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  • Joseph Nebus 6:00 pm on Thursday, 12 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , December, , , Twitter,   

    How December 2016 Treated My Mathematics Blog 


    I’m getting back to normal. And getting to suspect WordPress just isn’t sending out “Fireworks” reports on how the year for my blog went. Fine then; I’ll carry on. Going back to the Official WordPress statistics page and sharing it for whatever value that has we find that … apparently I just held November 2016 all over again. Gads what a prospect.

    As ever I exaggerate, and as ever, not by much. There were 956 page views from 589 distinct readers in December. In November there were 923 page views from 575 distinct readers. There were 21 posts in December, compared to 21 posts in November. Both are up from October, 907 page views from 536 visitors, although that was a nice and easy month with only 13 posts published. I’m a little disappointed to fall under a thousand page views for four months running, but, like, I tried posting stuff more often. What else can I do, besides answer comments the same year they’re posted and chat with people on their blogs? You know?

    There were 136 pages liked in December, down from November’s 157 and up from October’s 115. Comments were down to 29 from November’s 35, and while that’s up from October’s 24 I should point out some of January’s comments are really me answering December comments. I had a lot of things slurping up time and energy. That doesn’t mean I’m not going to count the comments I wrote in January as anything other than January’s comments, though.

    According to Insights, my most popular day for reading is Sunday, with 17 percent of page views coming then. I expected that; Sunday’s been the most popular day the last few months. It’s only slightly most popular, though. 17 percent (18 percent last month) is about what you’d expect for people reading here without any regard for the day of the week. 6 pm was the most popular hour, barely, with 9 percent of page views then. That’s the hour I’ve settled on for posting stuff. But that hour’s down from being 14 percent of page views in November. I don’t know what that signifies.

    My roster of countries and the page views from them looks like this. I’m curiously delighted that India’s becoming a regular top-five country.

    Country Views
    United States 587
    United Kingdom 61
    India 47
    Canada 44
    Germany 25
    Austria 22
    Slovenia 15
    Philippines 13
    Netherlands 10
    Spain 9
    Australia 9
    Italy 7
    Puerto Rico 7
    Finland 6
    Norway 6
    Singapore 6
    France 5
    Ireland 5
    Switzerland 5
    Indonesia 4
    Sweden 4
    Thailand 4
    Bahrain 3
    Barbados 3
    Estonia 3
    Israel 3
    Turkey 3
    Chile 2
    Greece 2
    New Zealand 2
    Nigeria 2
    Peru 2
    Poland 2
    Sri Lanka 2
    United Arab Emirates 2
    Bangladesh 1
    Belgium 1
    Denmark 1 (*)
    Egypt 1
    European Union 1
    Japan 1 (**)
    Kuwait 1
    Lebanon 1
    Luxembourg 1
    Nepal 1
    Pakistan 1
    Romania 1
    Saudi Arabia 1 (**)
    Slovakia 1
    South Africa 1 (**)

    There’s 50 countries altogether that sent me viewers, if we take “European Union” as a country. That’s up from November’s 46. There were 15 single-view countries, the same as in November. Denmark was a single-view country last month. Japan, Saudia Arabia, and South Africa are on three-month single-view streaks. “European Union” is back after a brief absence.

    For the second month in a row none of my most popular posts were Reading the Comics essays. They instead were split between the A To Z, some useful-mathematics stuff, and some idle trivia. The most popular stuff in December here was:

    There weren’t many specific search terms; most were just “unknown”. Of the search terms that could be known I got this bunch that started out normal enough and then got weird.

    • comics strip of production function
    • comics of production function theory
    • comics about compound event in math
    • comics trip math probability
    • example of probability comics trip
    • population of charlotte nc 1975
    • a to z image 2017
    • mathematics dark secrets

    I, um, maybe have an idea what that last one ought to find.

    January starts with my mathematics blog having gotten 44,104 page views total from 18,889 distinct known visitors. That’s still a little page view lead on my humor blog, but that’s going to be lost by the start of February. My humor blog’s been more popular consistently the several months, and the humor blog got some little wave of popularity the past couple days. Why should it have had that? My best guess: I’m able to use that platform to explain what’s going on in Judge Parker, which I can’t quite justify here. Maybe next month.

