How September 2015 Treated My Mathematics Blog


So, well, that was disappointing. My readership was off in September. The month saw the fewest page views since November of 2014. The number of unique visitors was only back to about what it was in June of 2015, though, which is less alarming. Still, I can’t fault WordPress’s suspect statistics, not without inconsistency. My humor blog saw its highest readership on record and if I accept that, I have to accept the other.

The humor blog readership I understand. I started explaining what the heck was going on in Apartment 3-G and it’s been really baffling for a long while now because nothing has been going on since February, maybe March at the latest. You can see how that attracts eager readers.

But here’s the sad numbers count: there were 708 views on the mathematics blog in September, down from 909 in August and 863 in July. And well done from June’s record of 1,051.

The number of unique visitors was 381, down from August’s 506 and July’s 415. June had only 367 unique visitors, but that was part of the big Summer 2015 Mathematics A To Z project. That’s probably why more people were reading, too.

I can’t even point to signs of reader engagement. The number of likes was down to 188, compared to August’s 282 and July’s 381. Extrapolating, November should see me get a negative number of likes. Comments are even worse: after three months in a row of about a hundred comments each there were only 25 in September.

So as I say, disappointing. I can think of a few things I did differently in September. The most obvious is that I didn’t have the time I needed to go around to other mathematics blogs and pay visits. I can’t fault people not coming around to me when I don’t come around to them. And I can admit that September didn’t have the richest diversity of postings. A lot of it was Reading the Comics posts, which are fun but I admit also prone to sameness. On the other hand, those are the most popular posts too. I haven’t found a new project that engages my imagination the way the A To Z did, although I think the Set Tour has promise.

I would also put some blame on WordPress’s Publicize, which they keep making worse and worse. See, Publicize announces new posts to Twitter and whatever other social media networks you have linked to it. And in the old days of, like, May, it just worked. By default it posted the name of the article and a wp.me shortened link. If you wanted to customize this you could hit an ‘edit’ button and the article name and wp.me shortened link were there at the start, and it was easy to add a short sentence to tell people what’s happening.

But in June they stopped with the wp.me shortened links; instead it shows as much of the full URL as fits in the Twitter 140-character limit after whatever text you enter. And last month they made it worse. It’ll give the article name as a suggested default publicity post, but you have to copy-paste or retype the name to get even that. The message WordPress is sending is, clearly, ‘stop using Publicize’, although what they have as a substitue is unclear.

I suspect what they mean for us to do is use the new modernized article-entry page. The trouble is, the page is awful. It might be salvageable, or something I could get used to, in time. But it’s also this very watery and Ajax-dependent thing that assumes you have fast, reliable Internet. And I don’t. I have AT&T, which has no interest in providing high-speed Internet to my neighborhood and possibly my city. They aren’t even willing to pretend they mean to bring it in anytime soon. We’d dump them happily but the only alternative right now is Kabletown and goodness knows that’s a recipe for disaster. I suspect AT&T and Kabletown have decided not to compete for the Lansing, Michigan, market and we’re stuck between awful we know and awful we know we’d flee to.

Anyway, my suspicion is that the equivalent of Publicize for the newfangled WordPress add-a-post page works better. But that is blaming WordPress for my own laziness; there’s no reason I couldn’t put in the post and wp.me link and a clear #math tag so people know what they’re getting into. It just seemed like too much work. I suppose for a week or two I should try changing just that and see if there’s an appreciable difference.

I’m sorry to turn all this into a round of crankiness, especially when I can think of easy things I should be doing to get better results. I’m just sulking. It’ll pass.

How August 2015 Treated My Mathematics Blog


August was my first full month after the end of the A-to-Z project. How would dropping from the nearly-daily publication in June and early July to a relatively sedate three times a week affect my readership and reader engagement? As ever, the data is mixed.

According to WordPress’s counters, the number of page views rose to 909, up from July’s 863 and down from busy June’s 1,051. I like the upward trend, especially since the number of unique visitors rose to 506. That’s a record high. It’s up appreciably from July’s 415 and June’s 367. However, I have to suspect the numbers. On the 20th of August the blog came under the attention of what looks like some kind of content aggregator or advertising site. That sent me 90 clicks on the 20th, and while that’s flattering I have my doubts anybody was actually reading anything.

The number of likes I received over the month dropped to 296. That’s down from July’s 381 and June’s 518. That sounds like a calamitous drop until you remember that in June I posted 28 things, July 24, and August a mere 14. On a per-post basis that’s slightly over 21 likes per posting in August, up from about 16 in July and 18.5 in June. I suspect there’s no meaningful trend here. The number of comments dropped slightly, with only 95 received in August. There were 100 in July and 114 in June. That’s hardly a difference, though, and it’s a very nice-looking comment-per-post trend.

The two most popular posts in August were reblogged things. Well, at least people liked what was pointed out to them. After that it was mostly comic strips, which I’m comfortable with. I like the range of topics they inspire me to write.

  1. How I Impressed My Wife: Part 1
  2. Original Problem! Expanding Galaxies and Rates of Change
  3. Reading the Comics, August 10, 2015: How People Think Edition
  4. Do You Have To Understand This?
  5. Reading the Comics, August 3, 2015: Things That Make Me Cranky Edition

The largest number of readers came from the United States, at 496. That’s just about what came here from the United States in July (502). Second-highest was Canada at 45, and third-highest again the United Kingdom, 35. The Philippines came in fourth, with 26 readers. (They were in fifth with 37 readers in July. Rankings are weird things.) Austria gave me 23 page views, and India and Spain sent 22 each. For India that’s a fair jump over July’s 14.

