Reading the Comics, January 9, 2018: I Go On About Johnny Appleseed Edition


This was a slow week for mathematically-themed comic strips. Such things happen. I put together a half-dozen that see on-topic enough to talk about, but I stretched to do it. You’ll see.

Mark Anderson’s Andertoons for the 6th mentions addition as one of the things you learn in an average day of elementary school. I can’t help noticing also the mention of Johnny Appleseed, who’s got a weird place in my heart as he and I share a birthday. He got to it first. Although Johnny Appleseed — John Champan — is legendary for scattering apple seeds, that’s not what he mostly did. He would more often grow apple-tree nurseries, from which settlers could buy plants and demonstrate they were “improving” their plots. He was also committed to spreading the word of Emanuel Swedenborg’s New Church, one of those religious movements that you somehow don’t hear about. But there was this like 200-year-long stretch where a particular kind of idiosyncratic thinker was Swedenborgian, or at least influenced by that. I don’t know offhand of any important Swedenborgian mathematicians, I admit, but I’m glad to hear if someone has news.

Wavehead, walking home, talking to another kid: 'Today we learned about Columbus planting apple seeds using two-digit addition. I also daydreamed a lot.'
Mark Anderson’s Andertoons for the 6th of January, 2019. Andertoons often appears in these essays. You can see the proof of that Andertoons claim at this link.

Justin Thompson’s MythTickle rerun for the 9th mentions “algebra” as something so dreadful that even being middle-aged is preferable. Everyone has their own tastes, yes, although it would be the same joke if it were “gym class” or something. (I suppose that’s not one word. “Dodgeball” would do, but I never remember playing it. It exists just as a legendarily feared activity, to me.) Granting, though, that I had a terrible time with the introduction to algebra class I had in middle school.

Karma: 'What's wrong, Dziva?' Dziva: 'Watching Boody act so young and carefree makes me long for my own youth. I could run faster then, eat more and care less. I'm getting sad about it. Karma, isn't there some magical word that could make me quit wanting to be young again? Some profound reminder that being a kid wasn't so --- ' Karma: 'Algebra.' (Both rest, happy.)
Justin Thompson’s MythTickle rerun for the 9th of January, 2019. MythTickle has only barely appeared before in these essays. You can see the proof of that MythTickle claim at this link.

Tom Wilson’s Ziggy for the 9th is a very early Pi Day joke, so, there’s that. There’s not much reason a take-a-number dispenser couldn’t give out π, or other non-integer numbers. What the numbers are doesn’t matter. It’s just that the dispensed numbers need to be in order. It should be helpful if there’s a clear idea how uniformly spaced the numbers are, so there’s some idea how long a wait to expect between the currently-serving number and whatever number you’ve got. But that only helps if you have a fair idea of how long an order should on average take.

Ziggy, at a pie counter, takes a number. It's pi.
Tom Wilson’s Ziggy for the 9th of January, 2019. Ziggy has turned up once or twice in these essays. You can see the proof of that Ziggy claim at this link.

I’ll close out last week’s comics soon. The next Reading the Comics post, like all the earlier ones, should be at this link.

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Reading the Comics, October 18, 2018: Quick Half-Week Edition


There were enough mathematically-themed comic strips last week to split across two essays. The first half of them don’t take too much time to explain. Let me show you.

Henry Scarpelli and Craig Boldman’s Archie for the 15th is the pie-chart wordplay joke for the week. I don’t remember there ever being pie at the high school cafeteria, but back when I was in high school I often skipped lunch to hang out in the computer room.

Jughead: 'Ummm! Nummm!' Archie: 'Quiet, Jug! We've got to get this group project finished!' Jughead: 'Mmm! I'm hungry! I'm off to the lunchroom for a snack!' Archie: 'I told you it was a mistake to include a pie chart in our report!'
Henry Scarpelli and Craig Boldman’s Archie rerun for the 15th of October, 2018. Oh gads. If Jughead makes this much noise just imagining food then when he really eats he’s got to be one of those people you can hear from the next state over. I have no information about when this strip first ran.

Will Henry’s Wallace the Brave for the 15th alludes to a report on trapezoids. I can’t imagine what about this would be so gold-star-worthy when I’ve surely already written plenty about trapezoids. … Really, that thing trying to classify how many different kinds of trapezoids there are would be my legacy to history if I hadn’t also written about how many grooves are on a record’s side.

