How July 2016 Treated My Mathematics Blog


I’m not unhappy. Of course not; I can find something cheery to say about whatever my readership in a given month was like. But for a month in which I spent nearly two weeks away from my normal Internet routines of visiting blog friends and belatedly answering comments and the like it wasn’t bad at all.

Readership Numbers:

So there were 1,057 page views in July. That’s down from June’s 1,099, but only a touch, and it’s up from May’s 981. And it’s above a thousand which makes me feel secure about being at least tolerated in these parts. The number of unique visitors was down to 585 from June’s 598 and May’s 627. But the June-to-July drop I can’t imagine is significant.

The number of likes rose to 177, from June’s 155 and May’s 133. I can’t hide it: I’m hoping for 199 in August and I don’t know where it’ll go from there. Comments were down a touch to 33, from June’s 39. But some of that is my failing to respond to other people because I was away. My own comments should count, shouldn’t they?

I am considering making one of those big changes and switching away from the theme — “P2 Classic” — that I have. I like its look, especially that it lets comments appear on the front page around here. But I’ve realized that the theme is a disaster on mobile devices. I don’t want to be needlessly difficult.

At the top of my WordPress theme is a box saying, 'Hi, Joseph. Whatcha up to?' encouraging me to make quick little informal posts which I never ever do.
I don’t know, worrying about what I should post? I’m sorry, I can’t use a slangy informal posting mechanism like this. I’m far too pompous. Also you have no idea how disorienting it is to have this image on my page.

Also while it’s got a nice friendly “Whatcha up to?” panel up top for me, to quickly add a post, I have never used it except when I wanted to search for something and the cursor was in the wrong field. If someone knows of an updated P2 Classic that you can read on a hand phone please let me know. I’d be glad for it.

Popular Posts:

To posts! The most popular stuff around here in July was a fair split between Reading the Comics posts and Theorem Thursday posts, plus a note that something I started back in May would too be returning. I hope to get to that soon again, maybe this week. That’s also comforting. They’re the things I put the most effort into and I’m glad people like them and don’t find much terribly wrong about them. The top five articles in July according to WordPress were:

Listing Countries:

What countries like me? … You know what? Bullet lists are so reportedly popular I’ll just try listing everybody and we’ll see what that does for drumming up interest. Readership by country, per WordPress’s data, were:

Country Readers
United States 616
Canada 57
India 52
United Kingdom 36
Philippines 30
Australia 27
Germany 26
Slovenia 22
Singapore 20
Austria 15
Brazil 15
Spain 13
Thailand 11
Pakistan 10
Puerto Rico 7
Indonesia 6
Ireland 6
Italy 6
Croatia 5
France 5
Hong Kong SAR China 5
New Zealand 5
Sweden 5
China 4
Mexico 4
South Korea 4
Finland 3
Greece 3
Portugal 3
Russia 3
Venezuela 3
Argentina 2
Czech Republic 2
European Union 2
Jordan 2
Netherlands 2
Norway 2
South Africa 2
United Arab Emirates 2
Belgium 1
Chile 1
Denmark 1
Dominican Republic 1
Ecuador 1
Latvia 1
Lithuania 1
Malaysia 1
Oman 1
Saudi Arabia 1
Serbia 1
Tunisia 1
Turkey 1
Ukraine 1 (*)

Ukraine is the only country to have been a single-reader country in June too. This is the nearest clean sweep I’ve noticed. The European Union reader, after seven months being alone, found a friend too. I hope they get along.

Search Term Non-Poetry:

Whew. It’s back.

  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe.
  • what is the average number of grooves on one side of an lp record (if “1” doesn’t satisfy you)
  • arithmetic sequences and series joke 48 (the punch line I’d heard was “why did they laugh so much at 15,268?” “Well, you see, we’d never heard that one before!”)
  • example of convergent boundaries komiks stris (honestly now tempted to commission a comic strip artist just to do something about convergent boundaries.)
  • comics about arithmetic sequence / arithmetic sequence comics (probably I should also commission one about sequences)

Counting Readers:

If I have this right August started with the blog having had 39,394 page views — curse that leap second! — and 16,083 unique viewers. (Because the leap second would give time for one more page view, keeping me from 39,393. If there were a leap second, and if it were at the end of July instead of the end of June. Trust me, if you share a long sequence of assumptions with me then it’s funny.)

WordPress reports me as starting with 610 WordPress.com followers, which feels way up from the start of July’s 597. If you want to join me as a WordPress.com follower there ought to be a button in the upper-right corner, a bit below and to the right of my blog name and above the “Or Follow By Way Of RSS” tag. There’s also a Follow Blog Via Email option and don’t think it doesn’t bother me there’s no dash in E-mail there. More reasons to change the theme I suppose.

I’d wondered last month about WordPress reporting the most popular dates and times around here. So that’s why I moved my default posting time from 11 am Eastern to 2 pm Eastern. But just as in July the most popular day is Sunday (22 percent of page views). Comics posts I suppose. The most popular hour remains 3:00 pm (9 percent of page views). It kind of suggests the time of posting doesn’t matter to people. We’ll see, as I start trying 6 am or if I try something really wild like eleventy-q pm.

See you, I expect, tomorrow with comic strips.

What Did I Post On Theorem Thursdays?


Hi again folks. I don’t want you to think I forgot about my little blog here. I’ve just been off for a pretty major competitive-pinball event the past week and that and a visit to the Kennywood amusement park slurped up all my writing time. Should be recovered soon enough.

I’ll be back to posting original stuff soon enough, and to posting links to other people’s stuff. But for now I wanted to gather links to all the Theorem Thursday now that the project’s safely at its pre-announced conclusion. I’ve have thoughts about what it all meant soon, too.

Over June and July I put up rather extended posts about:

I do figure on returning to these long-form explanations of theorems, so that Mean Value Theorem and Fixed Point Theorem stuff shouldn’t be left dangling forever. I don’t know just when I will, though. I’ll discuss why that is in my “what-did-I-learn” post, when I have the chance.

Bourbaki and How To Write Numbers, A Trifle


So my attempt at keeping the Reading the Comics posts to Sunday has crashed and burned again. This time for a good reason. As you might have read between the lines on my humor blog, I spent the past week on holiday and just didn’t have time to write stuff. I barely had time to read my comics. I’ll get around to it this week.

In the meanwhile then I’d like to point people to the MathsByAGirl blog. The blog recently had an essay on Nicolas Bourbaki, who’s among the most famous mathematicians of the 20th century. Bourbaki is also someone with a tremendous and controversial legacy, one that I expect to touch on as I catch up on last week’s comics. If you don’t know the secret of Bourbaki then do go over and learn it. If you do, well, go over and read anyway. The author’s wondering whether to write more about Bourbaki’s mathematics and while I’m all in favor of that more people should say.

And as I promised a trifle, let me point to something from my own humor blog. How To Write Out Numbers is an older trifle based on everyone’s love for copy-editing standards. I had forgotten I wrote it before digging it up for a week of self-glorifying posts last week. I hope folks around here like it too.