Single-reader countries in August were quite a list: Argentina, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bulgaria, Colombia, Denmark, Indonesia, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Morocco, Nepal, New Zealand, Palestinian Territories, Portugal, Senegal, Slovakia, South Korea, Sudan, Switzerland, Tunisia, and Venezuela. Denmark, Nepal, and Portugal were also single-reader countries in July and nobody’s on a three-month streak there.

Among the search terms intriguing me the past month were:

  • apollo 13 rewritten checklist
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe
  • fox trot impossible bobby driving math problem gocomics
  • “the price is right” any number game
  • bringing breakfast cartoons
  • 86164 seconds
  • electro mechanical research sarasota
  • almost everywhere concept

Of course I understand the “86164 seconds” query, because that ties in to the delightful animated movie Arthur Christmas and the deep existential dread one of its plot points inspires.

August ends with the blog having received 27,381 total page views, and 9,967 distinct visitors. There’s 517 people listed as WordPress followers. And my comments stand at 2,054. I don’t know who had lucky number 2,038th.

Finally I should include a reminder to folks who are reading this blog post to read these blog posts. There’s this “Follow Blog via Email” link on the upper right of the page. If you have an RSS reader, https://nebusresearch.wordpress.com/feed/ will give you posts. And my Twitter account is @Nebusj. Thanks for existing and all that.

My Mathematics Blog’s July 2015 Statistics, Plus Their Implications


Start of the month, so, it’s time to review my readership numbers. July was not as busy a month as June. I expected that. With the wrap-up of the A To Z glossary there were fewer posts in July than in June, and one can expect people to come to read posts. There weren’t that many fewer — 24 posts in July, versus 28 in June — but every bit counts.

So the number of page views dropped from 1,051 in June to 863 in July. The number of unique visitors rose, though, from 367 up to 415. The 415 visitors equals that in May. Is this a matter of just fewer posts? Perhaps. The number of views per posting dropped from 37.5 in June to 36.0 in July; that seems near enough identical. The number of unique visitors per posting rose from 13.1 in June to 17.3 in July, though.

What makes this interesting is these ratios for May. That month had 936 views, 415 visitors, and a scant twelve posts published. That implies 78 views per post, and 34.6 viewers per post. This seems to suggest the best readership-per-effort involvement is not necessarily daily.

The number of Likes received was down, too, from 518 in June to 382 in July. That’s my second-best on record, though. The number of likes per posting dropped from 18.5 to 16.0, which still seems probably about the same. The May ratio was 21.6 likes per posting. The number of comments dropped insignificantly, from 114 in June to 100 in July. The comments-per-posting rose from 4.1 to 4.2, no way a meaningful change. Though, still, in May, with 84 comments and twelve posts, I had a comments-per-posting ratio of 7.

This might suggest I’m best off posting every other day, or maybe even every third day, rather than going for a daily or near-daily schedule.

The greatest number of visitors came as ever from the United States, with 502. Canada sent the next-greatest number, 61 viewers. The United Kingdom came in third at 41. Italy was fourth, at 39 views, and the Philippines 37. I’m glad to have these readers, though I don’t know what’s got me interested in Italy and the Philippines. India sent me 14 viewers, down from June’s 15. Nobody’s listed as being from the European Union, although individual countries within it have a bunch of readers.

Single-reader countries for July were: Albania, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Estonia, Greece, Mexico, Nepal, Norway, Portugal, Serbia, and the United Arab Emirates. Czech Republic is the only country that was also a single-viewer country last month.

The most popular posts over July were, if we can trust WordPress’s statistics:

  1. Reading the Comics, April 20, 2015: History of Mathematics Edition
  2. Reading the Comics, July 4, 2015: Symbolic Curiosities Edition
  3. Reading the Comics, July 24, 2015: All The Popular Topics Are Here Edition
  4. Reading the Comics, July 19, 2015: Rerun Comics Edition
  5. A Summer 2015 Mathematics A To Z: tensor
  6. Lewis Carroll Tries Changing The Way You See Trigonometry
  7. A Summer 2015 Mathematics A To Z: ring

There’s no search term poetry again, alas, although a few things came up. Among them:

  • bloom county 2015 (something I don’t think I ever mentioned, but six people came here looking for it)
  • susan from between friends (Between Friends is one of the comic strips regularly featured around here)
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe.
  • comics strip for sum of difference of two binomials (are there any?)
  • chain rule card sort (not sure what this means, but I’m intrigued)
  • math statistics of the 80s (again, not sure what this means)

I start the month with a total of 26,734 views, and alongside that 1,946 comments. I expect the 2,000th comment to come sometime in August. I’m curious what it’ll be.

And then to remind people to read my blog, in a post on my blog. There’s this “Follow Blog via Email” link that, at least in the P2 Classic theme I’m using right now, is over on the upper right of the page. You can do that. If you have an RSS reader, https://nebusresearch.wordpress.com/feed/ will give you posts. https://nebusresearch.wordpress.com/comments/feed/ will give you comments, although that’s got to be a baffling feed. And my regular old Twitter account is @Nebusj. Thanks for existing and all that.

My Mathematics Blog’s June 2015 Statistics, Unabbreviated


I have my main computer back, happy to say, and now I can fill in the missing parts of my June 2015 statistics report.