    If you’d like to follow my mathematics blog, please, click the buttons in the upper-right corner of the page to follow the blog on WordPress or by e-mail. You can also find me on Twitter as @nebusj where I try not to be one of those people who somehow has fifty tweets or retweets every hour of the day. But I haven’t done any livetweeting of a bad cartoon in ages. Might change.

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    • mathtuition88 8:04 am on Friday, 13 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Nice number of United States views!

      Like

      • Joseph Nebus 3:18 pm on Saturday, 21 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you. I’m always surprised by how the numbers concentrate in a particular region. I’d naively expect to be about equally read anywhere in the English-speaking world, although perhaps my heavy focus on United States-syndicated comic strips does something to attract more United States readers and shoo off non-US-audiences. It’s a curious effect, anyway.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mathtuition88 3:29 pm on Saturday, 21 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          I have a similar case, most of my viewership (90% in fact) is from Singapore even though 70%-80% of my content should be considered country-neutral.

          Like

          • Joseph Nebus 3:48 pm on Saturday, 21 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply

            Yeah, the country links are weird. I would understand time-zone-based links; something that appears at 3 am local time is not going to be read nearly as much as the same thing at 3 pm. So with most of my mathematics posts here appearing in late-morning/early-afternoon United States time, and early-evening European time, I would expect more chances for readers there. But that there seem to be correlations across national boundaries even for places that haven’t got time zone differences is weird: why not as many Hong Kong readers as Singaporean ones? Or shouldn’t India’s large English-reading audience balance out a couple hours’ difference in time zone? Something I don’t understand is going on here.

            Liked by 1 person

            • mathtuition88 3:54 pm on Saturday, 21 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply

              Have you tried Google Webmasters? There is a way to set your website’s target location (they call it geotargeting). It didn’t work much for me, but it is worth a try.

              Like

              • Joseph Nebus 5:21 am on Saturday, 28 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply

                I have not! I haven’t even thought about it, actually, but it’s worth at least investigating. I suppose that insofar as I have a location the United States is fair enough; my comic strip posts are irredeemably America-centric. But I’d like other people to feel welcome around here.

                Liked by 1 person

    • elkement (Elke Stangl) 10:37 am on Sunday, 15 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      It would be interesting to see statistics for a large number of WordPress.com blog and about how views have been changed over recent years. More and more blogs are started, but on the other hand the life time of most blogs seems to be alive only for about 1-2 years. Recently somebody ‘from the past’ commented on my blog: He came back to his abandoned blog after a few years and found that I was the only blogger ‘still alive’ from the crowd he once followed.

      I think views are not increased significantly if you blog more. E.g. in the last year I had about 1400 views per month – despite I blog only twice a month. Most of the views are generated by a small set of posts, some of them as old as 2012. In 2014 I blogged more than twice as much and had about 30% more views. But this included some pronounced spikes which I attributed to bot-like behavior as the clicks over time were so regular. WordPress support could not confirm this but could not refute it either.
      It somehow feels as if an ‘established’ blog is given a certain share of internet attention, and it will not change no matter what you do :-)

      Do you see some long-term trend in views per year? Does it correlate with posts per year?

      Liked by 1 person

      • elkement (Elke Stangl) 10:39 am on Sunday, 15 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        (… and I wished there would be an editor… ‘ the life time of most blogs seems to be alive’ … one time would have been enough… I guess you know that I mean ;-))

        Liked by 1 person

        • Joseph Nebus 3:29 pm on Saturday, 21 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          Oh, yes, understood easily. … It is a little surprising there’s not at least the chance to edit the first five minutes after posting something.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Joseph Nebus 3:27 pm on Saturday, 21 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I admit a part of my posting these numbers is that I’m curious what other people’s readership patterns are like. I’m shameless and happy to admit my actual exact numbers as best as I can know them. But I’d like to know about overall trends. After all, it was only by comparing numbers that we worked out there seems to have been some strange drop like a year and a half ago that we think reflected mobile-device numbers no longer being counted.

        The expiration of older blogs is another of those strange phenomena. I mean some free weekend to go through my blog and cut out sites that haven’t updated in, like, two years. But why I should do that I don’t know; if they aren’t posting it isn’t as though they’re crowding out space. Just some sense that my readership list ought to be faintly in touch with what’s current.

