Reading the Comics, April 1, 2021: Why Is Gunther Taking Algebraic Topology Edition


I’m not yet looking to discuss every comic strip with any mathematics mention. But something gnawed at me in this installment of Greg Evans and Karen Evans’s Luann. It’s about the classes Gunther says he’s taking.

The main characters in Luann are in that vaguely-defined early-adult era. They’re almost all attending a local university. They’re at least sophomores, since they haven’t been doing stories about the trauma and liberation of going off to school. How far they’ve gotten has been completely undefined. So here’s what gets me.

Gunther, looking at sewing patterns: 'You want me to sew pirate outfits?' Bets: 'I'm thinking satin brocade doublet and velvet pantaloons.' Les, not in the conversation: 'Nerd.' Gunther: 'I'm thinking algebraic topology and vector calculus homework.' (He shows his textbooks.) Les: 'And nerdier. (Les pets a cat.)
Greg Evans and Karen Evans’s Luann for the 1st of April, 2021. This and other essays discussing topics raised by Luann are at this link. The overall story here is that Bets wants to have this pirate-themed dinner and trusts Gunther, who’s rather good at clothes-making, to do the decorating.

Gunther taking vector calculus? That makes sense. Vector calculus is a standard course if you’re taking any mathematics-dependent major. It might be listed as Multivariable Calculus or Advanced Calculus or Calculus III. It’s where you learn partial derivatives, integrals along a path, integrals over a surface or volume. I don’t know Gunther’s major, but if it’s any kind of science, yeah, he’s taking vector calculus.

Algebraic topology, though. That I don’t get. Topology at all is usually an upper-level course. It’s for mathematics majors, maybe physics majors.  Not every mathematics major takes topology.   Algebraic topology is a deeper specialization of the subject. I’ve only seen courses listed as algebraic topology as graduate courses. It’s possible for an undergraduate to take a graduate-level course, yes. And it may be that Gunther is taking a regular topology course, and the instructor prefers to focus on algebraic topology.

But even a regular topology course relies on abstract algebra. Which, again, is something you’ll get as an undergraduate. If you’re a mathematics major you’ll get at least two years of algebra. And, if my experience is typical, still feel not too sure about the subject. Thing is that Intro to Abstract Algebra is something you’d plausibly take at the same time as Vector Calculus.  Then you’d get Abstract Algebra and then, if you wished, Topology.

So you see the trouble. I don’t remember anything in algebra-to-topology that would demand knowing vector calculus. So it wouldn’t mean Gunther took courses without taking the prerequisites. But it’s odd to take an advanced mathematics course at the same time as a basic mathematics course. Unless Gunther’s taking an advanced vector calculus course, which might be. Although since he wants to emphasize that he’s taking difficult courses, it’s odd to not say “advanced”. Especially if he is tossing in “algebraic” before topology.

And, yes, I’m aware of the Doylist explanation for this. The Evanses wanted courses that sound impressive and hard. And that’s all the scene demands. The joke would not be more successful if they picked two classes from my actual Junior year schedule. None of the characters have a course of study that could be taken literally. They’ve been university students full-time since 2013 and aren’t in their senior year yet. It would be fun, is all, to find a way this makes sense.


This and my other essays discussing something from the comic strips are at this link.

Reading the Comics, January 6, 2015: First of the Year Edition


I apologize for not writing as thoughtfully about the comics this week as I’d like, but it’s been a bit of a rushed week and I haven’t had the chance to do pop-mathematics writing of the kind I like, which is part of why you aren’t right now seeing a post about goldfish. All should be back to normal soon. I’m as ever not sure which is my favorite comic of the bunch this week; I think Bewley may have the strongest, if meanest, joke in it, though as you can see by the text Candorville gave me the most to think about.

Ryan Pagelow’s Buni (December 31) saw out the year with a touch of anthropomorphic-numerals business. Never worry, 4; your time will come again.

He's been snoring not the letter 'Z', but the numeral '2'.
Daniel Beyer’s Long Story Short (January 1, 2015). Snoring humor.

Daniel Beyer’s Long Story Short (January 1) plays a little on the way a carelessly-written Z will morph so easily into a 2, and vice-versa, which serves as a reminder to the people who give out alphanumeric confirmation codes: stop using both 0’s and O’s, and 1’s and I’s, and 2’s and Z’s, in the same code already. I know in the database there’s no confusion about this but in the e-mail you sent out and in the note we wrote down at the airport transcribing this over the phone, there is. And now that it’s mentioned, why is the letter Z used to symbolize snoring? Nobody is sure, but Cecil Adams and The Straight Dope trace it back to the comics, with Rudolph Dirks’s The Katzenjammer Kids either the originator or at least the popularizer of the snoring Z.

Continue reading “Reading the Comics, January 6, 2015: First of the Year Edition”

What Is Calculus I Like?


Although I haven’t got a mathematics class to teach this term, at least not right now, I have thought a bit about it and realized that I’ve surprisingly missed a nearly universal affair: I haven’t had a Calculus I course, the kind taught in big lecture halls capable of seating hundreds of students, literally several of whom are awake and alert and paying attention. The closest I’ve come is a history-of-computation course, with a nominal enrollment of about 130 students, and a similarly sized Introduction to C; but the big mathematics course college students are supposed to get through so they learn they really don’t like calculus, I haven’t done. While I was teaching assistant for some Calculus I courses, I never had professors who wanted me to attend lecture as a regular thing, and I just came in to do recitations.

More, I never had Calculus I as a student. I was in a magnet program in high school that got me enough advanced placement credit that I skipped pretty near the whole freshman year of the mathematics major sequence, and I could jump right into the courses with 30-to-40 student enrollments like Vector Calculus and Introduction to Differential Equations. That was great for me, but it’s finally struck me that I missed a pretty big, pretty common experience.

So I’m curious what it’s like: what the experience is, what students are expecting from their professors, what professors expect from students, how those expectations clash. I know the sorts of class methods I liked as a student and that I like as an instructor, but not how well that fits the attempt to teach a hundred-plus students who are just there because the school requires the passing of some mathematics courses and this is the one they offer 140 sections of.