As mentioned, June had a record number of views, with 1,051. The number of unique visitors — if WordPress is counting all the visitors — is still down. In April there were 389 visitors and in May 415. June saw only 367 that WordPress sees fit to tell me about. That does imply the views per visitor rose, from April’s 2.69 and May’s 2.26 up to 2.86 in June.

June set a record for likes, though, with 518 recorded. That’s well above the previous record of 296 set in April and the not-bad 259 from May. Comments were at a record high too. WordPress noted 114 comments in June, up from May’s 84 and April’s 64. The previous record had been March’s 93. And it tells me that I have 499 total WordPress followers as of the start of July.

Now to the part from the abbreviated report that people really missed: the listing of the countries. The United States as ever sent me the most readers, 549. Canada came in second, with 91, and the United Kingdom sent 76 readers my way. Italy sent 51 and Austria 30. India sent me 15, way up from May’s two.

My single-reader countries were Czech Republic, El Salvador, the European Union (?), Ireland, Maldives, Namibia, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Pakistan, Romania, Switzerland, Thailand, and Trinidad and Tobago. Romania is on a four-month single-reader streak. Pakistan’s on a two-month streak.

And I’ve read advice that it’s worth reminding people how to follow your blog. Um. There’s this “Follow Blog via Email” link that, at least in the P2 Classic theme I’m using right now, is over on the upper right of the page. You can do that. If you have an RSS reader, https://nebusresearch.wordpress.com/feed/ will give you posts. https://nebusresearch.wordpress.com/comments/feed/ will give you comments, although that’s got to be a baffling feed. And my regular old Twitter account is @Nebusj, which is usually a little more chatty on weeks that don’t involve computer problems. Thanks for existing and all that.

My Mathematics Blog Abbreviated Statistics, June 2015


So, that was a fairly successful month. For June this blog managed a record 1,051 pages viewed. That’s just above April’s high of 1,047, and is a nice rebound from May’s 936. I feel comfortable crediting this mostly to the number of articles I published in the month. Between the Mathematics A To Z and the rush of Reading The Comics posts, and a couple of reblogged or miscellaneous bits, June was my most prolific month: I had 28 articles. If I’d known how busy it was going to be I wouldn’t have skipped the first two Sundays. And i start the month at 25,871 total views.

It’s quite gratifying to get back above 1,000 for more than the obvious reasons. I’ve heard rumors — and I’m not sure where because most of my notes are on my not-yet-returned main computer — that WordPress somehow changed its statistics reporting so that mobile devices aren’t counted. That would explain a sudden drop in both my mathematics and humor blogs, and drops I heard reported from other readership-watching friends. It also implies many more readers out there, which is a happy thought.

Unfortunately because of my computer problems I can’t give reports on things like the number of visitors, or the views per visitor. I can get at WordPress’s old Dashboard statistics page, and that had been showing the number of unique visitors and views per visitor and all that. But on Firefox 3.6.16, and on Safari 5.0.6, this information isn’t displayed. I don’t know if they’ve removed it altogether from the Dashboard Statistics page in the hopes of driving people to their new, awful, statistics page or what. I also can’t find things like the number of likes, because that’s on the New Statistics page, which is inaccessible on browsers this old.

Worse, I can’t find the roster of countries that sent me viewers. I trust that when I get my main computer back, and can look at the horrible new statistics page, I’ll be able to fill that in, but for now — nothing. I’m sorry. I will provide these popular lists when I’m able.

I can say what the most popular posts were in June. As you might expect for a month dominated by the A-To-Z project, the five most popular posts were all Reading The Comics entries:

Finally after that some of the A To Z posts appear, with fallacy, and graph, and n-tuple the most popular of that collection.

Among the search terms bringing people here were:

  • real life problems involving laws of exponents comic strip (three people wanted them!)
  • if the circumference is 40,000,000 then what is the radius (why, one Earth-radius, of course) (approximately)
  • poster on mathematical diagram in the form of cartoon for ,7th class student
  • how to figure out what you need on a final to pass (you need to start sooner in the term)
  • how to count fish (count all the things which are not fish, and subtract that from the total number of all things, and there you go)
  • einstein vs pythagoras formula (do I have to take a side?)
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe.
  • big ben anthropomorphized (it’s not actually Big Ben, you know. The text is clear that it’s Big Ben’s Creature.)
  • wyoming rectangular most dilbert (are we having Zippy the Pinhead fanfiction yet?)

Sorry it’s an abbreviated report. Or, sry is abbrev rept, anyway. I’ll fill in what I can, when I can, and isn’t that true of all of us?

How May 2015 Treated My Mathematics Blog


For May 2015 I tried a new WordPress theme — P2 Classic — and I find I rather like it. Unfortunately it seems to be rubbish on mobile devices and I’m not WordPress Theme-equipped-enough to figure out how to fix that. I’m sorry, mobile readers. I’m honestly curious whether the theme change affected my readership, which was down appreciably over May.

According to WordPress, the number of pages viewed here dropped to 936 in May, down just over ten percent from April’s 1047 and also below March’s 1022. Perhaps the less-mobile-friendly theme was shooing people away. Maybe not, though: in March and April I’d posted 14 articles each, while in May there were a mere twelve. The number of views per post increased steadily, from 73 in March to just under 75 in April to 78 in May. I’m curious if this signifies anything. I may get some better idea next month. June should have at least 13 posts from the Mathematics A To Z gimmick, plus this statistics post, and there’ll surely be at least two Reading The Comics posts, or at least sixteen posts. And who knows what else I’ll feel like throwing in? It’ll be an interesting experiment at least.

