Other Coast for the 23rd is another strip conflating arithmetic skill with intelligence. And intelligence with fitness. It’s flattering stuff, at least for people who are good at arithmetic and who feel flattered to be called intelligent. But there’s a lot of presumption here. And a common despicable attitude: merry little eugenicists (they’re always cheery about it, aren’t they?) always conclude they are fit ones.


Other essays that discuss topics raised in KidTown are on this link. When I’ve had cause to discuss Maria’s Day those essays are here. Other times I’ve talked about Momma should be on this link. And other essays that mention The Other Coast should be on this link. It’s a new tag, so it might take some time to get other entries.

As ever, the whole set of Reading the Comics posts should be at this link.