Oh, one more thing: it’s the anniversary of the publishing of an admirable but incorrect proof of the four-color map theorem. It would take another century to get right. As I said Thursday, the five-color map theorem is easy. it’s that last color that’s hard.

Vacations are grand but there is always that comfortable day or two once you’re back home.

What I Learned Doing The Leap Day 2016 Mathematics A To Z


The biggest thing I learned in the recently concluded mathematics glossary is that continued fractions have enthusiasts. I hadn’t intended to cause controversy when I claimed they weren’t much used anymore. The most I have grounds to say is that the United States educational process as I experienced it doesn’t use them for more than a few special purposes. There is a general lesson there. While my experience may be typical, that doesn’t mean everyone’s is like it. There is a mystery to learn from in that.

The next big thing I learned was the Kullbach-Leibler Divergence. I’m glad to know it now. And I would not have known it, I imagine, if it weren’t for my trying something novel and getting a fine result from it. That was throwing open the A To Z glossary to requests from readers. At least half the terms were ones that someone reading my original call had asked for.

And that was thrilling. It gave me a greater feeling that I was communicating with specific people than most of the things that I’ve written, is the biggest point. I understand that I have readers, and occasionally chat with some. This was a rare chance to feel engaged, though.

And getting asked things I hadn’t thought of, or in some cases hadn’t heard of, was great. It foiled the idea of two months’ worth of easy postings, but it made me look up and learn and think about a variety of things. And also to re-think them. My first drafts of the Dedekind Domain and the Kullbach-Leibler divergence essays were completely scrapped, and the Jacobian made it through only with a lot of rewriting. I’ve been inclined to write with few equations and even fewer drawings around here. Part of that’s to be less intimidating. Part of that’s because of laziness. Some stuff is wonderfully easy to express in a sketch, but transferring that to a digital form is the heavy work of getting out the scanner and plugging it in. Or drawing from scratch on my iPad. Cleaning it up is even more work. So better to spend a thousand extra words on the setup.

But that seemed to work! I’m especially surprised that the Jacobian and the Lagrangian essays seemed to make sense without pictures or equations. Homomorphisms and isomorphisms were only a bit less surprising. I feel like I’ve been writing better thanks to this.

I do figure on another A To Z for sometime this summer. Perhaps I should open nominations already, and with a better-organized scheme for knocking out letters. Some people were disappointed (I suppose) by picking letters that had already got assigned. And I could certainly use time and help finding more x- and y-words. Q isn’t an easy one either.

Some More Mathematics Stuff To Read


And some more reasy reading, because, why not? First up is a new Twitter account from Chris Lusto (Lustomatical), a high school teacher with interest in Mathematical Twitter. He’s constructed the Math-Twitter-Blog-o-Sphere Bot, which retweets postings of mathematics blogs. They’re drawn from his blogroll, and a set of posts comes up a couple of times per day. (I believe he’s running the bot manually, in case it starts malfunctioning, for now.) It could be a useful way to find something interesting to read, or if you’ve got your own mathematics blog, a way to let other folks know you want to be found interesting.

Also possibly of interest is Gregory Taylor’s Any ~Qs comic strip blog. Taylor is a high school teacher and an amateur cartoonist. He’s chosen the difficult task of drawing a comic about “math equations as people”. It’s always hard to do a narrowly focused web comic. You can see Taylor working out the challenges of writing and drawing so that both story and teaching purposes are clear. I would imagine, for example, people to giggle at least at “tangent pants” even if they’re not sure what a domain restriction would have to do with anything, or even necessarily mean. But it is neat to see someone trying to go beyond anthropomorphized numerals in a web comic. And, after all, Math With Bad Drawings has got the hang of it.

Finally, an article published in Notices of the American Mathematical Society, and which I found by some reference now lost to me. The essay, “Knots in the Nursery:(Cats) Cradle Song of James Clerk Maxwell”, is by Professor Daniel S Silver. It’s about the origins of knot theory, and particularly of a poem composed by James Clerk Maxwell. Knot theory was pioneered in the late 19th century by Peter Guthrie Tait. Maxwell is the fellow behind Maxwell’s Equations, the description of how electricity and magnetism propagate and affect one another. Maxwell’s also renowned in statistical mechanics circles for explaining, among other things, how the rings of Saturn could work. And it turns out he could write nice bits of doggerel, with references Silver usefully decodes. It’s worth reading for the mathematical-history content.

How 2015 Treated My Mathematics Blog


Oh yeah, I also got one of these. WordPress put together a review of what all went on around here last year. The most startling thing to me is that I had 188 posts over the course of the year. A lot of that is thanks to the A To Z project, which gave me something to post each day for 31 days in a row. If I’d been thinking just a tiny bit harder I’d have come up with two more posts and made a clean sweep of June.

The unit of comparison for my readership this year was the Sydney Opera House. That’s a great comparison because everybody thinks they know how big an opera house is. It reminds me of a bit in Carl Sagan and and Ann Druyan’s Comet in which they compare the speed of an Oort cloud comet puttering around the sun to the speed of a biplane. We may have only a foggy idea how fast that is (I guess maybe a hundred miles per hour?) but it sounds nice and homey.

How December 2015 Treated My Mathematics Blog


I had expected December 2015 would see a decline in my readership. I didn’t have the spillover effect of my humor blog getting so much Apartment 3-G curiosity. The readership did drop, although not quite alarmingly. So let’s review that.

According to WordPress’s statistics page there were 954 views of these parts in December. That’s well down from November’s 3-G boosted 1,215. But it’s up from the 733 in October and 708 in September, and it’s the fifth highest of the past year. The number of unique visitors dropped, from 519 down to 449. That’s also up from October’s 405 and September’s 381. And it’s the fourth-highest of the past twelve months. There were fifteen posts in the month again, although I admit not all of them were really deep pieces. Some were just nagging people to read other things I’d written.

The reader-engagement data was up a tiny bit. The mathematics blog got back up to 245 likes in December, up from November’s 220 and October’s 244. It’s nowhere near the peaks of June (518), but June was the midst of the Summer A To Z glossary and that drew a lot of steady readers in. I should do another one. The number of comments rose to 56, up from November’s 37 and October’s 47. Again, that’s nowhere near June and July’s highs (114 and 100). But again, I didn’t have anything themed nearly so tightly going on.

I think that I could have had slightly better readership, and engagement, if I hadn’t gotten overwhelmed the last third of the month. I just stopped being able to go pay calls on other blogs, and leave comments and likes and whatnot to other writers. So I couldn’t reasonably expect folks to stop in here either. The weekly count of views and visitors certainly drops around then. But then most of the rest of western civilization also had a busy time in late December. But the holidays have mostly wrapped up, and I should be back to normal social-Internet stuff soon. I’d like to think I’ll be, anyway.

The most popular stuff around here — well, most of the popular articles were Reading the Comics series articles. I’ll just lump those together into one category if that’s all right by you. But the most popular stuff would be:

The countries sending me the most readers were nearly the usual set: the United States with 641 pages views, the United Kingdom with 50, the Canada with 45, the Germany with 27, and the India with 21. That’s my best India showing on record, I believe. Singapore sent me five page views.