Anyway, the number of unique visitors rose to 415 in May, up from April’s 389 but still below March’s 468. The number of views per visitor dropped to 2.26, far below April’s 2.68, but closer in line with March’s 2.18. And 2.26 is close to the normal count for this sort of thing.

The number of likes on posts dropped to 259. In April it was 296 likes and in March 265. That may just reflect the lower number of posts, though. Divide the number of likes by the number of posts and March saw an average of 18.9, April 21.14, and May 21.58. That’s all at least consistent, although there’s not much reason to suppose that only things from the current month were liked.

The number of comments recovered also. May saw 83 comments, up from April’s 64, but not quite back to March’s 93. That comes to, for May, 6.9 comments for each post, but that’s got to be counting links to other posts, including pingbacks and maybe the occasional reblogging. I’ve been getting chattier with folks around here, but not seven comments per post chatty.

June starts at 24,820 views, and 485 people following specifically through WordPress.

I’ve got a healthy number of popular posts the past month; all of these got at least 37 page views each. I cut off at 37 because that’s where the Trapezoids one came in and we already know that’s popular. More popular than that were:

I have the suspicion that comics fans are catching on, quietly, to all this stuff.

Now the countries report. The nations sending me at least twenty page views were the United States (476), the United Kingdom (85), Canada (65), Italy (53), and Austria (20).

Sending just a single reader were Belgium, Bulgaria, Colombia, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Romania, and Vietnam. Romania is on a three-month single-reader streak; Vietnam, two. India sent me a mere two readers, down from six last month. The European Union sent me three.

And among the interesting search terms this past month were:

  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe.
  • how to do a cube box (the cube is easy enough, it’s getting the boxing gloves on that’s hard)
  • popeye “computer king” (Remember that comic?)
  • google can you show me in 1 trapezoid how many cat how many can you make of 2 (?, although I like the way Google is named at the start of the query, like someone on Next Generation summoning the computer)
  • plato “divided line” “arthur cayley” (I believe that mathematics comes in on the lower side of the upper half of Plato’s divided line)
  • where did negative numbers originate from

Someday I must work out that “origin is the gateway” thing.

How April 2015 Treated My Mathematics Blog


(I apologize if the formatting is messed up. For some reason preview is not working, and I will not be trying the new page for entering posts if I can at all help it. I will fix when I can, if it needs fixing.)

As it’s the start of the month I want to try understanding the readership of my blogs, as WordPress gives me statistics. It’s been a more confusing month than usual, though. One thing is easy to say: the number of pages read was 1,047, an all-time high around these parts for a single month. It’s up from 1,022 in March, and 859 in February. And it’s the second month in a row there’ve been more than a thousand readers. That part’s easy.

The number of visitors has dropped. It was down to 389 in April, from a record 468 in March and still-higher 407 in April. This is, if WordPress doesn’t lead me awry, my fifth-highest number of viewers. This does mean the number of views per visitor was my highest since June of 2013. The blog had 2.69 views per visitor, compared to 2.18 in March and 2.11 in February. It’s one of my highest views-per-visitor on record anyway. Perhaps people quite like what they see and are archive-binging. I approve of this. I’m curious why the number of readers dropped so, though, particularly when I look at my humor blog statistics (to be posted later).

I’m confident the readers are there, though. The number of likes on my mathematics blog was 297, up from March’s 265 and February’s 179. It’s the highest on record far as WordPress will tell me. So readers are more engaged, or else they’re clicking like from the WordPress Reader or an RSS feed. Neither gets counted as a page view or a visitor. That’s another easy part. The number of comments is down to 64, from March’s record 93, but March seems to have been an exceptional month. February had 56 comments so I’m not particularly baffled by April’s drop.

May starts out with 23,884 total views, and 472 people following specifically through WordPress.

It’s a truism that my most popular posts are the trapezoids one and the Reading The Comics posts, but for April that was incredibly true. Most popular the past thirty days were:

  1. How Many Trapezoids I Can Draw.
  2. Reading The Comics, April 10, 2015: Getting Into The Story Problem Edition.
  3. Reading The Comics, April 15, 2015: Tax Day Edition.
  4. Reading The Comics, April 20, 2015: History Of Mathematics Edition.
  5. Reading The Comics, March 31, 2015: Closing Out March Edition.

I am relieved that I started giving all these Comics posts their own individual “Edition” titles. Otherwise there’d be no way to tell them apart.

The nations sending me the most readers were, as ever, the United States (662), Canada (82), and the United Kingdom (47), with Slovenia once again strikingly high (36). Hong Kong came in with 24 readers, Italy 23, and Austria a mere 18. Elke Stangl’s had a busy month, I know.

This month’s single-reader countries were Czech Republic, Morocco, the Netherlands, Puerto Rico, Romania, Taiwan, and Vietnam. Romania’s the only one that sent me a single reader last month. India bounced back from five readers to six.

Among the search terms bringing people to me were no poems. Among the interesting phrases were:

  • what point is driving the area difference between two triangles (A good question!)
  • how do you say 1,898,600,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (I almost never do.)
  • is julie larson still drawing the dinette set (Yes, to the best of my knowledge.)
  • jpe fast is earth spinning? (About once per day, although the answer can be surprisingly difficult to say! But also figure about 465 times the cosine of your latitude meters per second, roughly.)
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe. (Again, I don’t know what this means, and I’m a little scared to find out.)
  • i hate maths 2015 photos (Well, that just hurts.)
  • getting old teacher jokes (Again, that hurts, even if it’s not near my birthday.)
  • two trapezoids make a (This could be a poem, actually.)
  • how to draw 2 trapezoids (I’d never thought about that one. Shall have to consider writing it.)