        I’ve got a few perennial posts. The count of how many grooves are on a record’s side (or, really, how many times the groove intersects a radial line on a record). How to figure what you need on the final. The Arthur Christmas series. The latter two I try to promote at appropriate times, though. Past that it’s usually my comic strip posts that get readers, I suppose because people like to look up when curious mathematics stuff appears in Luann and they wonder if that makes any sense.

        Now, my long-term, year-long trends … I’m not sure. I have got five full years (wow) of numbers to work with so I can make something that looks faintly like a linear regression study. Might do that and see if there’s any correlation with post count.

        Liked by 2 people

      • mathtuition88 3:51 pm on Saturday, 21 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        That is true. For my blog 10% of the posts generate 90% of the views. And unfortunately those 10% are probably the least mathematical of the posts (for instance discussion/information of the Singapore education system). Pareto principle holds true.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Joseph Nebus 5:16 am on Saturday, 28 January, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          You know, discussions of what are the popular versus the most-worked-on versus the most common posts people have reminds me of something from Walt Kelly’s masterpiece comic strip Pogo. The irascible Porky Pine warned, I think, Pogo, “If the public decides it’s gonna honor you they ain’t gonna let your feelings get in the way.”

          Liked by 1 person

  • Joseph Nebus 6:00 pm on Tuesday, 6 December, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Twitter,   

    How November 2016 Treated My Mathematics Blog 


    I didn’t forget about reviewing my last month’s readership statistics. I just ran short on time to gather and publish results is all. But now there’s an hour or so free to review that WordPress says my readership was like in November and I can see what was going on.

    Well.

    So, that was a bit disappointing. The start of an A To Z Glossary usually sees a pretty good bump in my readership. The steady publishing of a diverse set of articles usually helps. My busiest months have always been ones with an A To Z series going on. This November, though, there were 923 page views around here, from 575 distinct visitors. That’s up from October, with 907 page views and 536 distinct visitors. But it’s the same as September’s 922 page views from 575 distinct visitors. I blame the US presidential election. I don’t think it’s just that everyone I can still speak to was depressed by it. My weekly readership the two weeks after the election were about three-quarters that of the week before or the last two weeks of November. I’d be curious what other people saw. My humor blog didn’t see as severe a crash the week of the 14th, though.

    Well, the people who were around liked what they saw. There were 157 pages liked in November, up from 115 in September and October. That’s lower than what June and July, with Theorem Thursdays posts, had, and below what the A To Z in March and April drew. But it’s up still. Comments were similarly up, to 35 in November from October’s 24 and September’s 20. That’s up to around what Theorem Thursdays attracted.

    December starts with my mathematics blog having had 43,145 page views from a reported 18,022 distinct viewers. And it had 636 WordPress.com followers. You can be among them by clicking the “Follow” button on the upper right corner. It’s up from the 626 WordPress.com followers I had at the start of November. That’s not too bad, considering.

    I had a couple of perennial favorites among the most popular articles in November:

    This is the first time I can remember that a Reading The Comics post didn’t make the top five.

    Sundays are the most popular days for reading posts here. 18 percent of page views come that day. I suppose that’s because I have settled on Sunday as a day to reliably post Reading the Comics essays. The most popular hour is 6 pm, which drew 11 percent of page views. In October Sundays were the most popular day, with 18 percent of page views. 6 pm as the most popular hour, but then it drew 14 percent of page views. Same as September. I don’t know why 6 pm is so special.

    As ever there wasn’t any search term poetry. But there were some good searches, including:

    • how many different ways can you draw a trapizium
    • comics back ground of the big bang nucleosynthesis
    • why cramer’s rule sucks (well, it kinda does)
    • oliver twist comic strip digarm
    • work standard approach sample comics
    • what is big bang nucleusynthesis comics strip

    I don’t understand the Oliver Twist or the nucleosynthesis stuff.