Single-reader countries this time were Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belgium, Czech Republic, the European Union, Indonesia, Ireland, Lithuania, Nigeria, and Taiwan. I still don’t understand what the European Union is doing listed there. But Belgium and Nigeria are on three-month streaks there. Nobody’s on a four-month streak.

And among the interesting search terms to come up:

  • peppermint patty couldn’t solve the following math problems (most of them, really)
  • snoring jokes (my love would tell you my snoring is not a joke; it’s enough to rattle this house apart)
  • why are wizard of id classics being reprinted (well, they’re pretty solidly funny)
  • comic strip math problem solving algebra rae (I don’t know what the ‘rae’ is and assume it’s a cry of delight)
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe. (I think they’re just trying to creep my out now)
  • 22 decmber mathematics day topics (I believe that’s India’s national mathematics day. I don’t think I have any particularly interesting content for it, but I should maybe work on that)

I start the month of January with 553 total WordPress followers. And I start with 31,253 total page views and 11,721 total unique visitors as WordPress figures these things.

Reading the Comics, November 21, 2015: Communication Edition


And then three days pass and I have enough comic strips for another essay. That’s fine by me, really. I picked this edition’s name because there’s a comic strip that actually touches on information theory, and another that’s about a much-needed mathematical symbol, and another about the ways we represent numbers. That’s enough grounds for me to use the title.

Samson’s Dark Side Of The Horse for the 19th of November looks like this week’s bid for an anthropomorphic numerals joke. I suppose it’s actually numeral cosplay instead. I’m amused, anyway.

Zach Weinersmith’s Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal for the 19th of November makes a patent-law joke out of the invention of zero. It’s also an amusing joke. It may be misplaced, though. The origins of zero as a concept is hard enough to trace. We can at least trace the symbol zero. In Finding Zero: A Mathematician’s Odyssey to Uncover the Origins of Numbers, Amir D Aczel traces out not just the (currently understood) history of Arabic numerals, but some of how the history of that history has evolved, and finally traces down the oldest known example of a written (well, carved) zero.

Tony Cochrane’s Agnes for the 20th of November is at heart just a joke about a student’s apocalyptically bad grades. It contains an interesting punch line, though, in Agnes’s statement that “math people are dreadful spellers”. I haven’t heard that before. It might be a joke about algebra introducing letters into numbers. But it does seem to me there’s a supposition that mathematics people aren’t very good writers or speakers. I do remember back as an undergraduate other people on the student newspaper being surprised I could write despite majoring in physics and mathematics. That may reflect people remembering bad experiences of sitting in class with no idea what the instructor was going on about. It’s easy to go from “I don’t understand this mathematics class” to “I don’t understand mathematics people”.

Steve Sicula’s Home and Away for the 20th of November is about using gambling as a way to teach mathematics. So it would be a late entry for the recent Gambling Edition of the Reading The Comics posts. Although this strip is a rerun from the 15th of August, 2008, so it’s actually an extremely early entry.

Ruben Bolling’s Tom The Dancing Bug for the 20th of November is a Super-Fun-Pak Comix installment. And for a wonder it hasn’t got a Chaos Butterfly sequence. Under the Guy Walks Into A Bar label is a joke about a horse doing arithmetic that itself swings into a base-ten joke. In this case it’s suggested the horse would count in base four, and I suppose that’s plausible enough. The joke depends on the horse pronouncing a base four “10” as “ten”, when the number is actually “four”. But the lure of the digits is very hard to resist, and saying “four” suggests the numeral “4” whatever the base is supposed to be.

Mark Leiknes’s Cow and Boy for the 21st of November is a rerun from the 9th of August, 2008. It mentions the holographic principle, which is a neat concept. The principle’s explained all right in the comic. The idea was first developed in the late 1970s, following the study of black hole thermodynamics. Black holes are fascinating because the mathematics of them suggest they have a temperature, and an entropy, and even information which can pass into and out of them. This study implied that information about the three-dimensional volume of the black hole was contained entirely in the two-dimensional surface, though. From here things get complicated, though, and I’m going to shy away from describing the whole thing because I’m not sure I can do it competently. It is an amazing thing that information about a volume can be encoded in the surface, though, and vice-versa. And it is astounding that we can imagine a logically consistent organization of the universe that has a structure completely unlike the one our senses suggest. It’s a lasting and hard-to-dismiss philosophical question. How much of the way the world appears to be structured is the result of our minds, our senses, imposing that structure on it? How much of it is because the world is ‘really’ like that? (And does ‘really’ mean anything that isn’t trivial, then?)

I should make clear that while we can imagine it, we haven’t been able to prove that this holographic universe is a valid organization. Explaining gravity in quantum mechanics terms is a difficult point, as it often is.

Dave Blazek’s Loose Parts for the 21st of November is a two- versus three-dimensions joke. The three-dimension figure on the right is a standard way of drawing x-, y-, and z-axes, organized in an ‘isometric’ view. That’s one of the common ways of drawing three-dimensional figures on a two-dimensional surface. The two-dimension figure on the left is a quirky representation, but it’s probably unavoidable as a way to make the whole panel read cleanly. Usually when the axes are drawn isometrically, the x- and y-axes are the lower ones, with the z-axis the one pointing vertically upward. That is, they’re the ones in the floor of the room. So the typical two-dimensional figure would be the lower axes.

How October Treated My Mathematics Blog


So, that wasn’t as bad as September. Last month I began my review of readership with the sad news I’d lost about a fifth of my readers from August. I haven’t got them all back yet. But the number of page views did rise to 733 in October. It’s just a bit over September’s 708, but that’s an improvement. That’s a good trend. But I do notice there was a little readership rise between July and August, and then the bottom dropped out. And 733 is still fewer than the number of readers my humor blog got from just people trying to figure out what the heck is wrong with the comic strip Apartment 3-G. (Nothing is happening in Apartment 3-G and the rumor is the strip’s been cancelled.)

The number of unique visitors rose, from 381 to 405. That’s only the eighth-highest result of the past twelve months. But it is only a little below the twelve-month average. (If you’d like to know: the 12-month mean number of visitors was 419.55, and standard deviation 39.715, so there you go. The median was 415.)

The number of likes rose again, from September’s absolutely unpopular 188 to a tolerable 244. That’s a little below the twelve-month mean (266.91) and twelve-month median (259), although given the standard deviation is 107.71 that’s hardly anything off the average.

The number of comments rose to 47, which looks good compared to September’s 25, but is nothing compared to the glory days of August and its 95 and the like. That’s farther below the twelve-month mean of 68.9 and median of 64 (standard deviation of 30), but, eh. I’ll take signs of hope. I maybe need to publicize more of my better material, more often.

Countries sending me readers have been the United States with 387 page views, the United Kingdom with 55, the Canada with 48, the Austria with 33, and the Philippines with 25. India only offered fourteen page views; Singapore, nine. The European Union got listed with five.