I don’t know quite what it all means, other than that I need to write about comic strips and trapezoids more somehow.

My Mathematics Blog, As March 2015 Would Have It


And now for my monthly review of publication statistics. This is a good month to do it with, since it was a record month: I had 1,022 pages viewed around these parts, the first time (according to WordPress) that I’ve had more than a thousand in a month. In January I’d had 944, and in February a mere 859, which I was willing to blame on the shortness of that month. March’s is a clean record, though, more views per day than either of those months.

The total number of visitors was up, too, to 468. That’s compared to 438 in January and 407 in short February, although it happens it’s not a record; that’s still held by January 2013 and its 473 visitors. The number of views per visitor keeps holding about steady: from 2.16 in January to 2.11 in February to 2.18 in March. It appears that I’m getting a little better at finding people who like to read what I like to write, but haven’t caught that thrilling transition from linear to exponential growth.

The new WordPress statistics tell me I had a record 265 likes in March, up from January’s 196 and February’s 179. The number of comments rose from January’s 51 and February’s 56 to a full 93 for March. I take all this as supporting evidence that I’m better at reaching people lately. (Although I do wonder if it counts backlinks from one of my articles to another as a comment.)

The mathematics blog starts the month at 22,837 total views, and with 454 WordPress followers.

The most popular articles in March, though, were the set you might have guessed without actually reading things around here:

I admit I thought the “how interesting is a basketball tournament?” thing would be more popular, but it’s hampered by having started out in the middle of the month. I might want to start looking at the most popular articles of the past 30 days in the middle of the month too.

The countries sending me the greatest number of readers were the usual set: the United States at 658 in first place, and Canada in second at 66. The United Kingdom was a strong third at 57, and Austria in fourth place at 30.

Sending me a single reader each were Belgium, Ecuador, Israel, Japan, Lebanon, Mexico, Nepal, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Thailand, the United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, and Venezuela. The repeats from February were Japan, Mexico, Romania, and Venezuela. Japan is on a three-month streak, while Mexico has sent me a solitary reader four months in a row. India’s declined slightly in reading me, from 6 to 5. Ah well.

Among the interesting search terms were:

  • right trapezoid 5 (I loved this anime as a kid)
  • a short comic strip on reminding people on how to order decimals correctly (I hope they found what they were looking for)
  • are there other ways to draw a trapezoid (try with food dye on the back of your pet rabbit!)
  • motto of ideal gas (veni vidi v = nRT/P ?)
  • rectangular states (the majority of United States states are pretty rectangular, when you get down to it)
  • what is the definition of rerun (I don’t think this has come up before)
  • what are the chances of consecutive friday the 13th’s in a year (I make it out at 3/28, or a touch under 11 percent; anyone have another opinion?)

Well, with luck, I should have a fresh comic strips post soon and some more writing in the curious mix between information theory and college basketball.

How February 2015 Treated My Mathematics Blog


Of course I’m going to claim February 2015 was a successful month for my mathematics blog here. When have I ever claimed it was a dismal month? Probably I have, though last month wasn’t a case of it.

Anyway, according to WordPress’s statistics page, both the old and the new (which they’re getting around to making less awful), in February the mathematics blog had 859 views, down from January’s 944, but up from December’s 831. This is my second-highest on record. That said, I do want to point out that with a mere 28 days February was at a relative disadvantage for page clicks, and that January saw an average of 30.45 views per day, while February came in at 30.68, which is a record high.

There were 407 visitors in February, down from January’s 438 and December’s 424. 407 is the fourth-highest visitor count I have on record, though its 14.54 visitors per day falls short of January 2015’s 15.64, and way short of the all-time record, January 2013’s 15.26 visitors per day.

The views per visitor were at 1.96 in December, 2.16 in January, and dropped surely insignificantly to 2.11 for February, and there’s no plausibly splitting that up per day. Anyway, the mathematics blog started March at 21,815 views so there’s every reason to hope it’ll hit that wonderfully uniform count of 22,222 views soon.

The new statistics page lets me see that I drew 179 “likes” in February, down from 196 in January, but well up from December’s 128. Not to get too bean-counting but that is 6.39 likes per day in February against a mere 6.32 per day in January.

The most popular posts in February were mostly the comic strip posts, with the perennial favorite of trapezoids sneaking in. Getting more than thirty views each in February were:

  1. Reading the Comics, February 4, 2015: Neutral Edition, where I really showed off the weakness of naming each edition.
  2. Reading the Comics, February 14, 2015: Valentine’s Eve Edition, again, an edition name that’s not really better than just giving the date.
  3. Reading the Comics, January 29, 2015: Returned Motifs Edition, which is the one where I learned anything about the history of blackjack.
  4. How Many Trapezoids I Can Draw, which is the closest I’ll come to classifying the sporadic finite simple groups.
  5. Reading the Comics, February 20, 2015: 19th-Century German Mathematicians Edition, because Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal name-dropped Georg Cantor and Bernard Riemann.
  6. How To Re-Count Fish, describing problems in the post …
  7. How To Count Fish, which was somehow read three fewer times than the Re-Count one was.
  8. Denominated Mischief, in which a bit of arithmetic manipulation proves that 7 equals 11.

In the listing of nations: as ever the countries sending me the most readers were the United States, with a timely 555; Canada with 83, and the United Kingdom with 66. The United States is down from January, but Canada and the United Kingdom strikingly higher. Germany sent 27 (up from 22), Austria 23 (down from 32), and Slovenia came from out of nowhere to send 21 readers this time around. India dropped from 18 to 6.