    And now the roster of countries and their readership, which for some reason is always popular:

    Country Page Views
    United States 534
    United Kingdom 78
    India 36
    Canada 33
    Philippines 22
    Germany 21
    Austria 18
    Puerto Rico 17
    Slovenia 14
    Singapore 13
    France 12
    Sweden 8
    Spain 8
    New Zealand 7
    Australia 6
    Israel 6
    Pakistan 5
    Hong Kong SAR China 4
    Portugal 4
    Belgium 3
    Colombia 3
    Netherlands 3
    Norway 3
    Serbia 3
    Thailand 3
    Brazil 2
    Croatia 2
    Finland 2
    Malaysia 2
    Poland 2
    Switzerland 2
    Argentina 1
    Bulgaria 1
    Cameroon 1
    Cyprus 1
    Czech Republic 1 (***)
    Denmark 1
    Japan 1 (*)
    Lithuania 1
    Macedonia 1
    Mexico 1 (*)
    Russia 1
    Saudi Arabia 1 (*)
    South Africa 1 (*)
    United Arab Emirates 1 (*)
    Vietnam 1

    That’s 46 countries, the same as last month. 15 of them were single-reader countries; there were 20 single-reader countries in October. Japan, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, and the United Arab Emirates have been single-reader countries for two months running. Czech has been one for four months.

    Always happy to see Singapore reading me (I taught there for several years). The “European Union” listing seems to have vanished, here and on my humor blog. I’m sure that doesn’t signal anything ominous at all.

     
  • Joseph Nebus 6:00 pm on Saturday, 5 November, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , October, , , Twitter,   

    How October 2016 Treated My Mathematics Blog 


    I do try to get these monthly readership review posts done close to the start of the month. I was busy the 1st of the month, though, and had to fit around the End 2016 Mathematics A To Z. And then I meant to set this to post on Thursday, since I didn’t have anything else going that day, and forgot.

    Readership Numbers:

    The number of page views declined again in October, part of a trend that’s been steady since June. There were only 907 views, down a slight amount from September’s 922 or more significantly from August’s 1002. I’ll find my way back above a thousand in a month if I can. A To Z months are usually pretty good ones, possibly because of all the fresh posts reminding people I exist.

    The number of unique visitors dropped to 536. There had been 576 in September, but then there were only 531 unique visitors in August, if you believe that sort of thing. The number of likes was 115, exactly the same as in September and slightly up from August’s 107. The number of comments rose to 24, up from September’s 20 and August’s 16. That’s certainly been helped by people making requests for the End 2016 Mathematics A To Z. But that counts too.

    Popular Posts:

    The most popular post of the month was a surprise to me and dates back to September of 2012, incredibly. I suspect someone on a popular web site linked to it and I never suspected. And the Reading the Comics posts were popular as ever.

    I’ve been trying to limit these most-popular posts to just five pieces. But How Mathematical Physics Works was the next piece to make the top ten and I am proud of it, so there.

    Listing Countries:

    Where did my readers come from in October? All over, but mostly, from 46 particular countries. Here’s the oddly popular list of them:

    Country Readers
    United States 466
    United Kingdom 78
    Philippines 55
    India 52
    Canada 32
    Germany 27
    Austria 23
    Puerto Rico 19
    Australia 14
    France 12
    Slovenia 10
    Spain 9
    Brazil 7
    Netherlands 7
    Italy 6
    New Zealand 5
    Singapore 5
    Denmark 4
    Sweden 4
    Bulgaria 3
    Poland 3
    Serbia 3
    Argentina 2
    European Union 2
    Indonesia 2
    Norway 2
    Bahamas 1
    Belgium 1
    Czech Republic 1 (**)
    Estonia 1 (*)
    Finland 1
    Greece 1
    Ireland 1
    Israel 1
    Jamaica 1
    Japan 1
    Mexico 1
    Portugal 1 (*)
    Russia 1
    Saudi Arabia 1
    Slovakia 1
    South Africa 1
    Ukraine 1
    United Arab Emirates 1
    Uruguay 1
    Zambia 1

    Estonia and Portugal are on two-month streaks as single-read countries. The Czech Republic’s on a three-month streak so. Nobody’s on a four-month streak, not yet.