Single-reader countries for October were Belgium, Czech Republic, Georgia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Paraguay, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Uruguay. Repeats from September on that list are Saudia Arabia and Uruguay. None of the countries are on a three-month streak.

Among the most popular posts the past month were, of course, Reading the Comics surveys. To avoid flooding the list of what’s popular I’ll just list the category for Comic Strips instead.

  1. Reading the Comics, an ongoing series.
  2. How Many Trapezoids I Can Draw which hasn’t made the top-five or top-ten in a couple months. Curious.
  3. The Set Tour, Part 6: One Big One Plus Some Rubble and I’m glad to see this series getting a little bit of love. I’m having more fun with this than I’ve had with anything since the Summer A To Z.
  4. Phase Equilibria and the usefulness of μ, a reblogged post that’s part of my attempt to get people to pay attention to statistical mechanics.
  5. The Kind Of Book That Makes Me Want To Refocus On Logic, talking about a book I liked. I should probably talk about books I like more.

The search terms were mostly the usual bunch: origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe and otto soglow little king and how fast is earth spinning. Delighting me, although I haven’t got anything to answer it exactly, was +how to start a pinball league. I’ve picked up a couple things about how they work, but that’s kind of outside the mathematics field proper.

The Set Tour, Part 5: C^n


The next piece in this set tour is a hybrid. It mixes properties of the last two sets. And I’ll own up now that while it’s a set that gets used a lot, it’s one that gets used a lot in just some corners of mathematics. It’s got a bit of that “Internet fame”. In particular circles it’s well-known; venture outside those circles even a little, and it’s not. But it leads us into other, useful places.

Cn

C here is the set of complex-valued numbers. We may have feared them once, but now they’re friends, or at least something we can work peacefully with. n here is some counting number, just as it is with Rn. n could be one or two or forty or a hundred billion. It’ll be whatever fits the problem we’re doing, if we need to pin down its value at all.

The reference to Rn, another friend, probably tipped you off to the rest. The items in Cn are n-tuples, ordered sets of some number n of numbers. Each of those numbers is itself a complex-valued number, something from C. Cn gets typeset in bold, and often with that extra vertical stroke on the left side of the C arc. It’s handwritten that way, too.

As with Rn we can add together things in Cn. Suppose that we are in C2 so that I don’t have to type too much. Suppose the first number is (2 + i, -3 – 3*i) and the second number is (6 – 2*i, 2 + 9*i). There could be fractions or irrational numbers in the real and imaginary components, but I don’t want to type that much. The work is the same. Anyway, the sum will be another number in Cn. The first term in that sum will be the sum of the first term in the first number, 2 + i, and the first term in the second number, 6 – 2*i. That in turn will be the sum of the real and of the imaginary components, so, 2 + 6 + i – 2*i, or 8 – i all told. The second term of the sum will be the second term of the first number, -3 – 3*i, and the second term of the second number, 2 + 9*i, which will be -3 – 3*i + 2 + 9*i or, all told, -1 + 6*i. The sum is the n-tuple (8 – i, -1 + 6*i).

And also as with Rn there really isn’t multiplying of one term of Cn by another. Generally, we can’t do this in any useful way. We can multiply something in Cn by a scalar, a single real — or, why not, complex-valued — number, though.

So let’s start out with (8 – i, -1 + 6*i), a number in C2. And then pick a scalar, say, 2 + 2*i. It doesn’t have to be complex-valued, but, why not? The product of this scalar and this term will be another number in C2. Its first term will the scalar, 2 + 2*i, multiplied by the first term in it, 8 – i. That’s (2 + 2*i) * (8 – i), or 2*8 – 2*i + 16*i – 2*i*i, or 2*8 – 2*i + 16*i + 2, or 18 + 14*i. And then its second term will be the scalar 2 + 2*i multiplied by the second term, -1 + 6*i. That’s (2 + 2*i)*(-1 + 6*i), or 2*(-1) + 2*6*i -2*i + 2*6*i*i. And that’s -2 + 12*i – 2*i -12, or -14 + 10*i. So the product is (18 + 14*i, -14 + 10*i).

So as with Rn, Cn creates a “vector space”. These spaces are useful in complex analysis. They’re also useful in the study of affine geometry, a corner of geometry that I’m sad to admit falls outside what I studied. I have tried reading up on them on my own, and I run aground each time. I understand the basic principles but never quite grasp why they are interesting. That’s my own failing, of course, and I’d be glad for a pointer that explained in ways I understood why they’re so neat.

I do understand some of what’s neat about them: affine geometry tells us what we can know about shapes without using the concept of “distance”. When you discover that we can know anything about shapes without the idea of “distance” your imagination should be fired. Mine is, too. I just haven’t followed from that to feel comfortable with the terminology and symbols of the field.

You could, if you like, think of Cn as being a specially-delineated version of R2*n. This is just as you can see a complex number as an ordered pair of real numbers. But sometimes information is usefully thought of as a single, complex-valued number. And there is a value in introducing the idea of ordered sets of things that are not real numbers. We will see the concept again.


Also, the heck did I write an 800-word essay about the family of sets of complex-valued n-tuples and have Hemingway Editor judge it to be at the “Grade 3” reading level? I rarely get down to “Grade 6” when I do a Reading the Comics post explaining how Andertoons did a snarky-word-problem-answers panel. That’s got to be a temporary glitch.

How September 2015 Treated My Mathematics Blog


So, well, that was disappointing. My readership was off in September. The month saw the fewest page views since November of 2014. The number of unique visitors was only back to about what it was in June of 2015, though, which is less alarming. Still, I can’t fault WordPress’s suspect statistics, not without inconsistency. My humor blog saw its highest readership on record and if I accept that, I have to accept the other.

The humor blog readership I understand. I started explaining what the heck was going on in Apartment 3-G and it’s been really baffling for a long while now because nothing has been going on since February, maybe March at the latest. You can see how that attracts eager readers.

But here’s the sad numbers count: there were 708 views on the mathematics blog in September, down from 909 in August and 863 in July. And well done from June’s record of 1,051.

The number of unique visitors was 381, down from August’s 506 and July’s 415. June had only 367 unique visitors, but that was part of the big Summer 2015 Mathematics A To Z project. That’s probably why more people were reading, too.

I can’t even point to signs of reader engagement. The number of likes was down to 188, compared to August’s 282 and July’s 381. Extrapolating, November should see me get a negative number of likes. Comments are even worse: after three months in a row of about a hundred comments each there were only 25 in September.

So as I say, disappointing. I can think of a few things I did differently in September. The most obvious is that I didn’t have the time I needed to go around to other mathematics blogs and pay visits. I can’t fault people not coming around to me when I don’t come around to them. And I can admit that September didn’t have the richest diversity of postings. A lot of it was Reading the Comics posts, which are fun but I admit also prone to sameness. On the other hand, those are the most popular posts too. I haven’t found a new project that engages my imagination the way the A To Z did, although I think the Set Tour has promise.