There were sixteen single-reader countries in February, up from January’s 14: Chile, Czech Republic, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Jamaica, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Swaziland, Sweden, Venezuela, and Vietnam. The repeats from January are Hungary, Japan, and Mexico; Mexico is on a three-month streak.

There weren’t any really good, strange, amusing search terms bringing people here this past month, sad to say. The most evocative of them were:

  • topic about national mathematics day (I think this must be a reference to India’s holiday)
  • price is right piggy bank game (I’ve never studied this one, but I have done bits on the Item Up For Bid and on the Money Game)
  • jokes about algebraic geometry (are there any?)
  • groove spacing 78 and 45 (Yeah, I couldn’t find a definitive answer, but something like 170 grooves per inch seems plausible. Nobody’s taken me up on my Muzak challenge.)
  • two trapezoids make a (well, at least someone’s composing modernist, iconoclastic poetry around here)
  • sketch on how to inscribe more than one in a cycle in a triangle according to g.m green (I think this guy should meet the algebraic geometry jokester)

How My Mathematics Blog Was Read, For January 2015


And after reaching 20,000 views on the final day of December, 2014, could I reach 21,000 views by the end of January? Probably I could have, but in point of fact I did not. I am not complaining, though: I finished the month with 20,956 page views all told, after a record 944 pages got viewed by somebody, somewhere, for some reason. This is a record high for me, going well past the 831 that had been the January 2013 and December 2014 (tied) record. And likely I’ll reach 21,000 in the next couple days anyway.

According to WordPress, this was read by 438 distinct visitors, reading 2.16 views per visitor on average. That isn’t quite a record: January 2013 remains my high count for visitors, at 473, but it’s still, all told, some pretty nice numbers especially considering I don’t think I had my best month of blog-writing. I can’t wait to get some interesting new topics in here for February and see that they interest absolutely nobody.

The new WordPress statistics page is still awful, don’t get me wrong, but it has been getting a little bit better, and it does offer some new data I couldn’t gather easily before. Among them: that in January 205 I received 197 likes overall — a high for the past twelvemonth, which is as far as I can figure out how to get it, and up from 128 in December — and 51 comments, up from December 29, and also a high for the twelvemonth.

The three countries sending me viewers were, once again, the big three of the United States (594), Canada (56), and the United Kingdom (52), with Austria sending in 32 viewers, and Germany and Argentina ending 22 each. And India, for a wonder sent me a noticeable-to-me 18 readers, although on a per capita basis that still isn’t very many, I admit.

There was a bumper crop of single-reader countries, though, up from last month’s six: Belgium, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Hungary, Indonesia, Iraq, Japan, Kuwait, Libya, Mexico, Paraguay, Slovakia, and the United Arab Emirates each found only one person viewing anything around here. Greece and Mexico are repeats from December.

This month’s most popular articles were mostly comic strip posts, although they were a pretty popular set; none of these had fewer than 35 views per, which feels high to me. The top posts of the last 30 days, then, were:

  1. Reading the Comics, January 6, 2015: First of the Year Edition, in which I included drawing a sloppy `2′ as a snoring `Z’ as somehow connected to mathematics.
  2. Reading the Comics, January 24, 2015: Many, But Not Complicated Edition, which includes an explanation for why margins of errors on surveys are always like three or four percent.
  3. Reading the Comics, January 11, 2015: Standard Genres And Bloom County Edition, in which I reveal my best guess for Jon Bon Jovi’s shorts size in the late 80s.
  4. 20,000: My Math Blog’s Statistics, because my narcissism is apparently quite popular?
  5. Reading the Comics, January 17, 2015: Finding Your Place Edition, where, again, I can flog that thing about a watch as a compass.
  6. How Many Trapezoids I Can Draw, which also reveals how many trapeziums I think are different in interesting ways.
  7. A bit more about Thomas Hobbes, and his attempt to redefine the very nature of mathematics, which didn’t succeed in quite the way he wanted.

Among the interesting search terms that brought people here the past month have been ([sic] on all of them):

  • science fiction and trapazoids (Somebody should totally write the definitive SFnal treatment of trapezoids, I agree.)
  • food. stotagre nebus (I feel strangely threatened by this.)
  • a group of student offer at least one of mathematics,physics, and statistcs , 14 of them offer mathematics, 12 offer physics,and 16 offer statistics.7 offer statistics and maths 6 offer maths and physics, 4 offer physics and statistics only, while 5 offer all the three subject (Help?)
  • hiw to draw diffrent trameziums
  • soglow otto radio (Pretty sure I used to listen to that back on WRSU in my undergrad days.)
  • if a calendar has two consecutive months with friday the 13th which would they be (February and March, in a non-bissextile — that is, non-leap — year)
  • how to measure a christmas tree made of triangles and trapeziums (I would use a tape measure, myself)

So if I would summarize January 2015 in my readership here, I would say: tramezium?

20,000: My Math Blog’s Statistics


I reached my 20,000th view around here sometime on the final day of 2014, which is an appealingly tidy coincidence. I’m glad for it. It also gives me a starting point to review the blog’s statistics, as gathered by WordPress, which is trying to move us to a new and perfectly awful statistics page that shows less information more inconveniently.