    Search Term Non-Poetry:

    Once again it wasn’t a truly poetic sort of month. But it was one that taught me what people are looking for, and it’s comics about James Clerk Maxwell. Look at these queries:

    • comic strips of the scientist maxwell
    • comics trip of james clerk maxwell
    • comics about maxwell the scientist
    • james clerk maxwell comics trip
    • log 10 times 10 to the derivative of 10000
    • problems with vinyl lp with too many grooves
    • comics about integers
    • comic strip in advance algebra

    I admit I don’t know why someone sees James Clerk Maxwell as a figure for a comics trip. He’s famous for the laws of electromagnetism, of course. Also for great work in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Also for color photography. And explaining how the rings of Saturn could work. And for working out the physics of truss bridges, which may sound boring but is important. Great subject for a biography. Just, a comic?

    Counting Readers:

    November sees the blog start with 42,250 page views, from 17,747 unique visitors if you can believe that. I’m surprised the mathematics blog still has a higher view count than my humor blog has, just now. That one’s consistently more popular; this one’s just been around longer.

    WordPress says I started November with 626 followers, barely up from October’s 624. If you have wanted to follow me, there’s a button on the upper-right corner of the blog for that, at least until I change to a different theme. Also if you know a WordPress theme that would work better for the kind of blog I write let me know. I have a vague itch to change things around and that always precedes trouble. Also you can follow me on Twitter, @Nebusj, or check that out to make sure I’m not one of those people who somehow is hard to Twitter-read.

    According to the “Insights” tab my readership’s largest on Sundays, which makes sense. I’ve standardized on Sundays for the Reading the Comics essays. That gets 18 percent of page views, slightly more than one in seven views. The most popular hour is again 6 pm, I assume Universal Time. 14 percent of page views come in that hour. That’s the same percentage as last month and it must reflect when my standard posting hour is.

     
    • davekingsbury 10:52 pm on Sunday, 6 November, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Perhaps your wide readership shows that mathematics is a universal language?

      Like

      • Joseph Nebus 5:56 am on Wednesday, 9 November, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Conceivable! Although I suppose I’ve probably hit on a couple of topics that people are perennially if slightly looking for. And I have the advantage of writing in English, which so much of the Internet still depends upon. (I suppose it can’t hurt I’ve been trying to write sentences easier to understand, which is good for all readers as long as I don’t get simpler than the idea I mean to express.)

        Like

    • davekingsbury 5:03 pm on Wednesday, 9 November, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Popularising maths and the sciences is a valuable art – long may you continue!

      Like

  • Joseph Nebus 6:00 pm on Wednesday, 17 August, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , sheep, Twitter, Utopia, ,   

    Some Mathematical Tweets To Read 


    Can’t deny that I will sometimes stockpile links of mathematics stuff to talk about. Sometimes I even remember to post it. Sometimes it’s a tweet like this, which apparently I’ve been carrying around since April:

    I admit I do not know whether the claim is true. It’s plausible enough. English has many variants in England alone, and any trade will pick up its own specialized jargon. The words are fun as it is.

    From the American Mathematical Society there’s this:

    I talk a good bit about knot theory. It captures the imagination and it’s good for people who like to doodle. And it has a lot of real-world applications. Tangled wires, protein strands, high-energy plasmas, they all have knots in them. Some work by Paul Sutcliffe and Fabian Maucher, both of Durham University, studies tangled vortices. These are vortices that are, er, tangled together, just like you imagine. Knot theory tells us much about this kind of vortex. And it turns out these tangled vortices can untangle themselves and smooth out again, even without something to break them up and rebuild them. It gives hope for power cords everywhere.

    Nerds have a streak which compels them to make blueprints of things. It can be part of the healthier side of nerd culture, the one that celebrates everything. The side that tries to fill in the real-world things that the thing-celebrated would have if it existed. So here’s a bit of news about doing that:

    I like the attempt to map Sir Thomas More’s Utopia. It’s a fun exercise in matching stuff to a thin set of data. But as mentioned in the article, nobody should take it too seriously. The exact arrangement of things in Utopia isn’t the point of the book. More probably didn’t have a map for it himself.