I would also put some blame on WordPress’s Publicize, which they keep making worse and worse. See, Publicize announces new posts to Twitter and whatever other social media networks you have linked to it. And in the old days of, like, May, it just worked. By default it posted the name of the article and a wp.me shortened link. If you wanted to customize this you could hit an ‘edit’ button and the article name and wp.me shortened link were there at the start, and it was easy to add a short sentence to tell people what’s happening.

But in June they stopped with the wp.me shortened links; instead it shows as much of the full URL as fits in the Twitter 140-character limit after whatever text you enter. And last month they made it worse. It’ll give the article name as a suggested default publicity post, but you have to copy-paste or retype the name to get even that. The message WordPress is sending is, clearly, ‘stop using Publicize’, although what they have as a substitue is unclear.

I suspect what they mean for us to do is use the new modernized article-entry page. The trouble is, the page is awful. It might be salvageable, or something I could get used to, in time. But it’s also this very watery and Ajax-dependent thing that assumes you have fast, reliable Internet. And I don’t. I have AT&T, which has no interest in providing high-speed Internet to my neighborhood and possibly my city. They aren’t even willing to pretend they mean to bring it in anytime soon. We’d dump them happily but the only alternative right now is Kabletown and goodness knows that’s a recipe for disaster. I suspect AT&T and Kabletown have decided not to compete for the Lansing, Michigan, market and we’re stuck between awful we know and awful we know we’d flee to.

Anyway, my suspicion is that the equivalent of Publicize for the newfangled WordPress add-a-post page works better. But that is blaming WordPress for my own laziness; there’s no reason I couldn’t put in the post and wp.me link and a clear #math tag so people know what they’re getting into. It just seemed like too much work. I suppose for a week or two I should try changing just that and see if there’s an appreciable difference.

I’m sorry to turn all this into a round of crankiness, especially when I can think of easy things I should be doing to get better results. I’m just sulking. It’ll pass.

My Mathematics Blog’s July 2015 Statistics, Plus Their Implications


Start of the month, so, it’s time to review my readership numbers. July was not as busy a month as June. I expected that. With the wrap-up of the A To Z glossary there were fewer posts in July than in June, and one can expect people to come to read posts. There weren’t that many fewer — 24 posts in July, versus 28 in June — but every bit counts.

So the number of page views dropped from 1,051 in June to 863 in July. The number of unique visitors rose, though, from 367 up to 415. The 415 visitors equals that in May. Is this a matter of just fewer posts? Perhaps. The number of views per posting dropped from 37.5 in June to 36.0 in July; that seems near enough identical. The number of unique visitors per posting rose from 13.1 in June to 17.3 in July, though.

What makes this interesting is these ratios for May. That month had 936 views, 415 visitors, and a scant twelve posts published. That implies 78 views per post, and 34.6 viewers per post. This seems to suggest the best readership-per-effort involvement is not necessarily daily.

The number of Likes received was down, too, from 518 in June to 382 in July. That’s my second-best on record, though. The number of likes per posting dropped from 18.5 to 16.0, which still seems probably about the same. The May ratio was 21.6 likes per posting. The number of comments dropped insignificantly, from 114 in June to 100 in July. The comments-per-posting rose from 4.1 to 4.2, no way a meaningful change. Though, still, in May, with 84 comments and twelve posts, I had a comments-per-posting ratio of 7.

This might suggest I’m best off posting every other day, or maybe even every third day, rather than going for a daily or near-daily schedule.

The greatest number of visitors came as ever from the United States, with 502. Canada sent the next-greatest number, 61 viewers. The United Kingdom came in third at 41. Italy was fourth, at 39 views, and the Philippines 37. I’m glad to have these readers, though I don’t know what’s got me interested in Italy and the Philippines. India sent me 14 viewers, down from June’s 15. Nobody’s listed as being from the European Union, although individual countries within it have a bunch of readers.

Single-reader countries for July were: Albania, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Estonia, Greece, Mexico, Nepal, Norway, Portugal, Serbia, and the United Arab Emirates. Czech Republic is the only country that was also a single-viewer country last month.

The most popular posts over July were, if we can trust WordPress’s statistics:

  1. Reading the Comics, April 20, 2015: History of Mathematics Edition
  2. Reading the Comics, July 4, 2015: Symbolic Curiosities Edition
  3. Reading the Comics, July 24, 2015: All The Popular Topics Are Here Edition
  4. Reading the Comics, July 19, 2015: Rerun Comics Edition
  5. A Summer 2015 Mathematics A To Z: tensor
  6. Lewis Carroll Tries Changing The Way You See Trigonometry
  7. A Summer 2015 Mathematics A To Z: ring

There’s no search term poetry again, alas, although a few things came up. Among them:

  • bloom county 2015 (something I don’t think I ever mentioned, but six people came here looking for it)
  • susan from between friends (Between Friends is one of the comic strips regularly featured around here)
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe.
  • comics strip for sum of difference of two binomials (are there any?)
  • chain rule card sort (not sure what this means, but I’m intrigued)
  • math statistics of the 80s (again, not sure what this means)

I start the month with a total of 26,734 views, and alongside that 1,946 comments. I expect the 2,000th comment to come sometime in August. I’m curious what it’ll be.

And then to remind people to read my blog, in a post on my blog. There’s this “Follow Blog via Email” link that, at least in the P2 Classic theme I’m using right now, is over on the upper right of the page. You can do that. If you have an RSS reader, https://nebusresearch.wordpress.com/feed/ will give you posts. https://nebusresearch.wordpress.com/comments/feed/ will give you comments, although that’s got to be a baffling feed. And my regular old Twitter account is @Nebusj. Thanks for existing and all that.

What I Learned Doing The A To Z Project


So now I’ve had the chance to rest a little and recover from the Summer 2015 Mathematics A To Z Project. I’d been inspired to it by Sue Archer and her Doorway Between Worlds blog. I had piggybacked on her discussing the word “into” with a description of its mathematical use.

The first thing I learned is that it’s easy to write several week’s worth of essays in a big session if I have a clear idea what they’re all to be about. That left me feeling good. I do worry when I go several days without anything fresh or more than the reblog of someone’s interesting pictures. I like sharing someone else’s interesting pictures too, mind you. I just know it’s not work on my part to share them. Also when I had to travel a while in May and June, and when my computer was out for repairs, I didn’t have to scramble to do anything.

Another is that I liked the format, which had me jumping around several concentrations of mathematics. It also had me jump from common enough levels into math-major stuff all the way to grad school stuff. I particularly liked trying to introduce graduate-level mathematics in tolerably clear English and in around a thousand words. Helping me out here was the Hemmingway Editor, which attempts to judge how complicated one’s writing is. It’s in favor of shorter, clearer sentences with fewer adverbs and no uses of the word “very”. I can’t agree with everything it judges. It’s a computer, after all. But writing about advanced subjects while watching how complicated my sentences came out has helped my prose style.