The total number of page views grew from 625 in October to 674 in November all the way to 831 in December 2014, which just ties my record number of viewers from back in January 2013. The number of unique visitors grew from October’s 323 to November’s 366 up to 424 total, which comes in second-place to January 2013’s 473. I don’t know what I was doing in January 2013 that I’m only gradually getting back up to these days. The number of views per visitor went from 1.93, to 1.84, back up to 1.96, which is probably just a meaningless fluctuation. January 2013 had 1.76.

My most popular articles — with 25 views or more each — were Reading The Comics posts, mostly, with the exceptions being two things almost designed to be clickbait, although I mean them sincerely:

  1. Reading the Comics, December 14, 2014: Pictures Gone Again? Edition, in which I work out one of the calculus-y expressions and find it isn’t all that interesting.
  2. Reading the Comics, December 5, 2014: Good Questions Edition, in which I figured out a Dark Side Of The Horse comic was using a page of symbols from orbital perturbation problems.
  3. Reading the Comics, December 27, 2014: Last of the Year Edition?, which it wasn’t, and which let me talk about how Sally Brown is going to discover rational numbers if Charlie Brown doesn’t over-instruct her.
  4. Reading The Comics, December 22, 2015: National Mathematics Day Edition, which celebrated Srinivasa Ramanujan’s birth by showing a formula that Leonhard Euler discovered, but Euler’s formula is much more comic-strip-readable than any of Ramanujan’s.
  5. What Do I Need To Pass This Class? (December 2014 Edition), which gathered and reposted for general accessibility the formula and the charts so people can figure out what the subject line says. Also what you need to get a B, or A, or any other desired grade. (Mostly, you needed to start caring about your grade earlier.)
  6. How Many Trapezoids I Can Draw, my life’s crowning achievement. (Six. If you find a seventh please let me know and I’ll do a follow-up post.)

The country sending me the most readers was, as ever, Bangladesh with 535 viewers. Well, two viewers, but it’s boring just listing the United States up front every time. The United Kingdom (37) and Canada (33) came up next, then Argentina (17), which surprises me every month by having a healthy number of readers there, Australia (12), Austria (11), and the Netherlands (10), proving that people in countries that don’t start with ‘A’ can still kind of like me too. The single-reader countries this month were the Czech Republic, Greece, Macedonia, Mexico, Romania, and South Africa. That’s far fewer than last month; of November’s 17 single-reader countries only Romania is a repeat.

Among search terms that brought people here were popeye comic computer king — I don’t know just how that’s going to end up either, folks, but I’m guessing “not that satisfyingly”, since Bud Sagendorf was fond of shaggy-dog non-endings to tales — and which reindeer was in arthur christmas (they were descendants of the “Original” canonical eight, though Grand-Santa forgets some of the names), daily press, “the dinette set” answer for december 11, 2014, and solution to the comic puzzle, “the dinette set”. in the daily press, december 12, 2014, and answer to the comic puzzle, “the dinette set”. in the daily press, december 12, 2014, which suggests maybe I should ditch the pop-math racket and just get into explaining The Dinette Set, which is admittedly kind of a complicated panel strip. There’s multiple riffs around the central joke in each panel, but if you don’t get the main joke then the riffs look like they’re part of the main joke, and they aren’t, so the whole thing becomes confusing. And the artist includes a “Find-It” bit in every panel, usually hiding something like a triangle or a star or something in the craggly details of the art and that can be hard to find. Mostly, though, the joke is: these people are genially and obliviously obnoxious people who you might love but you’d still find annoying. That’s it, nearly every panel. I hope that helps.

Advanced November 2014 Statistics


So that little bit I added in my last statistics post, tracking how many days went between the first and the last reading of an article according to WordPress’s figures? I was curious, and went through my posts from mid-October through mid-November to see how long the readership lifespan of an average post was. I figured stuff after mid-November may not have quite had long enough for people to gradually be done with it.

I’d expected the typical post to have what’s called a Poisson distribution, in number of page views per day, with a major peak in the first couple days after it’s published and then, maybe, a long stretch of exceedingly minor popularity. I think that’s what’s happening, although the problem of small numbers means it’s a pretty spotty pattern. Also confounding things is that a post can sometimes get a flurry of publicity long after its main lifespan has passed. So I decided to count both how long each post had between its first and last-viewed days, and also the “first span”, how many days it was until the first day without page views, to use as proxy for separating out late revivals.

Post Days Read First Span
How To Numerically Integrate Like A Mathematician 45 8
Reading the Comics, October 14, 2014: Not Talking About Fourier Transforms Edition 25 7
How Richard Feynman Got From The Square Root of 2 to e 41 4
Reading The Comics, October 20, 2014: No Images This Edition 5 5
Calculus without limits 5: log and exp 25 3
Reading the Comics, October 25, 2014: No Images Again Edition 28 2
How To Hear Drums 14 6
My Math Blog Statistics, October 2014 30 4
Reading The Comics, November 4, 2014: Will Pictures Ever Reappear Edition 9 6
Echoing “Fourier Echoes Euler” 12 5
Some Stuff About Edmond Halley 11 2
Reading The Comics, November 9, 2014: Finally, A Picture Edition 11 4
About An Inscribed Circle 13 5
Reading The Comics, November 14, 2014: Rectangular States Edition 15 1
Radius of the inscribed circle of a right angled triangle 12 5

For what it’s worth, the mean lifespan of a post is 19.7 days, with standard deviation of 12.0 days. The mean lifespan of the first flush of popularity is 4.5 days, with a standard deviation of 1.9 days.