    (Although maybe. I believe I got this from Simon Garfield’s On The Map: A Mind-Expanding Exploration Of The Way The World Looks and apologize generally if I’ve got it wrong. My understanding is Robert Louis Stevenson drew a map of Treasure Island and used it to make sure references in the book were consistent. Then the map was lost in the mail to his publishers. He had to read his text and re-create it as best he could. Which, if true, makes the map all the better. It makes it so good a lost-map story that I start instinctively to doubt it; it’s so colorfully perfect, after all.)

    And finally there’s this gem from the Magic Realism Bot:

    Happy reading.

     
  • Joseph Nebus 3:00 pm on Wednesday, 10 February, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Twitter   

    Proportional Dice 


    So, here’s a nice probability problem that recently made it to my Twitter friends page:

    (By the way, I’m @Nebusj on Twitter. I’m happy to pick up new conversational partners even if I never quite feel right starting to chat with someone.)

    Schmidt does assume normal, ordinary, six-sided dice for this. You can work out the problem for four- or eight- or twenty- or whatever-sided dice, with most likely a different answer.

    But given that, the problem hasn’t quite got an answer right away. Reasonable people could disagree about what it means to say “if you roll a die four times, what is the probability you create a correct proportion?” For example, do you have to put the die result in a particular order? Or can you take the four numbers you get and arrange them any way at all? This is important. If you have the numbers 1, 4, 2, and 2, then obviously 1/4 = 2/2 is false. But rearrange them to 1/2 = 2/4 and you have something true.

    We can reason this out. We can work out how many ways there are to throw a die four times, and so how many different outcomes there are. Then we count the number of outcomes that give us a valid proportion. That count divided by the number of possible outcomes is the probability of a successful outcome. It’s getting a correct count of the desired outcomes that’s tricky.

     
    • Thumbup 3:09 pm on Wednesday, 10 February, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Like

    • howardat58 3:14 pm on Wednesday, 10 February, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Vegetarians clearly have different definitions.

      Like

      • Joseph Nebus 3:47 am on Tuesday, 16 February, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Well, we have to be a bit more careful than average, is all. There’s troublesome stuff where you’d never expect it.

        Like

    • Chiaroscuro 4:00 pm on Wednesday, 10 February, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      So, let’s make these A/B=C/D for the dice, assuming in-order rolls. 1296 possibilities.

      If A=C and B=D, it’ll always work. So that’s 36.

      Additionally: If A=B and C=D, it’ll always work (1=1). So that’s 36,. minus the 6 where A=B=C=D.

      Then 1/2=2/4 (and converse and inverse and both), 1/2=3/6 (same), 2/4=3/6 (same), 1/3=2/6 (same). 4, 4, 4, 4.so 16 total.

      36+30+16=82, unless I’ve missed some. 82/1296, which reduces to 41/648.

      Like

      • Chiaroscuro 4:02 pm on Wednesday, 10 February, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Ooh! I missed 2/3=4/6. (and converse, and inverse, and both). So another 4, meaning 86/1296.

        Like

        • Joseph Nebus 3:51 am on Tuesday, 16 February, 2016 Permalink | Reply

          There you go. For what it’s worth, I make out the same count of in-order rolls. And a little program I wrote to count them comes up with 86 as well.

          Rolls where order doesn’t matter, and you can rearrange the dice to find a pattern that fits … well, obviously there’s more of them.

          Like

  • Joseph Nebus 8:09 pm on Friday, 25 April, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Twitter   

    Some Facts For The Day 


    I’d just wanted to note the creation of another fact-of-the-day Twitter feed from the indefatigable John D Cook. This one is dubbed Unit Facts, and it’s aiming at providing information about where various units of measure come from. The first few days have begun with, naturally enough, the base units of the Metric System (can you name all seven?), and has stretched out already to things like what a knot is, how picas and inches are related, and what are ems and fortnights besides useful to know for crossword puzzles, or how something might be measured, as in the marshmallow tweet above.

    Cook offers a number of interesting fact-of-the-day style feeds, which I believe are all linked to one another through their “Following” pages. These include algebra, topology, probability, and analysis facts of the day, as well as Unix tool tips, RegExp and TeX/LaTeX trivia, symbols (including a lot of Unicode and HTML entities), and the like. If you’re of the sort to get interested in neatly delivered bits of science- and math- and computer-related trivia, well, good luck with your imminent archive-binge.

     
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