Something else I’ve learned from this is that there’s a taste for pop-mathematics about more advanced topics. It’s easy to suppose that people who never studied, or never liked studying, mathematics are most likely to read about the easy stuff. That’s probably not quite so. Probably what people really want is to feel like they’re being let in on the cool stuff. Mathematics has a lot of cool stuff. A lot of it requires a long running start, though. For example, I couldn’t talk about a ring until I’d described what a group was. So that essay felt like it was taking forever to get started while I wrote it. I don’t know how it felt to people reading it. The z-transform, similarly, has a lot that’s neat about it, but it took a while to get there. I hope it stayed promising long enough for people to stick through it.

My terror throughout writing all 26 entries was that I was about to say something really, obviously stupid, and that a flock of mathematicians would descend on me. Scorn and semiprofessional humiliation would follow. I’m still a bit worried, although nobody’s said anything too bad to me yet.

The project was quite good for my readership. Between the A to Z essays, Reading the Comics posts, occasional other essays, and reblogs, I went a solid thirty days with something new posted every day. That’s surely why June was my most-read month here ever. And why July, though having fewer posts, was still pretty well-read. I confess I’m disappointed and a bit surprised I never hit the “Freshly Pressed” lottery with any of these. But that’s just the natural envy any writer has. Everybody else always seems to be more successful.

I’d like to do a similar thematically linked project. I might in a few months do another A to Z. I’m open to other themes, though, and would love to hear suggestions.

How May 2015 Treated My Mathematics Blog


For May 2015 I tried a new WordPress theme — P2 Classic — and I find I rather like it. Unfortunately it seems to be rubbish on mobile devices and I’m not WordPress Theme-equipped-enough to figure out how to fix that. I’m sorry, mobile readers. I’m honestly curious whether the theme change affected my readership, which was down appreciably over May.

According to WordPress, the number of pages viewed here dropped to 936 in May, down just over ten percent from April’s 1047 and also below March’s 1022. Perhaps the less-mobile-friendly theme was shooing people away. Maybe not, though: in March and April I’d posted 14 articles each, while in May there were a mere twelve. The number of views per post increased steadily, from 73 in March to just under 75 in April to 78 in May. I’m curious if this signifies anything. I may get some better idea next month. June should have at least 13 posts from the Mathematics A To Z gimmick, plus this statistics post, and there’ll surely be at least two Reading The Comics posts, or at least sixteen posts. And who knows what else I’ll feel like throwing in? It’ll be an interesting experiment at least.

Anyway, the number of unique visitors rose to 415 in May, up from April’s 389 but still below March’s 468. The number of views per visitor dropped to 2.26, far below April’s 2.68, but closer in line with March’s 2.18. And 2.26 is close to the normal count for this sort of thing.

The number of likes on posts dropped to 259. In April it was 296 likes and in March 265. That may just reflect the lower number of posts, though. Divide the number of likes by the number of posts and March saw an average of 18.9, April 21.14, and May 21.58. That’s all at least consistent, although there’s not much reason to suppose that only things from the current month were liked.

The number of comments recovered also. May saw 83 comments, up from April’s 64, but not quite back to March’s 93. That comes to, for May, 6.9 comments for each post, but that’s got to be counting links to other posts, including pingbacks and maybe the occasional reblogging. I’ve been getting chattier with folks around here, but not seven comments per post chatty.

June starts at 24,820 views, and 485 people following specifically through WordPress.

I’ve got a healthy number of popular posts the past month; all of these got at least 37 page views each. I cut off at 37 because that’s where the Trapezoids one came in and we already know that’s popular. More popular than that were:

I have the suspicion that comics fans are catching on, quietly, to all this stuff.

Now the countries report. The nations sending me at least twenty page views were the United States (476), the United Kingdom (85), Canada (65), Italy (53), and Austria (20).

Sending just a single reader were Belgium, Bulgaria, Colombia, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Romania, and Vietnam. Romania is on a three-month single-reader streak; Vietnam, two. India sent me a mere two readers, down from six last month. The European Union sent me three.

And among the interesting search terms this past month were:

  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe.
  • how to do a cube box (the cube is easy enough, it’s getting the boxing gloves on that’s hard)
  • popeye “computer king” (Remember that comic?)
  • google can you show me in 1 trapezoid how many cat how many can you make of 2 (?, although I like the way Google is named at the start of the query, like someone on Next Generation summoning the computer)
  • plato “divided line” “arthur cayley” (I believe that mathematics comes in on the lower side of the upper half of Plato’s divided line)
  • where did negative numbers originate from

Someday I must work out that “origin is the gateway” thing.

Reading the Comics, April 27, 2015: Anthropomorphic Mathematics Edition


They’re not running at the frantic pace of April 21st, but there’s still been a fair clip of comic strips that mention some kind of mathematical topic. I imagine Comic Strip Master Command wants to be sure to use as many of these jokes up as possible before the (United States) summer vacation sets in.

Dan Thompson’s Brevity (April 23) is a straightforward pun strip. It also shows a correct understanding of how to draw a proper Venn Diagram. And after all why shouldn’t an anthropomorphized Venn Diagram star in movies too?

John Atkinson’sWrong Hands (April 23) gets into more comfortable territory with plain old numbers being anthropomorphized. The 1 is fair to call this a problem. What kind of problem depends on whether you read the x as a multiplication sign or as a variable x. If it’s a multiplication sign then I can’t think of any true statement that can be made from that bundle of symbols. If it’s the variable x then there are surprisingly many problems which could be made, particularly if you’re willing to count something like “x = 718” as a problem. I think that it works out to 24 problems but would accept contrary views. This one ended up being the most interesting to me once I started working out how many problems you could make with just those symbols. There’s a fun question for your combinatorics exam in that.

Continue reading “Reading the Comics, April 27, 2015: Anthropomorphic Mathematics Edition”

How My Mathematics Blog Was Read, For January 2015


And after reaching 20,000 views on the final day of December, 2014, could I reach 21,000 views by the end of January? Probably I could have, but in point of fact I did not. I am not complaining, though: I finished the month with 20,956 page views all told, after a record 944 pages got viewed by somebody, somewhere, for some reason. This is a record high for me, going well past the 831 that had been the January 2013 and December 2014 (tied) record. And likely I’ll reach 21,000 in the next couple days anyway.

According to WordPress, this was read by 438 distinct visitors, reading 2.16 views per visitor on average. That isn’t quite a record: January 2013 remains my high count for visitors, at 473, but it’s still, all told, some pretty nice numbers especially considering I don’t think I had my best month of blog-writing. I can’t wait to get some interesting new topics in here for February and see that they interest absolutely nobody.

The new WordPress statistics page is still awful, don’t get me wrong, but it has been getting a little bit better, and it does offer some new data I couldn’t gather easily before. Among them: that in January 205 I received 197 likes overall — a high for the past twelvemonth, which is as far as I can figure out how to get it, and up from 128 in December — and 51 comments, up from December 29, and also a high for the twelvemonth.

The three countries sending me viewers were, once again, the big three of the United States (594), Canada (56), and the United Kingdom (52), with Austria sending in 32 viewers, and Germany and Argentina ending 22 each. And India, for a wonder sent me a noticeable-to-me 18 readers, although on a per capita basis that still isn’t very many, I admit.