I suspect the thing that brings out these late rushes of popularity are things like the monthly roundup posts, which send people back to articles whose lifespans had expired weeks before; or when there’s a running thread as in the circle-inscribed-in-a-triangle theme that encourages people to go back again and again. And I’m curious how long articles would last without this sort of threading between them.

June 2014 In Mathematics Blogging


And with the start of July I look over how well the mathematics blog did in June and see what I can learn from that. It seems more people are willing to read when I post stuff, which is worth knowing, I guess. After May’s near-record of 751 views and 315 visitors I expected a fall, and, yeah, it came. The number of pages viewed dropped to 492, which is … well, the fourth-highest this year at least? And the number of unique visitors fell to 194, which is actually the lowest of this year. The silver lining is this means the views per visitor, 2.54, was the second-highest since WordPress started sharing those statistics with me, so, people who come around find themselves interested. I start the month at 16,174 views total and won’t cross 17,000 at that rate come July, but we’ll see what I can do. And between WordPress and Twitter I’m (as of this writing) at exactly 400 followers, which isn’t worldshaking but is a nice big round number. I admit thinking how cool it would be if that were 400 million but I’d probably get stage fright if it were.

If one thing defined June it was “good grief but there’s a lot of mathematics comics”, which I attributed to Comic Strip Master Command ordering cartoonists to clear the subject out before summer vacation. It does mean the top five posts for June are almost comically lopsided, though:

Now, that really is something neat about triangles in the post linked above so please do read it. What I’m not clear about is why the June 16th comics post was so extremely popular; it’s nearly twice as viewed as the runner-up. If I were sure what keyword is making it so popular I’d do more with that.

Now on to the international portion of this contest: what countries are sending me the most visitors? Of course the United States comes in first, at 336 views. Denmark finished second with 17, and there was a three-way tie for third as Australia, Austria, and the United Kingdom sent sixteen each. (Singapore and Canada came in next with nine each.) I had a pretty nice crop of single-reader countries this month: Argentina, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Egypt, Ghana, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Paraguay, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland, and Thailand. Hong Kong, Japan, and Switzerland are repeats from last month and nobody’s got a three-month streak going.

Among the interesting search terms to bring people to me:

  • names for big numbers octillion [ happy to help? ]
  • everything to need to know about trapezoids [ I’m going to be the world’s authority on trapezoids! ]
  • what does the fact that two trapezoids make a parallelogram say about tth midline [ I have some ideas but don’t want to commit to anything particular ]
  • latching onto you 80 version [ I … think I’m being asked for lyrics? ]
  • planet nebus [ I feel vaguely snarked upon, somehow ]
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe [ … thank you? ]
  • nebus student job for uae [ Um … I guess I can figure out a consulting fee or something if you ask? ]

The Math Blog Statistics, May 2014


And on to the tracking of how my little mathematics blog is doing. As readership goes, things are looking good — my highest number of page views since January 2013, and third-highest ever, and also my highest number of unique viewers since January 2013 (unique viewer counts aren’t provided for before December 2012, so who knows what happened before that). The total number of page views rose from 565 in April to 751, and the number of unique visitors rose from 238 to 315. This is a remarkably steady number of views per visitor, though — 2.37 rising to 2.38, as if that were a significant difference. I passed visitor number 15,000 somewhere around the 5th of May, and at number 15,682 right now that puts me on track to hit 16,000 somewhere around the 13th.

As with April, the blog’s felt pretty good to me. I think I’m hitting a pretty good mixture of writing about stuff that interest me and finding readers who’re interested to read it. I’m hoping I can keep that up another month.

The most popular articles of the month — well, I suspect someone was archive-binging on the mathematics comics ones because, here goes:

  1. How Many Trapezoids I Can Draw, which will be my memorial
  2. Reading the Comics, May 13, 2014: Good Class Problems Edition, which was a tiny bit more popular than …
  3. Reading the Comics, May 26, 2014: Definitions Edition, the last big entry in the Math Comics of May sequence.
  4. Some Things About Joseph Nebus is just my little biographic page and I have no idea why anyone’s even looking at that.
  5. Reading the Comics, May 18, 2014: Pop Math of the 80s Edition is back on the mathematics comics, as these things should be,
  6. Reading the Comics, May 4, 2014: Summing the Series Edition and what the heck, let’s just mention this one too.
  7. The ideal gas equation is my headsup to a good writer’s writings.
  8. Where Does A Plane Touch A Sphere? is a nicely popular bit motivated by the realization that a tangent point is an important calculus concept and nevertheless a subtler thing than one might realize.

I think without actually checking this is the first month I’ve noticed with seven countries sending me twenty or more visitors each — the United States (438), Canada (39), Australia (38), Sweden (31), Denmark (21), and Singapore and the United Kingdom (20 each). Austria came in at 19, too. Sixteen countries sent me one visitor each: Antigua and Barbuda, Colombia, Guernsey, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Mexico, Morocco, Norway, Peru, Poland, Swaziland, and Switzerland. Morocco’s the only one to have been there last month.

And while I lack for search term poetry, some of the interesting searches that brought people here include:

  • working mathematically comics
  • https://nebusresearch.wordpress.com/ [ They’ve come to the right place, then. ]
  • how do you say 1898600000000000000000000000 in words [ I never do. ]
  • two trapezoids make a [ This is kind of beautiful as it is. ]
  • when you take a trapeziod apart how many trangles will you have?
  • -7/11,5/-8which is greter rational number and why
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe. [ This again is rather beautiful. ]
  • venn diagram on cartoons and amusement parks [ Beats me. ]