Teacher: 'Wallace, Spud, fantastic report on trapezoids. Gold stars for each.' (Both are delighted; girl in the back says 'Lamesville.') Spud: 'I haven't gotten a gold star since I got my head stuck in that bannister.' Wallace: 'They buttered you up like an ear of corn.'
Will Henry’s Wallace the Brave for the 15th of October, 2018. All right, the strip is only marginally on topic. It and Breaking Cat News are the syndicated comic strips I’ve been most excited for since Richard Thompson wasn’t able to continue Cul de Sac.

Thaves’s Frank and Ernest for the 17th is, for me, extremely relatable content. I don’t say that my interest in mathematics is entirely because there was this Berenstain Bears book about jobs which made it look like a mathematician’s job was to do sums in an observatory on the Moon. But it didn’t hurt. When I joke about how seven-year-old me wanted to be the astronaut who drew Popeye, understand, that’s not much comic exaggeration.

Student in mathematics class: 'I'd like a career where I solve simple subtraction problems like this. I'd be making a difference.'
Thaves’s Frank and Ernest for the 17th of October, 2018. “I’d be getting taped to the doors of mathematics teacher’s classrooms — saaaaaay!”

Justin Thompson’s Mythtickle rerun for the 17th is a timely choice about lotteries and probabilities. Vlad raises a fair point about your chance of being struck by lightning. It seems like that’s got to depend on things like where you are. But it does seem like we know what we mean when we say “the chance you’ll be hit by lightning”. At least I think it means “the probability that a person will be hit by lightning at some point in their life, if we have no information about any environmental facts that might influence this”. So it would be something like the number of people struck by lightning over the course of a year divided by the number of people in the world that year. You might have a different idea of what “the chance you’ll be hit by lightning” means, and it’s worth trying to think what precisely that does mean to you.

Dziva: 'Lottery tickets? Are you bats? Vlad, your chances of getting hit by lightning are better than winning a lottery jackpot.' Vlad: 'Lightning where? The location of the lightning is a variable that should be included in your determination. So do you mean like, lightning in the Atacama Desert where it never rains, or like lightning in, say, Transylvania? Cause back home, let me tell ya ... ' Dziva: 'Oh, I got it, I got it, I ... um.' [ Transylvanian convenience store with a werewolf cashier; lightning outside. ] Dziva: 'Two computer lotto-picks on the BIG one and make it SNAPPY, wolfie!!!'
Justin Thompson’s Mythtickle rerun for the 17th of October, 2018. Not to step on a joke Thompson left nicely underplayed, but I find funny the premise that of course the clerk in the Transylvanian convenience store is a werewolf. I have no information about when this strip first ran.

Lotteries are one of those subjects that a particular kind of nerd likes to feel all smug about. Pretty sure every lottery comic ever has drawn a comment about a tax on people who can’t do mathematics. This one did too. But then try doing the mathematics. The Mega Millions lottery, in the US, has a jackpot for the first drawing this week estimated at more than a billion dollars. The chance of winning is about one in 300 million. A ticket costs two dollars. So what is the expectation value of playing? You lose two dollars right up front, in the cost of the ticket. What do you get back? A one-in-300-million chance of winning a billion dollars. That is, you can expect to get back a bit more than three dollars. The implication is: you make a profit of dollar on each ticket you buy. There’s something a bit awry here, as you can tell from my decision not to put my entire savings into lottery tickets this week. But I won’t say someone is foolish or wrong if they buy a couple.

Student, to the teacher in front of a blackboard full of symbols: 'Can't you just round it off?'
Mike Baldwin’s Cornered for the 18th of October, 2018. What is that grit on the teacher’s desk, to the reader’s right of the pen?

Mike Baldwin’s Cornered for the 18th is a bit of mathematics-circling wordplay, featuring the blackboard full of equations. The blackboard doesn’t have any real content on it, but it is a good visual shorthand. And it does make me notice that rounding a quantity off is, in a way, making it simpler. If we are only a little interested in the count of the thing, “two thousand forty” or even “two thousand” may be more useful than the exact 2,038. The loss of precision may be worth it for the ease with which the rounded-off version is remembered and communicated.


If you’d like to see more Reading the Comics posts then try this link. Other essays which mention Archie should be at this link. Topics raised by Wallace the Brave should be at this link. Frank and Ernest is the subject of essays at this link. Topics brought up by Mythtickle are at this link. It’s a new tag, though, and I’m not sure there’ll ever be another use of it. And this and other essays mentioning Cornered are at this link. And do please stick around for more of my Fall 2018 Mathematics A-To-Z, coming twice a week through the rest of the year, I hope.