There was a bumper crop of single-reader countries, though, up from last month’s six: Belgium, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Hungary, Indonesia, Iraq, Japan, Kuwait, Libya, Mexico, Paraguay, Slovakia, and the United Arab Emirates each found only one person viewing anything around here. Greece and Mexico are repeats from December.

This month’s most popular articles were mostly comic strip posts, although they were a pretty popular set; none of these had fewer than 35 views per, which feels high to me. The top posts of the last 30 days, then, were:

  1. Reading the Comics, January 6, 2015: First of the Year Edition, in which I included drawing a sloppy `2′ as a snoring `Z’ as somehow connected to mathematics.
  2. Reading the Comics, January 24, 2015: Many, But Not Complicated Edition, which includes an explanation for why margins of errors on surveys are always like three or four percent.
  3. Reading the Comics, January 11, 2015: Standard Genres And Bloom County Edition, in which I reveal my best guess for Jon Bon Jovi’s shorts size in the late 80s.
  4. 20,000: My Math Blog’s Statistics, because my narcissism is apparently quite popular?
  5. Reading the Comics, January 17, 2015: Finding Your Place Edition, where, again, I can flog that thing about a watch as a compass.
  6. How Many Trapezoids I Can Draw, which also reveals how many trapeziums I think are different in interesting ways.
  7. A bit more about Thomas Hobbes, and his attempt to redefine the very nature of mathematics, which didn’t succeed in quite the way he wanted.

Among the interesting search terms that brought people here the past month have been ([sic] on all of them):

  • science fiction and trapazoids (Somebody should totally write the definitive SFnal treatment of trapezoids, I agree.)
  • food. stotagre nebus (I feel strangely threatened by this.)
  • a group of student offer at least one of mathematics,physics, and statistcs , 14 of them offer mathematics, 12 offer physics,and 16 offer statistics.7 offer statistics and maths 6 offer maths and physics, 4 offer physics and statistics only, while 5 offer all the three subject (Help?)
  • hiw to draw diffrent trameziums
  • soglow otto radio (Pretty sure I used to listen to that back on WRSU in my undergrad days.)
  • if a calendar has two consecutive months with friday the 13th which would they be (February and March, in a non-bissextile — that is, non-leap — year)
  • how to measure a christmas tree made of triangles and trapeziums (I would use a tape measure, myself)

So if I would summarize January 2015 in my readership here, I would say: tramezium?

My Math Blog Statistics, September 2014


Since it’s the start of a new month it’s time to review statistics for the previous month, which gives me the chance to list a bunch of countries, which is strangely popular with readers. I don’t pretend to understand this, I just accept the inevitable.

In total views I haven’t seen much change the last several months: September 2014 looks to be closing out with about 558 pages viewed, not a substantial change from August’s 561, and triflingly fewer than July’s 589. The number of unique visitors has been growing steadily, though: 286 visitors in September, compared to 255 the month before, and 231 the month before that. One can choose to read this as the views per visitor dropping to 1.95, its lowest figure since March, but I’ll take it as more people finding things that interest them, at least.

As to what those things are — well, mostly it’s comic strip posts, which I suppose makes sense given that they’re quite accessible and often contain jokes people understand. The most popular articles for September 2014 were:

As usual the country sending me the greatest number of readers was the United States (347), with Canada (29), Austria (27), the United Kingdom (26), and Puerto Rico and Turkey (20 each) coming up close behind. My single-reader countries for September were Bahrain, Brazil, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Slovenia, and Sweden. Finland, Germany, and Sweden were single-reader countries in August, too, but at least none of them were single-reader countries in July as well.

Among the search terms bringing people here the past month have been:

I got to my 17,882nd reader this month, a little short of that tolerably nice and round 18,000 readers. If I don’t come down with sudden-onset boringness, though, I’ll reach that in the next week or so, especially if I have a couple more days of twenty or thirty readers.

My Math Blog Statistics, August 2014


So, August 2014: it’s been a month that brought some interesting threads into my writing here. It’s also had slightly longer gaps in my writing than I quite like, because I’d just not had the time to do as much writing as I hoped. But that leaves the question of how this affected my readership: are people still sticking around and do they like what they see?

The number of unique readers around here, according to WordPress, rose slightly, from 231 in July to 255 in August. This doesn’t compare favorably to numbers like the 315 visitors in May, but still, it’s an increase. The total number of page views dropped from 589 in July to 561 in August and don’t think that the last few days of the month I wasn’t tempted to hit refresh a bunch of times. Anyway, views per visitor dropped from 2.55 to 2.20, which seems to be closer to my long-term average. And at some point in the month — I failed to track when — I reached my 17,000th reader, and got up to 17,323 by the end of the month. If I’m really interesting this month I could hit 18,000 by the end of September.

The countries sending me the most readers were, in first place, the ever-unsurprising United States (345). Second place was Spain (36) which did take me by surprise, and Puerto Rico was third (30). The United Kingdom, Austria, and Canada came up next so at least that’s all familiar enough, and India sent me a nice round dozen readers. I got a single reader from each of Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Finland, Germany, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Latvia, Mexico, Romania, Serbia, South Korea, Sweden, Thailand, and Venezuela. The only country that also sent me a single reader in July was Hong Kong (which also sent a lone reader in June and in May), and going back over last month’s post revealed that Spain and Puerto Rico were single-reader countries in July. I don’t know what I did to become more interesting there in August but I’ll try to keep it going.

The most popular articles in August were:

I fear I lack any good Search Term Poetry this month. Actually the biggest search terms have been pretty rote ones, eg:

  • trapezoid
  • barney and clyde carl friedrich comic
  • moment of inertia of cube around the longest diagonal
  • where do negative numbers come from
  • comic strip math cube of binomials

Actually, Gauss comic strips were searched for a lot. I’m sorry I don’t have more of them for folks, but have you ever tried to draw Gauss? I thought not. At least I had something relevant for the moment of inertia question even if I didn’t answer it completely.

July 2014 in Mathematics Blogging


We’ve finally reached the kalends of August so I can look back at the mathematics blog statistics for June and see how they changed in July. Mostly it’s a chance to name countries that had anybody come read entries here, which is strangely popular. I don’t know why.

Since I’d had 16,174 page views total at the start of July I figured I wasn’t going to cross the symbolically totally important 17,000 by the start of August and what do you know but I was right, I didn’t. I did have a satisfying 589 page views (for a total of 16,763), which doesn’t quite reach May’s heights but is a step up from June’s 492 views. The number of unique visitors as WordPress figures it was 231, up from June’s 194. That’s not an unusually large or small number of unique visitors for this year, and it keeps the views per visitor just about unchanged, 2.55 as opposed to June’s 2.54.

July’s most popular postings were mostly mathematics comics ones — well, they have the most reader-friendly hook after all, and often include a comic or two — but I’m gratified by what proved to be the month’s most popular since I like it too:

  1. To Build A Universe, and my simple toy version of an arbitrarily old universe. This builds on In A Really Old Universe and on What’s Going On In The Old Universe, and is followed by Lewis Carroll And My Playing With Universes, also some popular posts.
  2. Reading the Comics, July 3, 2014: Wulff and Morgenthaler Edition, I suppose because WuMo is a really popular comic strip these days.
  3. Reading the Comics, July 28, 2014: Homework in an Amusement Park Edition, I suppose because everybody likes amusement parks these days.
  4. Reading the Comics, July 24, 2014: Math Is Just Hard Stuff, Right? Edition, I suppose because people like thinking mathematics is hard these days.
  5. Some Things About Joseph Nebus, because I guess I had a sudden onset of being interesting?
  6. Reading the Comics, July 18, 2014: Summer Doldrums Edition, because summer gets to us all these days.

The countries sending me the most readers this month were the United States (369 views), the United Kingdom (43 views), and the Philippines (24 views). Australia, Austria, Canada, and Singapore turned up well too. Sending just a single viewer this month were Greece, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Norway, Puerto Rico, and Spain; Hong Kong and Japan were the only ones who did that in June, and for that matter May also. My Switzerland reader from June had a friend this past month.

Among the search terms that brought people to me this month:

  • comics strips for differential calculus
  • nebus on starwars
  • 82 % what do i need on my finalti get a c
  • what 2 monsters on monster legends make dark nebus

  • (this seems like an ominous search query somehow)
  • the 80s cartoon character who sees mathematics equations
  • starwars nebus
    (suddenly this Star Wars/Me connection seems ominous)
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe
    (I can’t argue with that)

June 2014 In Mathematics Blogging


And with the start of July I look over how well the mathematics blog did in June and see what I can learn from that. It seems more people are willing to read when I post stuff, which is worth knowing, I guess. After May’s near-record of 751 views and 315 visitors I expected a fall, and, yeah, it came. The number of pages viewed dropped to 492, which is … well, the fourth-highest this year at least? And the number of unique visitors fell to 194, which is actually the lowest of this year. The silver lining is this means the views per visitor, 2.54, was the second-highest since WordPress started sharing those statistics with me, so, people who come around find themselves interested. I start the month at 16,174 views total and won’t cross 17,000 at that rate come July, but we’ll see what I can do. And between WordPress and Twitter I’m (as of this writing) at exactly 400 followers, which isn’t worldshaking but is a nice big round number. I admit thinking how cool it would be if that were 400 million but I’d probably get stage fright if it were.

If one thing defined June it was “good grief but there’s a lot of mathematics comics”, which I attributed to Comic Strip Master Command ordering cartoonists to clear the subject out before summer vacation. It does mean the top five posts for June are almost comically lopsided, though:

Now, that really is something neat about triangles in the post linked above so please do read it. What I’m not clear about is why the June 16th comics post was so extremely popular; it’s nearly twice as viewed as the runner-up. If I were sure what keyword is making it so popular I’d do more with that.

Now on to the international portion of this contest: what countries are sending me the most visitors? Of course the United States comes in first, at 336 views. Denmark finished second with 17, and there was a three-way tie for third as Australia, Austria, and the United Kingdom sent sixteen each. (Singapore and Canada came in next with nine each.) I had a pretty nice crop of single-reader countries this month: Argentina, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Egypt, Ghana, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Paraguay, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland, and Thailand. Hong Kong, Japan, and Switzerland are repeats from last month and nobody’s got a three-month streak going.

Among the interesting search terms to bring people to me:

  • names for big numbers octillion [ happy to help? ]
  • everything to need to know about trapezoids [ I’m going to be the world’s authority on trapezoids! ]
  • what does the fact that two trapezoids make a parallelogram say about tth midline [ I have some ideas but don’t want to commit to anything particular ]
  • latching onto you 80 version [ I … think I’m being asked for lyrics? ]
  • planet nebus [ I feel vaguely snarked upon, somehow ]
  • origin is the gateway to your entire gaming universe [ … thank you? ]
  • nebus student job for uae [ Um … I guess I can figure out a consulting fee or something if you ask? ]

15,000 And A Half


I’d failed to mention the day it happened but I reached my 15,000th page view, just a couple days past the end of April. (If I haven’t added wrong, it was somebody who read something on the 5th of May.) So I like that my middling popularity is continuing, and, as I said in the review of April’s statistics, the blog-writing has felt particularly rich for me of late, for reasons I don’t consciously know. Meanwhile I’m already about a sixth of the way to 16,000, again, a gratifying touch. It’s horribly easy for a personality like mine to get worried about readership statistics; the flip side is when I’m not worried it feels so contented.

To cover the other half of my title, my dear love mentioned tripping over something in the tangent-plane article: “imagine the sphere sliced into a big and a small half by a plane. Imagine moving the plane in the direction of the smaller slice; this produces a smaller slice yet.” And how can there be a big and a small half?

Well, because I was sloppy in writing, is all. I should’ve said something like “a big and a small piece”. I failed to spend enough time editing and rereading before publishing. All I can say is this made me notice that apparently one can speak of two unequal halves of something without noticing that one is defying the literal meaning of the word. Maybe the ability to do so reflects an idea that a division of something might be equal in one way and unequal in others and the word “half” has to allow either sense. Maybe it just reflects that English is a supremely flexible language in that any word can mean pretty much anything, at any time, without any warning. Or I was just being sloppy.

My June 2013 Statistics


I don’t understand why, but an awful lot of the advice I see about blogging says that it’s important not just to keep track of how your blog is doing, but also to share it, so that … numbers will like you more? I don’t know. But I can give it a try, anyway.

For June 2013, according to WordPress, I had some 713 page views, out of 246 unique visitors. That’s the second-highest number of page views I’ve had in any month this year (January had 831 views), and the third-highest I’ve had for all time (there were 790 in March 2012). The number of unique visitors isn’t so impressive; since WordPress started giving me that information in December 2012, I’ve had more unique visitors … actually, in every month but May 2013. On the other hand, the pages-per-viewer count of 2.90 is the best I’ve had; the implication seems to be that I’m engaging my audience.

The most popular posts for the past month were Counting From 52 to 11,108, which I believe reflects it getting picked for a class assignment somehow; A Cedar Point Follow-Up, which hasn’t got much mathematics in it but has got pretty pictures of an amusement park, and Solving The Price Is Right’s “Any Number” Game, which has got some original mathematics but also a pretty picture.

My all-time most popular posts are from the series about Trapezoids — working out how to find their area, and how many kinds of trapezoids there are — with such catchy titles as How Many Trapezoids I Can Draw, or How Do You Make A Trapezoid Right?, or Setting Out To Trap A Zoid, which should be recognized as a Dave Barry reference.

My most frequent commenters, “recent”, whatever that means, are Chiaroscuro and BunnyHugger (virtually tied), with fluffy, elkelement, MJ Howard, and Geoffrey Brent rounding out the top six.

The most common source of page clicks the past month was from the United States (468), with Brazil (51) and Canada (23) taking silver and bronze. And WordPress recorded one click each from Portugal, Serbia, Hungary, Macedonia (the Former Yugoslav Republic), Indonesia, Argentina, Poland, Slovenia, and Viet Nam. I’ve been to just one of those countries.